High School Principals



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Belt, W. Dwayne

Belt, W. Dwayne
Orem, Utah US

Dwayne and Glenys Belt

Faculty & Staff. W. Dwayne Belt [Wilbur]. He served as the Principal XIX of BYH during the 1961-1962 academic year. As head of all student activities, he came to BY High from Colorado. Dr. Belt added much to the success of BY High. He endeavored to improve working relationships between the faculty and the student body. His sense of humor and personality helped to create a friendly atmosphere. Working directly with students, he provided understanding leadership through wise counsel and advice. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Dwayne Belt of Orem, passed away from a sudden severe illness on September 14, 2007, at the age of 78. He was born in Burroak Township, Iowa, on August 9, 1929 to Wilbur and Ruth Clement Belt. When he was 16, his family moved to Las Vegas, Nevada. He spent his senior year there involved in drama, music and track, and was voted 'most versatile graduate'. He attended BYU, where he participated in the band and on the track team, graduating with a BA in Music in 1952. While at BYU, he was converted to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Dwayne met Glenys Rollins in the clarinet section of the BYU Concert Band. They became eternal sweethearts when they were married in the Salt Lake Temple on August 25, 1952. He served in the United States Army from 1952 until 1954. Dwayne was a school teacher and principal in Lyman, then Evanston, Wyoming; after which he attended Northern Colorado University, receiving his master's and doctor's degrees. In 1961, Dwayne began to serve as Principal at B.Y. High School, through the 1961-1962 academic year.. He then transferred to BYU's College of Education, where he taught for 30 years. He served faithfully in church positions throughout his life, including missions with his wife to the Las Vegas, Nevada Mission, and the St. George Temple Visitor's Center and historic sites. At the time of his death, he was Branch President at the Canyon Breeze Assisted Living Center in Orem. He enjoyed being a member of the Orem Golden K Kiwanis Club. Dwayne loved sports and was an avid BYU, Utah Jazz and New York Yankees fan. He also loved good music and was very proud of the musical and athletic accomplishments of his children and grandchildren. He enjoyed a simple life - he was reliable, thrifty, punctual and orderly. He preferred a good hamburger and a malt to a filet mignon and a fancy dessert. His family adored him. Dwayne is survived by his wife, Glenys, of Orem; and his five children: Carol Belt [BYH Class of 1972~H] (Jon) Mitchell of Lehi; Connie Belt [BYH Class of 1973~H] (Jay) Jones, of Fairview, Texas; Terry (Hollie) Belt [BYH Class of 1975~H], of Orem; Shawna Belt [BYH Class of 1977~H] (John) Edwards, of Provo; Linda (Tom) Urquhart, of Orem; 28 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his siblings, David, Jerry, Jimmy and Donna Belt, all of Las Vegas; and Peggy Hoskin, of Cedar City. Funeral services were held Wednesday, September 19, 2007, in the Sharon Park 3rd Ward chapel, 200 North 200 East, Orem. Interment, Orem City Cemetery. [Provo Daily Herald, Tuesday, September 18, 2007.]

Berryessa, Max J.
2830 Marrcrest West
Provo, Utah 84604-3824 US

Max and Janet Berryessa
  • Work: (801) 373-2830

Faculty & Staff. Max J. Berryessa. Eighteenth Principal of Brigham Young High School, 1958 to 1961. He married Janet G. He attended Weber State AA Education 1947. BYU BS Elementary Education 1948. BYU MS Teaching & Learning 1949. Stanford University EDD Elementary Education 1959. ~ ~ ~ ~ I served as Principal at BYH from the fall of 1958 until the end of the school year in 1961, when I accepted an invitation to go on leave from BYU to accept a two-year assignment to work with the Ministry of Education in Thailand. ~ ~ ~ ~ PROVO - Several graduates of BYU were honored at the annual BYU Emeritus Awards annual meeting and luncheon in the Wilkinson Student Center ballroom. "Every year we select several long-time graduates of BYU whose service either to their professions, communities or church is exemplary, " said Todd Hendricks, alumni activities program administrator. " While some have received wide notice for their achievements, others' service has been less noticeable but no less significant." Award recipients included Max J. Berryessa, of Provo, who has spent his career improving education, both at home and throughout the world. He served as the 18th Principal of Brigham Young High School from 1958 to 1962. His professional abilities in education have caused him to be in great demand, and he spent several years as an educational consultant in Iran and several more as an educational adviser to the ministry of education in Thailand. He also had a tour of duty in Asia as a teacher education specialist for UNESCO. Berryessa retired from BYU after 40 years, 10 of which were as Chair of the Elementary Education Department. While at BYU he received the Karl G. Maeser Award for Teaching Excellence. [Provo Daily Herald, March 10, 2001.] ~ ~ ~ ~ BERRYESSA 70TH ANNIVERSARY. Max Berryessa and Janet Greaves, having met at Ogden High School, were married in San Francisco, California on January 14, 1944 in the San Francisco Ward. Max was in the U.S. Navy stationed at Treasure Island. They were later sealed in the Logan Temple on January 14, 1946. Max completed his Associates degree at Weber College, then went on to complete his Bachelors and Masters degrees at Brigham Young University and later his Doctorate at Stanford University. He became a member of the faculty of BYU while working on his Masters degree and retired after 40 years of teaching in the Department of Elementary Education, serving as Chairman of the Department for 10 years. Max and Janet and their 2 oldest sons lived 3 years in Teheran, Iran on leave from BYU while Max was employed by the US Government in the Point-Four Program. They also lived 2 years in Bangkok, Thailand with all 4 sons again on leave from BYU while serving for the US Government in the Agency for International Development. Ten years later they were on assignment and lived again in Bangkok with their youngest son while Max served with UNESCO as Educational Advisor for all of Asia. Max was the first Branch President in Thailand and later, on their second assignment there, was Counselor to the Mission President. Max and Janet served two mission as Counselor and Assistant Matron in the Bern, Switzerland Temple. Max served in several bishoprics and branch presidencies and as a Temple Sealer for 22 years. He served for 10 years on the All Church Correlation Committee. Janet served in ward and stake Relief Society presidencies as well as Primary presidencies. She was also a travel agent for 20 years in Provo. Janet served as Secretary to the Principal of the International School on both assignments in Bangkok. She also served as Secretary to the Administrative Officer of the Ogden Arsenal during the War while Max was serving in the Navy. Last August their children hosted a 90th birthday party for their parents for families and friends. Although their 4 sons and families are scattered, they remain a very close family. They have 13 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. [Provo Daily Herald, January 12, 2014] Source. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Janet Marian Greaves Berryessa, 92, passed away Wednesday April 20, 2016, in St. George Utah. Janet was born October 22, 1923 to Gescul James Greaves and Emma Katherine Olsen Greaves in Ogden, Utah, where she lived during her school years. She married Max Joseph Berryessa on January 14, 1944 in San Francisco, California. The marriage was solemnized January 14, 1946 in the Logan Temple. During World War II she worked as Secretary to the Administrative Officer at the Ogden Arsenal for 5 years. She lived with her husband and children in Tehran, Iran for 3 years and 3 years in Bangkok, Thailand while her husband was on leave from his teaching position at Brigham Young University, serving with the US State Department and later UNESCO. While in Bangkok she was administrative assistant to the Principal at International School of Bangkok. After her children were raised she worked as a travel agent for 20 years in Provo. She also did volunteer work at Utah Valley Regional Hospital, Habitat for Humanity and in the Literacy Program at the Provo Library. She was a member of the Bonheur Social Club, and an officer in the BYU Women organization. She served two missions with her husband. The first was in Bilbao, Spain for six months, then they were transferred to the Swiss Temple to serve in the temple presidency. They went back for a second tour in the Swiss Temple a couple of years later. They also worked as missionaries in the Church Service Department at Church headquarters. She served in many positions in the LDS Church in Ward and Stake Relief Society and Primary presidencies and as a teacher. She is survived by her husband, Max, St. George, Utah, her sons Richard (Susan), Las Vegas, Nevada, Scott (Marilyn), Lehi, Utah, Dean (Trudy), Santa Clara, Utah, and Guy (Trey) San Francisco, California, 18 grandchildren and 29 great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her sister Geneal Smith, Bountiful, Utah. She was preceded in death by her parents, one brother and four sisters. A small graveside service will be held on Saturday Afternoon (time to be determined) at the Santa Clara City Cemetery, 2365 Rachel Drive, Santa Clara, Utah. Metcalf Mortuary in St. George (435-673-4221) is handling the arrangements. [Provo Daily Herald, April 22,2016]

Boyle, William H. Jr. (1905, 1906, F&S)

Boyle, William H. Jr. (1905, 1906, F&S)
Provo, Utah US

Will & Minnie Alice Boyle

Brigham Young High School Graduate, Class of 1905 and 1906, Faculty, Principal. William Henry Boyle, Jr. He started out on a pace to graduate with the Class of 1893, but due to teaching assignments before he received his diploma, William H. Boyle eventually graduated from the BY High School, Normal Department, on Wednesday, May 31, 1905, in College Hall. He delivered the Valedictory address at that ceremony. Source 1: Program, Normal & High School Graduating Exercises, Wednesday, May 31, 1905, College Hall. ~ ~ ~ ~ Brigham Young High School Class of 1905. W. H. Boyle. He received a Normal Diploma. Source 2: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 169. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1905. W. H. Boyle, a Normal graduate. BYU [& BYH] Class of 1905 Listing of BYH Normal, High School, Commercial, Music & Arts and Industries Graduates, Catalogues & Announcements, for 30th Academic Year, 1905-1906, p. 176. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1905, W. H. Boyle was serving as Principal of the Preparatory School. ~ ~ ~ ~ Brigham Young High School, Class of 1906. W. H. Boyle received a Certificate in Elocution. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B.Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 169. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1913. William H. Boyle. He received an A.B. Degree in 1913. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 1. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. William H. Boyle, Jr., Problems of Democracy, Economics & Education teacher, 1902-1903 to 1935-37, then BYU to 1945. William Henry Boyle, Jr., Seventh Principal of BY High School from 1909-1910 to 1925-1926, one of the longest-serving BYH principals at 17 years. In his "Reminiscences" he notes that he took a one-year leave of absence from 1923-1924, due to ill health. He is listed as faculty at BYH in 1932-33 in Economics, and in 1943-44 as Professor of Education. He was born October 19, 1874, Santaquin, Utah. Married Minne Alice Wright of Nephi, Utah on September 3, 1902. They had three children. Former Principal William Henry Boyle, Jr., died March 18, 1965 in Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1923. William H. Boyle. He received an MA Degree in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 1. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYU Archives Publication: Boyle, William H., "Reminiscences", 1946. 1 volume. Call Number: UA OH 163, Abstract: Boyle describes his childhood, his educational background, his professional affiliation with Brigham Young University, and his spiritual experiences. ~~~~ His parents: William Henry Boyle, Sr., & Mary Jane Ewell Boyle. Wife: Minnie Alice Wright Boyle. His father: William Henry Boyle Sr., born 19 February 1851 in Ogden, Utah; died 22 January 1913, place not recorded. Santaquin City Cemetery, Lot 27, Block A, Grave #1ET. William Henry Boyle, Jr., was schooled at Santaquin and went to Brigham Young Academy when he was 17 years of age, with money he had saved by working in the mines and hauling lumber. He studied under Karl G. Maeser for the last three months at the old ZCMI Building and marched to the new Academy Education Building in January of 1892. He mustered up courage and told the new principal, Benjamin Cluff, Jr., of his financial troubles. Cluff had him take care of cows and chickens, chop wood and keep lawn cut, telling him, "You can board with us, but we have no place [for you] to sleep." Prof. McKendric loaned him a bed out of his loft, and he slept in a small room in the Academy. He studied in Room D. He later batched with other boys going to school, finishing in 1893. He worked as a teacher and principal in Scipio, Juab and Levan. In 1900 he entered BYA for another year. In 1901 he became a teacher of the 8th grade in Nephi, Utah for two years. In 1903 he returned to Provo and BYA, where he was given the job of principal of the sub-High School, [graduating from the Normal Department in 1905] and in 1909-1910 became principal of the High School through 1925-1926. He then became a professor of Education at BYU, teaching until 1944, when 71 years of age. Served on many state boards. BYU AB 1913; BYU MA 1923. One year of graduate work at USC and two summer schools at Berkeley. As a student he knew Karl G. Maeser, and worked under 5 BYU presidents: Cluff, Brimhall, Harris, McDonald, and Wilkinson. His three children went to BYU from kindergarten to college graduation. 1) Melva B. Boyle, BYH Class of 1922?, married Laurence H. Hutchings, Salt Lake City. 2) Wilma S. Boyle, BYH Class of 1924?, married Bertell Bunker, Salt Lake City. 3) Dr. William Sidney Boyle, BYH Class of 1926?, married Rowena Christensen, Logan, Utah. [Brief profile of Wm. H. Boyle, Jr., in The Sons of Brigham by T. Earl Pardoe, 1969, pp. 11-13.]

Brimhall, George Henry (1880)

Brimhall, George Henry (1880)
Provo, Utah US

George and 2 Brimhall

BYA High School Class of 1880. George Henry Brimhall. He was one of the first graduates of the BYA. Brimhall also served as Fourth Principal of Brigham Young High School Principal from 1895 to 1900. He studied at the Timpanogos Branch of the University of Deseret in Provo, a predecessor of both the University of Utah and Brigham Young Academy. The Timpanogos Branch was a Provo high school extension of the school that became the University of Utah; after financial problems forced the closure of its Provo branch, it reopened the next year on January 3, 1876, with the same principal [Warren Dusenberry] in the same building [Lewis Hall] but with a new name: Brigham Young Academy. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Theology, Pedagogy, and Psychology teacher, 1897-1932. He appears in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Principal Benjamin Cluff in 1892. Fourth Principal of BY Academy 1895 to 1900. From 1900 to 1904 N. L. Nelson became Principal of BY High School. Brimhall became President of Brigham Young University from 1904 until 1921. Students under Brimhall remembered his tenure as "the good old Brimhall days." This is intended as a compliment to the spirit and personality of George H. Brimhall, for he breathed into the school a special charisma which people never forgot. He was particularly known for his short, pithy talks at devotionals. Ezra Taft Benson has written "No man has so inspired me with so few spoken words as has President Brimhall in his famous four-minute assembly talks." The President was equally impressive in his full dissertations. Often when speaking to the students he was both intense and dramatic and could either inspire them or evoke tender pathos or a sense of horrific guilt, illustrated in an incident reported by J. Edward Johnson, who describes a real "scorcher" given by Brimhall after a rash of pilfering had hit the student body at BYU. Brimhall was particularly incensed over the theft of a watch from a gym locker. "None who heard him would ever forget how small, little, unbelievably diminutive he made that thief." With dramatic pauses Brimhall said that if the culprit had "even so much as a trace of conscience and character every tick of that watch would say to him, 'thief." 'Thief, thief; thief, thief; thief, thief.'" He suggested that perhaps the guilty person might want to return the watch. The story goes that when he came into his office early the following morning, Brimhall found several watches on his desk. George H. Brimhall was a strong and compelling personality with wide versatility in talent and achievement. In terms of his time and culture he must be credited with high marks for his devotion to Brigham Young Academy and BYU, the Church, and the state. While rearing 14 children, presiding over the Church University, and serving on the Church Board of Examiners, he still found time to write, teach, preach, and counsel. He not only guided the University through some of its most difficult times, but also guided students in choosing the paths they would follow in life. "The school depends not on man, or any set of men. God planted it and we are but gardeners to take care of it." —George H. Brimhall Born: December 9, 1852 in Salt Lake City. Died: July 29, 1932 in Provo, Utah. Father: George Washington Brimhall (1814–1895); Mother: Rachel Ann Myers (1829–1917). Families: A~~ Alsina Elizabeth Wilkins (1856–1926) md. December 28, 1874 - 1. Lucy Jane (1875–1957); 2. Alsina Elizabeth (1876–1960); 3. [unnamed] (b. ca. 1878); 4. George Washington (1878–1854); 5. Mark Henry (1880–1965); 6. Wells Lovett (1882–1947); 7. Milton Albert (1883–1884). B~~ Flora McDonald Robertson (1865–1950) md. September 11,1885 - 1. Dean Robertson (1886–1972); 2. Fay Robertson (1889–1972); 3. Fawn Robertson (1889–1960); 4. Burns Robertson (1892–1976); 5. Ruth Afton (1895–1965); 6. Alta Robertson (1901–1903); 7. Areo Robertson (1909–1990); 8. One living (Ancestral File). Despite dire financial conditions, George's mother was determined that he get an education. He attended school in Ogden, Salt Lake, Cedar Fort, southern Utah, and Spanish Fork. When a high school was started in Provo —- the Dusenberry school on Second East, then known as Timpanogos University -- George worked odd jobs to pay for his board. When he couldn't find work, the family sacrificed, despite hard financial times, so he could attend. Then, 42 young men decided it would be a good idea to have a high school in Spanish Fork and they contributed $15 each in work and funds. They brought logs down from Santaquin Canyon. In 40 days they had a big house-raising with the whole community present. They called it the Young Men's Academy but women came too. His first wife attended. Tom Beesley taught the first, and Brimhall taught the next two or three years, incuding Algebra, Bookkeeping, Grammar, History, and Elocution. Brimhall became Spanish Fork's superintendent of schools for two terms, then County School Superintendent for two years. He was authorized to be ordained a patriarch by LDS Church apostles in 1887. In 1897 George joined the Brigham Young Academy faculty. When Brigham Young Academy President George Cluff took an expedition to South America in 1900, Brimhall was named acting president, and then succeeded Cluff in 1904. In 1903 the academy had become Brigham Young University. Brimhall introduced the B.S. program in 1904 and the B.A. in 1907. The Maeser Memorial was completed in 1911. It was also the year that a conflict between orthodox church teachings, and evolution and higher criticism, came to a head, leading to the dismissal or resignation of Joseph and Henry Peterson, and Ralph Chamberlain. Brimhall had hired the three and was sympathetic toward the professors, but Superintendent of Church Schools Horace Cummings was determined to rid BYU of "modernists". Despite severe chest and abdominal pain, which he suffered throughout his life, George Brimhall served seventeen years as President of BYU — until 1921. In that year, at age eighty, he took his own life with a hunting rifle. ~~~~ George Henry Brimhall (1853-1932) was the son of George Washington Brimhall (b.1814) and (2) Rachel Ann Mayer (b.1829) of Iron Co., Utah Territory. He married (1) Alsina Elizabeth Wilkins (d.1926), the daughter of George Washington Wilkins and Catherine Augusta Lovett in 1874. He married (2) Flora Robertson in 1885. He was the father of 15 children. He served as an instructor and principal at Brigham Young Academy, and later as a President of Brigham Young University (1904-1921). [Brief profile in The Sons of Brigham by T. Earl Pardoe, 1969, pp. 15-25.] ~ ~ ~ ~ In connection with Brigham Young Academy Commencement in May of 1899, an Alumni Banquet was held at the Hotel Roberts in Provo with about two hundred people attending. Four alumni spoke about different periods of time in the life of the Academy. "Prof. G. H. Brimhall brought the narration from '92 to '99. In 1892 the institution was removed from the old warehouse to the present main [Education] building, and in 1899 it 'swarmed' again to the new college. Furthermore, the parent institution has sent out several healthy colonies." Source: Deseret Evening News, May 27, 1899. [The other three speakers: Mrs. Hannah Stubbs Jones, J. Golden Kimball, and Newton Noyes.]

Christensen, Herbert K.

Christensen, Herbert K.
Provo, Utah US

Herbert and Lillian Christensen

Faculty & Staff. Twelfth Principal of BY High School from 1949 to 1950. Herbert K. Christensen was born August 25, 1906 in Springdale, Washington County, Utah. His parents: Samuel Christensen and Lori Gifford Christensen. He married Lillian Anderson on December 12, 1931, in Beaver, Utah. He earned two degrees from Brigham Young University, B.S. in 1945, and M.S. in 1948. He died January 21, 1950 in Provo, Utah, from a heart attack, while serving as Principal of Brigham Young High School. Interment, Springdale Cemetery, Washington County, Utah. In 1945-46 and 1946-47 he had taught Religion and Problems of Democracy. In 1947-48 and 1948-49 he taught Social Science & English. When Principal A. John Clarke left to continue his education in January of 1949, Christensen was named acting principal, and was later announced as the incoming Principal. He served as acting principal for six months, then as principal for less than six months, before his death. His son, Albert Leon Christensen, graduated from BYH in the Class of 1951. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. BYU Training School Teacher, Second Grade, 1950s. Lillian Anderson Christensen married twice: First, on December 12, 1931 to Herbert K. Christensen in Beaver, Utah. He died of a heart attack on January 21, 1950 in Provo, Utah, while serving as Principal of Brigham Young High School. She married a second time, on June 29, 1963, to Willard Grant Smith in Salt Lake City, Utah. She earned her pilot's license so she could fly with her husband, Willard, in his single engine plane, and be capable of flying the plane herself. Lillian worked at the "Gathering Place" to help kids turn their lives around. When Lillian was diagnosed with cancer, she went through chemotherapy and lost her hair. During that time, George H. W. Bush (the first Bush president) flew into the Provo Airport to present his "Point of Light" award to Lillian, because of her work helping youth improve their lives. "She wore a wig for that occasion," said Carol Davis, Lillian's stepdaughter. "President Bush flew into Provo in a small plane, not his big president's plane." Lillian died about five weeks before Willard G. Smith died. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Lillian Anderson Christensen Smith died on November 6, 1996 after a lingering illness. She was born in Parowan, Utah on September 24, 1912 to Niels Albert Anderson and Amy Deslie Lowe Anderson. Lillian's funeral services were held Monday, November 11, 1996, in Provo. Interment, Springdale City Cemetery (Washington County). The family suggested contributions to the "Gathering Place", 251 E. 1200 South, Orem, UT 84058, in Lillian's name. [Deseret News, November 9, 1996.]~ ~ ~ ~ An award, the "Lillian Smith Youth Advocate of the Year" is presented in Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ TRIBUTE BYH PRINCIPAL: Herbert K. Christensen, 43 years of age, was assistant professor of secondary education at Brigham Young University. All who met him were impressed that he was an extraordinary individual. There is little room for regret when we realize how much life he packed into his few short years on earth. As a man of principle, outstanding leadership, and as a great teacher, he gained the admiration and respect of all who knew him. Words are merely expressions of the mind which seek to fathom the depth of the human soul. The life of Herbert K. Christensen is his real tribute. [BYU Banyan, 1950, page 418.]

Clark, A. John

Clark, A. John
(See Clarke, A. John)

John Clark

Principal. See CLARKE, A. John.

Clarke, A. John

Clarke, A. John
Orem, Utah US

John & Rissa+ Marian Clarke

Faculty & Staff. A. John Clarke, Physics, Mathematics, Theology, 1937-1948. Eleventh Principal of BY High School from 1946 to 1949. He served as Acting Principal in 1943. In 1945-46 taught Art. His first year as Principal was 1946-47, and he continued through 1947-1948, when he handed off the office to Herbert K. Christensen. BYU Archives: Clarke, A. John, Oral history interview, July 27, 1977. 1 volume. Call Number: UA OH 21, Abstract: Interview by C. Garn Coombs with A. John Clarke, BYU professor, concerning his experiences as a student at BYU during the late 1930's, and as an instructor and principal of BY High School in the mid-1940's. Also served a Provo City Commissioner 1981-1982. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Alva John Clarke, 87, of Orem died Saturday, December 30, 1995, in Provo, Utah. He was born July 3, 1908, in Magrath, Alberta, Canada, a son of Peter Gemmell and Vilate Green Clarke. He married Xarissa (Rissa) Merkley July 4, 1929, in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, and their marriage was solemnized July 23, 1929, in the Alberta Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She died August 17, 1986, in Provo, Utah. He married Marian Green Stephens May 8, 1987, in Rexburg, Idaho, and they make their home in Orem, Utah. He was educated in Magrath schools and obtained a teaching certificate from Calgary Normal School. He was a teacher and principal in Canada before coming to Brigham Young University. He was a member of the faculty of BYU for 35 years until his retirement in 1973. He was principal of BY High School, a professor of education administration, assistant dean and acting dean of the College of Education at BYU. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Brigham Young University and an Ed.D. from the University of Colorado in 1950. With his wife Rissa, he worked in Iran as an advisor in the Point IV Program to revise the curriculum of the secondary schools and returned there at the request of the Minister of Education to further that work and to be an advisor to the Chancellor of the University of Tehran. In 1967 he went to Washington D.C. where he aided the U.S. Office of Education as Chief of Program Management for the Follow-Through program of Head Start. Active in civic concerns, he was a long-time member of the Provo Kiwanis Club, the BYU Cougar Club, and was involved with the AARP and Timpanogas Transit Authority, serving each as president. In 1980 he was elected Provo City Commissioner serving with Anagene Mecham and Major James Ferguston. He was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was a high priest in Suncrest 2nd Ward at the time of his death. He served as bishop in Canada and in Provo. He is survived by his wife, Marian of Orem, Utah; one son and four daughters, Margaret Riley, Kaysville, Utah; Sybil (Roger) Ferguson, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jack A. (Marilyn) Clarke, Rexburg, Idaho; Jill (Alan) Harris, Cleveland, Ohio; and Kathryn (Paul) Williams, Mesa, Arizona. His stepchildren are Kay (Arlan) Mortensen, Pocatello, Idaho; Greg M. (Linda) Stephens, Sweet Home, Oregon; Roger C. (Julie) Stephens, Salem, Oregon; Courtney G. (Kelly) Stephens, St. George, Utah. He was preceded in death by his parents; four brothers and two sisters, Peter Drew, James Green, Jesse, Wilson, Jennie, and Sarah Elizabeth (Sadie); and by grandchildren, Peter Riley and Ann Harris. Funeral services were held Wednesday, January 3, 1996 in Orem, Utah. Interment, American Fork City Cemetery. [Published in the Deseret News, Monday, January 1, 1996.]

Cluff, Benjamin, Jr.

Cluff, Benjamin, Jr.
Provo, Utah/Mexico/Calif US

Benjamin Cluff

BYA High School Class of 1883. Benjamin Cluff, Jr. Faculty & Staff. Teacher of Mathematics, Psychology and Bookkeeping, 1882-1903. Third Principal of BY Academy 1892-1895, first President of Brigham Young Academy. In 1903 BYA became Brigham Young University, and so for a matter of months he served as the first President of BYU. ~ ~ ~ ~ Benjamin Cluff, Jr., was born February 7, 1858 in Provo, Utah to Benjamin Cluff, Sr. and Mary Ellen Foster Cluff. His father was a mechanic and carpenter, and his mother was a pioneer of 1852. When Benjamin Jr. was seven years old, he traveled to the Sandwich Islands -- now Hawaii -- to join his father who was on a mission there. Benjamin lived in Laie for five years. He quickly learned the Hawaiian language. He assisted in building the first sugar mill and participated in the manufacturing of sugar. He also helped pick the first cotton crop grown in the islands. The islanders and the Indians fascinated young Benjamin, and he formulated Book of Mormon research to test whether there was any truth in his theory of emigration from the mainland to the islands of the Pacific. Ethnology and archeology came to life for the young scholar. When he was twelve years of age, Benjamin Jr. returned to Logan, Utah to help his father in the carpentry business. He didn't like attending school until, at the age of fifteen, a sudden change in attitude set him on a search for knowledge and an education. At seventeen his uncle, William W. Cluff, then President of the Summit Stake, invited Benjamin Jr. to come to Coalville, Utah where the young man worked in the tithing office and in the post office for two years. He also became librarian of the Coalville City Library and delighted in the opportunity to peruse the books held in the library. Surrounded by knowledge and thirsting for more, he decided to travel to Provo, where he hoped to attend the newly established Brigham Young Academy. In May of 1877, undeterred by the 65-mile distance between himself and campus, Benjamin Jr. set out for Brigham Young Academy on foot. He carried only an umbrella and a small bundle of clothing. After stopping overnight to visit an uncle on a ranch between Park City and Kamas, he got a ride just outside of Park City, and soon the nineteen-year-old man arrived in Provo. Harvey H. Cluff, a director of the new Academy, introduced the young man to its brand-new principal, Karl G. Maeser. The principal reportedly shook Cluff's hand and gave him a warm greeting. "It is an honor and a pleasure to meet and welcome into our school a young man with an ambition to fit himself for service in God's kingdom," Maeser said. "You will be happy here." The young man dedicated himself to attend the Academy, which was then located in the Lewis Building, but the first school year was just three weeks from closing. During the summer he was employed hauling coal and supplies between Provo and Coalville. His father offered him a one-third interest in a good farm in Wasatch County, but the son told his father, "If you release me to go to school, I will never ask you for assistance." The next morning Cluff was in Provo and began attending BY Academy classes. It was the fall term of 1877, and he was hired as a part-time janitor to help him with his expenses. Benjamin Jr. excelled as a student, and was invited to become a member of the Normal Class. Soon he was appointed a teacher in the BY Academy Primary Department. He studied school organization and continued with his education until one day Principal Maeser called him to his office and informed him that the Church needed missionaries in the Islands. Cluff had lived there, and still spoke the native language. Benjamin wondered aloud if he should not first finish his schooling, but Principal Maeser assured him that his schooling was primarily intended to prepare him for a mission, and that his mission would prepare him for life. Though the call was unexpected and school was just starting, he left in October of 1878, served a successful mission in Hawaii, and returned to Brigham Young Academy in 1882. He graduated from the Academy's high school in the Class of 1883. He returned to Provo and Brigham Young Academy, where he was employed as an instructor. He joined the faculty along with former fellow Academy students, James E. Talmage, Joseph M. Tanner, and Joseph B. Keeler. On Sunday evening, January 27, 1884, a fire, which started in the chemistry lab, completely destroyed the Lewis building. The Academy moved into temporary quarters, including Provo's ZCMI warehouse. In August of 1884, Benjamin married Mary Jane John, the daughter of President David John, and was appointed Stake Superintendent of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association (YMMIA). Benjamin Cluff's education and mission experiences had given him a deep desire to further his education. In 1886, he requested and received a leave of absence from his teaching responsibilities. He made the trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan where he enrolled in the University of Michigan. There he purchased a coal oil lamp and began to study. He received his bachelor's and master's degree from this university. At the University of Michigan, Cluff distinguished himself as a scholar. He polished his skills in writing and debating by defending the doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in print and in open forums. While in Ann Arbor he debated before the student body a question of national interest, "Resolved, that Utah is ready for Statehood." That experience made him a marked man, and many challenges were hurled at him as long as he was on campus. He accepted as many debates and conferences as his schooling permitted. He graduated in the upper brackets of his class with a B.S. degree in 1890, one of the first Utahans to earn a degree from an eastern university. Cluff formed a close friendship with the president of the University of Michigan at that time, James Burrill Angell. This association influenced and enhanced his views on the future of higher education. While at the University of Michigan, Cluff was also exposed to the works of several of the most influential educators of his time, including Charles W. Eliot, John Dewey and Aaron B. Hinsdale. He became determined to bring many new educational ideas back to Brigham Young Academy and use them to strengthen the academic reputation of his young alma mater. In 1890 Cluff returned to Provo and Brigham Young Academy, where he was employed as an instructor in Mathematics. He was also appointed assistant principal. Between 1883 and 1903 he taught Primary Education, Mathematics, Psychology, Bookkeeping, and Didactics. In 1891 Professor Cluff launched a summer school designed to provide in-service training for teachers in the region. The instructor of the Summer School was to be a prominent educator. Colonel Francis W. Parker of the Cook County Normal College was the first instructor in 1892. Other instructors included James Baldwin from the University of Texas, and Burk A. Hinsdale from the University of Michigan. Cluff actively encouraged educators to come to Utah and share their knowledge with the students and faculty of Brigham Young Academy. In 1885, following the fire that devastated the Lewis Building, The Academy rented the upper story of Provo's ZCMI warehouse for the temporary use of the Academy. About the same time, a city block of land on Fifth North was purchased, and a large foundation was laid, only to lie dormant for seven years for lack of funding. When Benjamin Cluff returned from Ann Arbor, he became a vigorous leader in planning and working to complete the new building. By the late fall of 1892 the second and third stories were completed. Members of the Academy's Board came forward and mortgaged their own private property to aid in completing the facility. The curriculum for a four-year high school was designed, and in January of 1892, the school moved to its long-awaited new quarters. When the new Academy Building was dedicated on January 4, 1892, the principalship of the Academy formally passed from Karl G. Maeser to Benjamin Cluff, Jr. It was a memorable occasion and an estimated 1,000 people from all over the Utah Territory participated the ceremonies. At the time, beloved leader Karl G. Maeser said of himself and the new building, "The old man taught in a cabin, but they have built a palace for his boys." But when the dedicatory services for the Academy Building had ended, Benjamin Cluff, Jr., turned his full attention to the hard realities of his new position. Cluff lengthened class periods from half an hour to one hour, increased expectations of the faculty, increased the reading and writing requirements expected of students, and added new courses to the curriculum, including psychology, a subject new to western academia. He made every effort to organize the school as a leading normal training institution -- preparing LDS teachers for employment throughout the Church -- with full courses in kindergarten, primary, academic (high school), commerce, and missionary divisions. Much of this academic planning came directly from Benjamin Cluff. Even at this early date it was obvious that Cluff was working toward the goal of transforming the Academy into both a secondary school and a school of higher education -- a goal that was realized eleven years later in 1903. Upon being named Principal, Cluff had immediately identified three main problems that faced the Academy, and he began to work with his faculty, Board and Church leaders to solve them. The first problem was the emergence of a rival proposal to establish a university in Salt Lake City which would serve as the center of the Church's educational system. Cluff felt this move was a serious threat to the support and even the survival of Brigham Young Academy in Provo. The second problem was the alarming deterioration of the financial condition of the school during the last years of Principal Maeser's administration, significantly precipitated by the expense of the new building. And third, Cluff knew that in order to improve the scholastic standing and educational program of the Academy, he would need to seek and win greater and more dependable support from the General Authorities and the General Board of Education of the Church. The most serious of the three problems was the worst financial crisis in the history of the Academy — even worse than the many crises that had plagued the Maeser administration. The leaders of the LDS Church became very aware that the Church needed acceptable, educated leaders, and at their urging, Professor Cluff readily accepted the opportunity to return to Michigan in 1893 to obtain a Master's Degree, and then tour the leading schools in the northern U.S. and parts of Canada to obtain guidance for building the Provo curriculum. From the beginning, Brigham Young Academy was an independent private school. It was not officially sponsored by the LDS Church. It is true that it received some sporadic income from the charitable donations of private individuals and various LDS wards and stakes, and a small income from student tuition, but a significant factor was the sacrificial service of the faculty, many of whom survived by farming, and were paid little or nothing. Cluff soon came to the conclusion that the only real solution to the school's many financial problems was for the Academy to seek and obtain the official sponsorship and financial support of the LDS Church. He wrote that "one evening while returning from a walk down town and while studying deeply over the future of the Academy, the thought came to me like an inspiration: 'Give the school to the Church.' Immediately my mind was at rest. I knew that it was the right thing to do." Although similar suggestions had been made and rejected a number of times in the past, on July 18, 1896, he formally requested this action, and this time the Board of Trustees officially agreed to incorporate the primary, middle and high school, and the institution was adopted as an official educational institution of the LDS Church. Regarding the use of the title "Principal" and "President", on July 20, 1895 the BYA Board of Trustees determined that "Principal" would apply to heads of departments, and the title "President" would now apply to former principal Cluff, so he became the first President of Brigham Young Academy. Utah achieved statehood in 1896, and student registration was opened to non-Mormons for the first time. Cluff interviewed and hired the first non-Mormon to be employed on the regular faculty. Miss Abby Celestia Hale served for three years as director of the Elementary Training School. A teacher, she was the niece of Edward Everett Hale, US Senate Chaplain and author of the story, "Man Without A Country". Her work as adjudged to have achieved the highest standards. To further dignify the leadership of President Cluff, in 1898 the Board conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Didactics. By the time Cluff retired on December 23, 1903, BYA had become BYU, he had served as the first President of the University for about six months, and the school had begun to resemble other young universities of that era. The practices and standards established during Cluff’s administration continued to play a vital role in the evolving history of what would become Brigham Young High School and Brigham Young University. He established the foundation for future accreditation of the University in the 1920s. President Benjamin Cluff, Jr. was followed by President George Brimhall in 1903. Brimhall had served as the fourth Principal of the Academy's high school program from 1895 to 1900. "Benjamin Cluff was a strong and resourceful leader who ranks among the leading educators of Utah," according to Bryant Stringham Hinckley, one of Cluff's former students, who graduated from BYA high school in 1885. "In his prime he was a man to be reckoned with - a good organizer, fearless, and aggressive," said Hinckley. The following are some of the specific innovations and accomplishments of the Cluff administration: • Brigham Young Academy was dissolved in 1903, and was replaced by Brigham Young University and Brigham Young High School. • Class periods were lengthened from one-half hour to one hour, allowing teachers to present more material in a focused time period. • Cluff initiated a summer school to provide in-service continuing education for teachers in the region, and imported leading American educators as instructors. • BY Academy started a formal missionary training program to enhance the effectiveness of new missionaries. • Cluff formed the Student Loan Association, making it easier for students to stay in school until they had completed their programs. • Cluff stressed higher learning among faculty and students; many went east or to California for additional education. • Intercollegiate athletics were introduced to BYA, generating media attention and increased alumni loyalty. • The Athletic Association was organized, promoting safety and academic standards for athletes. • The Academy adopted school colors — blue and white — the first educational institution in Utah to do so. • Annie Pike Greenwood wrote the "College Song." • Class leaders were elected by students, beginning with the Class of 1891. Classes also selected mottos, class colors, and created class banners, fostering lifetime friendships. • Cluff instituted Founders Day, featuring concerts, dances, parades, ball games, athletic meets, cross-country races, and academic processions. • The school's first viable newspaper, the White and Blue, began publication. It became a vehicle for many types of progress. • Cluff persuaded leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to incorporate BY Academy as an officially sponsored organization of the Church, and eventually, to add a university to the school. • The Alumni Association was organized, and it began to hold annual dinners and maintain historical records. • Several new facilities were endowed, including the Holt Laboratory of Physics, the Magleby Laboratory of Chemistry, the Hinckley Laboratory of Natural Sciences, the Beckstead Laboratory of General Mechanics, and the Warren Smith Library of General Science Works. • College Hall with its large auditorium, and the Elementary Training School Building with a gymnasium on its top floor, were built during his administration; the Missionary-Preparatory Building (later known as the Arts Building) was completed nine months after the end of his administration. • The student body grew from 386 to 825; the faculty increased from 28 to 57; and the library expanded from 1,053 to 5,432 volumes. By the time Benjamin Cluff, Jr. completed his tenure on December 23, 1903, the school had become Brigham Young University, and Cluff was its first President. At the request of President Cluff, the change from Brigham Young Academy to Brigham Young University, and Brigham Young University High School, took place on October 3, 1903. In the same year, the Board accepted the resignation of Cluff, and he was formally released on December 23rd, having served the school in various executive positions since 1882, and as President since 1892. Benjamin Cluff Jr. possessed a lifelong desire to do archeological research to prove the veracity of the Book of Mormon. In 1900 President Cluff had been granted a leave of absence to lead a group of explorers on an expedition to South America. Travel to and from the Mormon colonies in Mexico was commonplace in those days, but Mormon exploration beyond the colonies was rare, and Cluff felt that this was the time to begin. On April 17, 1900, a group of well outfitted men left the Academy campus in Provo, led by a brass band and followed by most of the student body, on a march to Spanish Fork. There a grand reception was held, food was served, final speeches were made, and soon the little group departed to continue its trek to Mexico and South America. The full story of this expedition is full of adventures, successes and disappointments, but should be told elsewhere. President Cluff returned to Provo on February 7, 1902, disappointed and without the archeological evidences that he had sought. However, a naturalist on the expedition, Chester Van Buren, went on to Columbia, South America, and remained in the jungles until 1903, returning with some 1200 birds, snakes, mammals, Indian patterns, etc., to fill a museum on campus. This museum was established by Professor Van Buren, Professor Edwin H. Smart, and a student, George Talmage. For many years College Hall had a very lifelike exhibition of the Amazon jungle. After his retirement from BYU, Cluff pursued a life's ambition to find proof or Book of Mormon evidences, and strata in Native American history. He paid all of his debts, gave homage to his colleagues, and moved his large family to Mexico. From there he established a rubber plantation, from which he hoped to launch additional efforts in ancient history. However, he experienced incredible hardships, placed his confidence in people who did not deserve it, and his plantation failed. He suffered massive losses from theft and deception. He eventually left Mexico for California, where he engaged in the grocery business, and served in the Church as occasion presented itself. One of the last Mormon polygamists, Cluff first married Mary Jane John [a BYA student] on August 16, 1883. He second married Harriet Cullmore on December 17, 1886. He third married Florence Reynolds in Mexico. Benjamin Cluff, Jr., died on June 16, 1948 in California at the age of 90 years. For distinguished service to the University, the Church, and his native state, the BYU Alumni Association conferred upon Cluff the Distinguished Service Award in 1946. The University further honored him by naming a new botanical building the "Benjamin Cluff Jr. Plant Science Laboratory", a nursery for the University's expanded landscaping and beautification program, and for the scientific research of three departments: Agronomy, Botany and Horticulture. The Benjamin Cluff Jr. Annual Lecture was established at BYU in 2003. It was designed to bring the nation’s top educators to the BYU campus to expose students to new ideas, and to foster a growing dialogue about how to make education better, an ongoing legacy of the first president of Brigham Young University.

Dusenberry, Warren Newton

Dusenberry, Warren Newton
Provo, Utah US

Warren & Adelaide Dusenberry

Faculty & Staff. Warren N. Dusenberry. First Principal of BY Academy from fall of 1875 until he resigned in spring of 1876. Dusenberry, Warren Newton (1836-1915) -- also known as Warren N. Dusenberry -- of Provo, Utah County, Utah. Born in 1836. Mayor of Provo, Utah, 1892-93. Died in 1915. The founding of Brigham Young Academy in Provo rather than Salt Lake City was undoubtedly due to the educational endeavors of Warren and Wilson Dusenberry. They had founded two schools, both of which were eminently successful, even though they were financially unstable. Warren was first principal of the Timpanogos Branch of the University of Deseret, which later became the University of Utah. The Provo branch had to close because of lack of financial support by the parent institution. Because of his educational experience it was only natural that Warren was chosen as the first principal of BYA, although he made it clear that he would only serve until a permanent principal was appointed. He preferred to go into the practice of law, where he would not have to push wheelbarrows around to collect produce for tuition. He preferred the tumult and the controversy of the law with its financial security to the peace of education with its financial uncertainty. After serving as principal only a few months, Brigham Young's hand-picked choice for principal, Karl G. Maeser, arrived as his successor. ~ ~ ~ ~ Warren Newton Dusenberry was born on November 1, 1836 in Whitehaven, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania [or Easton, Northhampton, Pennsylvania]. His parents were Mahlon Dusenberry and Aurilla Coray Dusenberry. He married Adelaide Elizabeth Webb on June 18, 1865 in Payson, Utah. She was born on April 11, 1845 in Kalamazoo, Michigan, to Pardon Knapp Webb and Clarissa Jane Lee. He died in 1915. ~ ~ ~ ~ Warren Newton Dusenberry Born November 1, 1836 White Haven, Pennsylvania Died March 31, 1915 (aged 78) Warren Newton Dusenberry (November 1, 1836 – March 31, 1915) was the founding principal of Brigham Young Academy in 1876. Dusenberry was only a temporary principal. He also served as County Judge of Utah County and mayor of Provo. Prior to serving as principal of Brigham Young Academy, Dusenberry had been the president of the short-lived Timpanogos Branch of the University of Deseret. Dusenberry was born in White Haven, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. In 1840 he moved with his parents to Pike County, Illinois. Shortly after this his mother joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints but his father did not. Due to this, when the majority of the Latter Day Saints moved to Utah the Dusenberry family remained in Illinois. In 1860, they moved to Los Angeles, California and in 1862 Dusenberry moved with his mother, brother Wilson Dusenberry, and two sisters to Provo, Utah Territory, leaving his father and one brother behind in California. Dusenberry worked as a school teacher and merchant in Provo. He also was baptized a member of the LDS Church. In 1867, he went on a mission to the Southern States. From 1870 to 1875 he was head of the University of Deseret's Timpanogos Branch. After being principal of Brigham Young Academy, Dusenberry became the Utah County Prosecutor and the Provo City Attorney. In 1892 Dusenberry was elected mayor of Provo, defeating Reed Smoot.

Hinckley, Edwin Smith

Hinckley, Edwin Smith
Provo, Utah US

Edwin and Addie Hinckley

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, and Collegiate Class of 1897. Faculty. Edwin Smith Hinckley. Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. He was named Class Orator, and spoke in the Commencement Exercises. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Edwin S. Hinckley. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ B. Y. Academy Class of 1900. S. E. (sic) Hinckley. In 1897 at Commencement Exercises, S. E. Hinckley was called upon to deliver a short speech, since he was the president of the Class of 1900 (freshmen) at that time. [Of course, someone else may have been elected president in the following years.] Source: (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 24, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Geology and Education teacher, 1895-1915. Sixth Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edwin S. Hinckley was born July 21, 1868, in Cove Fort, Utah, the seventh child of pioneer parents, Ira N. and Adelaide Hinckley. They were known as people of refinement, integrity, religion, family, and education. Edwin S. Hinckley attended Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah, and his experiences heightened his interest in higher education. Bryant graduated from BYA high school in 1885 and Edwin in 1886? Edwin was a half brother to Bryant S. Hinckley, and they came to Provo to school together. Edwin married Addie Henry in 1890, and Bryant went on to school in the East and was not married until three years later. Each man remained a teacher and both taught at BYA, Bryant from 1893 to 1900, and Edwin for twenty years. Edwin and his wife Adeline (Addie) Henry Hinckley moved to Ann Arbor, Mich., to pursue additional studies in geology at the University of Michigan; he graduated as class salutatorian. Simultaneously he served a part-time mission. Returning to BYA to teach in 1895, Hinckley served another mission in Colorado. After Brigham Young Academy became BYU in 1903, Hinckley served as Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. For 21 years he inspired students in the classroom, prompting at least one of them, J. Edward Johnson, to write that he "sat as one enchanted all the period he talked to our class, later adding, "One of [his] expressions was, 'Some of you here have it in you to do things which will set waves in motion that will not stop until they break upon the waves of eternity.' "What he taught me in geology has long since ceased to make the slightest difference to me, but the inspiration of his personality and philosophy of life . . . his keen wit and wholesome good humor, continue to fire me with new ambitions." Hinckley, known as the geologist of the university, also served as second counselor, as it was termed then, to BYU president George H. Brimhall. With E.D. Partridge, he laid out the block Y, and was dean of the Church Teachers College. Upon his BYU retirement he served the State Industrial School at Ogden for seven years as superintendent where his management philosophy was "Trust-not punish." He later served as executive director for the Provo City Chamber of Commerce and was a principal participant in major economic development in central Utah. He had served as BYU's Alumni president in 1897 and '98 and continued his affiliation in 1924 and '25 as president a second time. Hinckley died Nov. 15, 1929, leaving a family that included 13 children. In 1954, wanting to express appreciation to their parents, they extended the Hinckley influence by establishing the Edwin Smith Hinckley Scholarship Fund at BYU.

Jensen, Edgar M.

Jensen, Edgar M.
(See Jenson, Edgar Milando)

Edgar Jensen

Principal - See JENSON, Edgar Milando

Jenson, Edgar Milando

Jenson, Edgar Milando
Provo, Utah US

Edgar and Ivie Jenson

Faculty & Staff. Edgar Milando Jensen, M.A. Education teacher, 1916-1917, 1927-1959. Ninth Principal of BY High School from 1928 to 1935, and also Art Instructor. Served as Director of Training Schools after being Principal. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1919. Edgar M. Jenson. He received an MA Degree in Educational Administration in 1919. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 178. ~ ~ ~ ~ According to conflicting records, Edgar Milando (or Malenda) Jenson was born circa 1890-94 in Pine Valley Mountain, Utah, or on Apr 6, 1888, in Ephraim, Sanpete County, Utah. On September 4, 1918, he married Ivie May Gardner [BYU AB Degree 1918] (born 15 Dec 1894 to her parents: Reuben Gardner and Lucy Almira Snow). The children of Edgar and Ivie Jenson included: Nellie Jenson [BYH Class of 1937] (Herman) Adams of Parowan, Utah; Beverly Jenson [BYH Class of 1941] of St. George and Provo, Utah; and Gloria Dawn Jenson [Class of 1946] of Provo. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edgar Jenson was an artist, teacher and educational administrator. Edgar employed Floyd E. Breinholt, artist, to make visual aids for him during depression years. Jenson Publication: Sanpete Tales: Humorous Folklore from Central Utah / by William Jenson Adams; with stories collected by his grandfather, Edgar M. Jenson; and illustrations by Edgar M. Jenson. Call #398.2089 J453s (Snow College - Phillips Library.) ~ ~ ~ ~ Edgar M. Jenson died on May 25, 1958. His wife, Ivie May Gardner Jenson, died on July 21, 1966 in Provo, Utah. [Note: Correct spelling is JENSON not JENSEN.] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY ~ June 6, 1958

Lambert, Asael Carlyle

Lambert, Asael Carlyle
Los Angeles, Utah US

Asael & Florence + 1 Lambert

Faculty & Staff. Eighth Principal of BY High School from 1926 to 1928. Asael Carlyle (A.C.) Lambert was born March 9, 1893 in Kamas, Utah. As the son of a widowed mother he struggled to make the farm support the family. At age seventeen he was called to fill a mission in England. Upon his return he found his mother had remarried and was living in Rexburg, Idaho. Lambert joined his mother there but soon found that he had to make his own way. He took what work was available including the herding of sheep. Within a few years he managed to attend Albion State Normal School for a year and Ricks College for another year and thus earned an elementary school teaching certificate. In turn, he became a teacher of a one-room rural school, a principal, and a county superintendent of schools. On October 8, 1914, he married Florence Smith Ballif in Salt Lake City, Utah. Florence was born September 30, 1896 in Logan, Utah. Her parents were John Lyman Ballif and Emma Gurney Smith Ballif. Florence died in December of 1947 in Safford, Arizona. Asael second married Golda Margaret "Margaret" Sayer Marr on March 18, 1949 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Asael died on April 2, 1983, Los Angeles, California, at age 90. Florence Lambert died in December of 1947 in Safford, Arizona. Florence and Asael had six children: James E. Lambert; Carlyle Ballif (C.B.) Lambert; Barbara Lambert [BYH Class of 1944] (twin); John Lambert (twin, died from scarlet fever when four years of age); Ruth Lambert; and Edith Lambert. Asael's parents were John Benjamin Lambert and Edith Lemon Lambert of Kamas, Utah. Asael second married G. Margaret Sayer Marr. Asael Carlyle Lambert (1893-1983) was a noted figure in education, administration, and planning in Utah, Idaho, and California. Beginning in 1925 he served Brigham Young University as a Professor of Education, including a term as Principal of BY High School from 1926 to 1928, then as Professor of Educational Administration, Dean of the Graduate School, and Administrative Director of the school's libraries until 1950. The highlight of his own education was completion of the Ph.D. degree in educational administration at Stanford University in 1935. Despite limited resources, the necessity to support a family on a very modest salary, and serious illness while at Stanford, he completed the doctoral program with highest academic honors. From 1951 to 1962 he worked at various positions in California for Los Angeles State College. His duties in California from included executive dean and dean of the College, and successively director of the Building Program and Projects of Los Angeles State College, including the San Fernando Valley State College. The A. C. Lambert Papers (Ms 35) are collected at the University of Utah Marriott Library, Manuscripts Division. The A. C. Lambert Papers (1929-1972) document the lifetime search of Asael Carlyle Lambert that began when, as a teacher of comparative religion at Brigham Young University, he sought answers to questions propounded by his students. Part of the collection covers the history and development of early Mormon scriptures. The documents also trace the economic, political, and sociological situations of the Mormon church, including Joseph Smith, Jr., and his life and activities pursuant to the founding and development of Mormonism. There is material dealing with practices, rituals, and doctrines propounded by the Church's early leaders. The material includes a comparative study of Mormonism with Freemasonry, other secret societies, and quasi-religious organizations. Present are Lambert's notebooks, as well as documents relating to the study of Utah's school system -- taxation, teachers, buildings, and administration -- made by a Utah School Study Committee during the administration of Governor George D. Clyde. An indexed register is available. ~ ~ ~ ~ A personal biographical essay by Roald F. Campbell is titled "A. C. Lambert: Teacher, Scholar, and Friend" and was published the periodical: Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought, 17.1 (Spring): pages 113-116. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY OF HIS FIRST WIFE: Provo, December 27, 1947 -- Mrs. Florence Ballif Lambert, 51, wife of Dr. A.C. Lambert, dean of the summer school and professor of educational administration at Brigham Young University, died Saturday at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Mark Nielson, Safford, Arizona, following a lengthy illness. A prominent and active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Mrs. Lambert was born September 30, 1896 in Logan, Utah, a daughter of John Lyman Ballif and Emma Smith Ballif. Educated in Rexburg, Idaho schools, she later attended BYU, and was married to Dr. Lambert on Oct 8, 1914 in the Salt Lake LDS temple. She was active in BYU women’s circles, LDS Relief society, and Daughters of the Utah Pioneers as well as primary and singing mothers organizations. Surviving are her husband; two sons and three daughters, James E. Lambert, Palo Alto, California; Carlyle B. Lambert and Mrs. Keith (Barbara) Jolley, Provo, Utah; Mrs. Mark (Edith) Nielson, Safford, Arizona; Mrs. William (Ruth) Roy, Lake City, Florida; nine grandchildren, and three brothers and three sisters, Dr. J. L. Ballif, Salt Lake City; George S. Ballif and Dr. Ariel Ballif, Provo; Mrs. Claremond Yearsley, and Mrs. Harriett Barrett, Menan, Idaho, and Mrs Elsie Barrett, Boise, Idaho. Funeral services will be announced by the Claudin funeral home. [Salt Lake Tribune, December 1947]

Maeser, Karl Gottfried (1828 - 1901)

Maeser, Karl Gottfried (1828 - 1901)
Provo, Utah US

Karl & Anna & Emilie Maeser

One of the First BYA Faculty & Staff. Karl G. Maeser, Pedagogy, 1876-1892. Legendary Second Principal of BY Academy from 1876 to 1892. Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1891 to 1901. ~~~~ Karl Gottfried Maeser, the first principal of Brigham Young University and general superintendent of the LDS Church school system, was born on 16 January 1828 in Saxony, Germany. He graduated with high honors from the Friedrichstadt Schullehrerseminar, a teacher-training college in Dresden, in May 1848. He worked as a teacher in Dresden, as a private tutor in Bohemia, and as vice-director of a school in Dresden. He married Anna Mieth, the school director's daughter, in 1854. Maeser first heard of the LDS Church through an anti-Mormon pamphlet. Rather than turning him away, it piqued his interest, and he wrote for more information. After some effort on his part, missionaries finally agreed to come to Dresden to teach him, and in October 1855 he was baptized. The LDS Church organized a branch in Dresden with the eight members, and Maeser was sustained as presiding elder. Like other Mormons, Maeser wanted to immigrate to "Zion"--that is, Utah. Although he left Germany in 1856, he did not arrive in Utah until 1860. In the years between he served a church mission to Scotland, organized church branches and labored with Germans in London area, worked in Philadelphia to earn money to go west, and served a mission in Virginia. After arriving in Utah, Maeser renewed his work as a teacher and school administrator. He helped organize schools in the Fifteenth and Twentieth wards in Salt Lake City and tutored Brigham Young's children; he also worked as Tabernacle organist and as an accountant. After serving a mission to Germany and Switzerland from 1867 to 1870, he taught briefly at the University of Deseret. He later returned to the Twentieth Ward Seminary. In 1875 he married Emilie Damke, a German immigrant, as a plural wife. In 1875 Brigham Young purchased the financially troubled Timpanogos branch of the University of Deseret and changed its name to the Brigham Young Academy. He asked Maeser in 1876 to go to Provo to establish a church school, explaining, "Brother Maeser, I want you to remember that you ought not to teach even the alphabet or the multiplication tables without the Spirit of God." During the next sixteen years, Maeser struggled to build a school. Initially, he was not only the principal, but also the teacher, chorister, organist, janitor, recruiter, fund-raiser, and fan club. He took the school from a small student body of only twenty-nine students who academically were only at the fifth reader level to an enrollment of more than 400 students in several departments including a normal school. Under his direction, Brigham Young Academy became one of the principal schools in the Utah Territory. Maeser was able to combine academic concerns, religious beliefs, and character development as part of the students' education. Maeser was appointed the first general superintendent of LDS Church schools in 1888, but he was not released from his responsibilities at the Brigham Young Academy until 1892. In 1889 the Mormon Church Board of Education gave Maeser a degree of Doctor of Letters and Didactics. He published his views of education in School and Fireside in 1898. Maeser died on 15 February 1901. It was not uncommon for Karl G. Maeser and his staff to receive less than one-half pay during the 1880s. The faith of BYU’s founders was never stronger than during times of crisis. I was particularly impressed with Karl G. Maeser’s conviction as he responded to Reed Smoot, a student, during the 1884 fire that destroyed the Academy’s only building. As it became apparent that they could not save the Lewis building, the student said to Maeser, “Oh, Brother Maeser, the Academy is burned!” Maeser responded, “No such thing, it’s only the building.” Six years earlier, shortly after the death of Brigham Young, Maeser had a dream in which President Young showed him the design of a new building. At the time Brother Maeser did not understand the purpose of the dream. Six years later, as he looked at the charred ruins of Lewis Hall, he could see in his mind’s eye the building that would take its place. Each time a crisis threatened the survival of the school, the heavens were opened and instructions given. Principal Maeser’s dream about the new building was the first. A second occurred a few years later in the mid-1880s. During one of the darkest hours, when it seemed that the school would close, Brigham Young appeared to President John Taylor, assuring him of the school’s importance in the kingdom and giving him instructions for its survival. In the dream President Young said that “Christ himself was directing, and had a care over [the] school.” See also.

McConkie, Don Leo

McConkie, Don Leo
Provo, Utah US

Don and Grace McConkie

Faculty & Staff, 1950s continuing through 1968. Don L. McConkie. Problems of Democracy, Student Government, 9th Grade Core, Social Studies. Sixteenth Principal of BY High School from 1956 to 1957. Head of the BYH History Department. ~ ~ ~ ~ Don Leo McConkie was born August 23, 1903 in Vernal, Utah. His parents: John Luther McConkie and Eliza Hellen Holyoak McConkie. Don married Grace Pickup -- she was born July 21, 1903 and died April 26, 1993. Her parents: Clarence Ray Pickup and Vilate Celestia Batty. 1954 - 1968 - Don served as Social Studies & History Master Teacher at BYH. Former principal in Uinta School District, became social science instructor at BYH in 1954, BYH principal in 1956-57 school year. He received his bachelor degree from BYU in 1926 and in 1942 earned his masters degree, also from BYU. In addition to his work from 1928 to 1941 in Vernal, he taught social science at Provo's Dixon Junior High School for 11 years. For two years he was president of the Social Science Dept. of Utah Education Association. He was a past president of both the Uinta and Provo teacher's associations. On one list Don McConkie is shown as a member of the BYH Class of 1947 -- that was actually his son, Don Clayton McConkie, known as Clayton. Don L. McConkie died on December 23, 1994 in Provo, Utah. See Don L. McConkie biography.

Nelson, H. David [Horace David]

Nelson, H. David [Horace David]
Idaho Falls, Idaho US

H. David & Doris G. Nelson

Faculty & Staff. 20th Principal of BY High School, serving from 1962 to 1964. H. David Nelson [Horace David Nelson], was born in 1926 to Horace Jacob Nelson and Etta Lavern Goates Nelson. The Nelson family lived in LaGrande, Oregon for 55 years. H. J. and Etta Nelson had three children: a daughter: Etta Mae Nelson who married William L. Thomson, Jr. [West Valley City, Utah]; and two sons: Ralph Glen Nelson who married Sharon [Lindon, Utah]; and Horace David Nelson who married Doris G. [Idaho Falls, Idaho]. ~ ~ ~ ~ H. David Nelson earned his junior college certificate from Eastern Oregon University in 1948, followed by his bachelor’s in 1952 and master’s in 1954. He attended BYU in 1962. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: H. David Nelson, 87, of Idaho Falls, passed peacefully from this life Monday, February 11, 2013, surrounded by loving family. He was born January 18, 1926, in La Grande, Oregon, to H. Jacob Nelson and Etta Goates Nelson. He was the oldest of three children and attended schools in La Grande. He received his B.S. and Master of Education degrees from Eastern Oregon University. David served honorably during World War II as a radar specialist in the U.S. Navy, where he formed lifelong friendships. He was happy to serve his country and later was a key organizer of reunions with his fellow shipmates from the USS Freestone. After service to his country came to an end, he chose to serve the Lord as an LDS missionary in South Africa from 1949 to 1951. David married his eternal sweetheart, Doris L. Godfrey, on August 12, 1953, in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple. They lived in Pendleton, Oregon, where he taught school. They then moved to Ammon, Idaho, where he worked in administrative roles in District 93. They later moved to Provo, Utah, where he was principal of BYU High School, and then returned to Idaho Falls to work for District 91 in various administrative positions, where he retired in 1991. He enjoyed working with high school students and is fondly remembered by many of them. After retirement, he worked as a student-teaching supervisor for BYU-Idaho, ISU, Lewis and Clark State College and BYU. David had many interests but was most passionate about the magnificent gardens he grew every summer. His greatest joy was his family. He was a devoted husband, father and grandfather. He was a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and actively served in various positions at both the ward and stake levels. He and his beloved wife greatly enjoyed serving an LDS mission together in the South Africa Johannesburg Mission. David is survived by his wife of 59 years, Doris; and their five children, CarolAnn Nelson(Neal) Clinger of Idaho Falls, Brent (Laurie) Nelson of Nampa, Idaho, Linda Nelson (Greg) Harvey of West Des Moines, Iowa, Janet Nelson (Tyrie) Barrott of Idaho Falls and Diane Nelson (Kelly) Kunz of Murray, Utah; 17 grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and his brother, Ralph G. Nelson of Lindon, Utah. He was preceded in death by his parents and his sister, Mae Thomson. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, February 16, 2013, at the Idaho Falls 31st Ward, 1165 Azalea Drive, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Interment, Ammon, Idaho Cemetery. The family suggests that contributions may be made to the LDS Missionary Fund. Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.coltrinmortuary.com [Idaho Falls Idaho Post Register, February 14, 2013]

Nelson, Nels Lars

Nelson, Nels Lars
Provo, Utah US

N. L. & Maude Nelson

BY Academy High School Class of 1882, Collegiate Class of 1887. Faculty. Nels Nelson. Graduated June 16, 1882. 21 members of the Class of 1882 are mentioned. Source 1: Deseret Evening News, June 19, 1882. Source 2: Territorial Enquirer, June 21, 1882. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Nels L. Nelson. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Mentioned as a continuing Normal student in the 1881 Principal's Report of Karl G. Maeser, The Territorial Enquirer, Provo, Utah, June 22, 1881. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Nels L. Nelson, English and Spanish teacher, 1883-1920. Fifth Principal of Brigham Young Academy from 1900 to 1904. He married Maude Noble , who was was born on February 1, 1879 in Kanab, Kane County, Utah. She died on January 9, 1954 in Downey, Bannock County, Idaho and was buried in Downey. Nels Lars Nelson married Maude on May 25, 1904 in Salt Lake City, Utah. An incident in the Onedia Stake Academy in Preston, Idaho: Mark Hart remembered his former teacher N. L. Nelson. "Man, how he could concentrate!" he recalled. "When he had his nose in a book he was gone. I whispered to a kid next to me. I'll bet I can sneak right out of that window and he'll never notice. "I inched over to the wall, like this, stopped and checked him -- he was still lost -- and then I inched along some more. I slipped out the open window, went around to the front steps, into the hall, then sneaked back into my seat. He didn't notice at all." ~ ~ ~ ~ After serving as principal at BY Academy in Provo, Nels Lars Nelson became a BYU English professor, and in 1904, he became the editor of a new periodical. It was called The Mormon Point of View. After only four issues the publication ceased. A single bound volume of The Mormon Point of View can be found in the UCLA Research Library. In 1898, Nels Lars Nelson had published Preaching and Public Speaking, an effort to provide useful advice and raise the level of preaching in the church. In 1904, he also published Scientific Aspects of Mormonism. Brother Nelson, usually known by his initials N. L., had a lively, inquiring mind and a vigorous, compelling style of writing. During its brief lifetime, The Mormon Point of View published nine articles, stories, or poems, including: --"Human Side of the Book of Mormon." Here Nelson explored the textual changes, mostly grammatical, in subsequent editions after 1830. Inevitably, he also addressed the nature of the translation and the presence of Bible passages in the Book of Mormon. Not the last word, this article is nevertheless provocative and worth reading. --"Learning to Read Up Hill." Someone complained that the new magazine was too difficult. Editor Nelson was unsympathetic. "I cannot and will not reduce the whole thing down to thin soup once more, to suit his watery mental digestion," he wrote. I wonder what he would say about the non-readers among us a century later, those whose intake of ideas comes from movies and television. --"The Spiritual Life." Analyzing several metaphors employed by Jesus, Nelson went on for 78 pages. =="The Harris-Anthon Episode." Martin Harris and Charles Anthon both told about the famous interview. Since Anthon contradicted himself, Nelson said, Harris is the more reliable. He was sufficiently satisfied after meeting to invest a sizeable sum of money in the publication of the Book of Mormon. --"The Mormon Family." Although plural marriage is briefly mentioned, the main point of this article is to praise the "fruitfulness" of Mormon families. A century later, when fertility in many countries is below the 2.1 required for replacement, we are awed as Nelson describes families of five to twelve children for each mother. -- A short story by a young woman in one of Nelson's classes rounded out the contents of the periodical's first and only volume. Nelson had hoped to sell two thousand copies, which would have returned a modest profit to him as editor. He did not come even close to his goal, and the venture failed financially. N. L. Nelson had built up a sufficient reputation for loyalty that the First Presidency gave his project their endorsement. But in their letter we notice a recognition of the financial risks. "As far as we are concerned, we should very much like to see a magazine published such as you have outlined; it would undoubtedly be a credit both to you as its publisher and to our community. But will it pay financially, and can it be done without financial injury to yourself and family? . . . To be frank with you, we are afraid it will not pay." They were right. After the fourth issue, completing the first volume, The Mormon Point of View folded.

Shirts, Morris Alpine

Shirts, Morris Alpine
Cedar City, Utah

Morris and Maxine Shirts

Faculty & Staff. Fifteenth Principal of BY High School from 1954 to 1956. ~ ~ ~ ~ Dr. Morris A. Shirts served as Fifteenth Principal of Brigham Young High School. His term began in 1954-1955 and ended at the completion of the 1955-1956 academic year. Principal Shirts was known as a rather humane administrator, somewhat lenient and understanding of the student position in his use of discipline. Because of this, he was ultimately more popular with the students than with the faculty. The role that he played in the historic BYH Assembly Crisis of 1955-1956 is a good illustration of this. This event led to the imposition of something akin to martial law at BYH assemblies from the autumn of 1956 to the spring of 1968. Morris A. Shirts was born on April 11, 1922 in Escalante, Utah, to Morris and LoNeta Hall Shirts. He graduated from Escalante High School, then attended Dixie College, before receiving his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from Brigham Young University. In 1952 he received an Ed.D. from Indiana University. He met Dorothy Maxine Baird, of Salt Lake City, in 1943 while they were attending Brigham Young University. Shortly after they met he was called to serve in the U.S. Air Force, where he became a radio operator on B-29s. He experienced many life-threatening situations during the 2 1/2 years he served. In 1945 he and his B-59 crew flew over the Battleship Missouri during the signing of the peace treaty to end World War II. He still maintains contact with several members of that crew. He and Maxine were married October 27, 1945 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. They both then continued their educations at BYU. After graduation, he taught math and science at North Sanpete High School, and was audio visual director for the school district. While at Mt. Pleasant, he started the first high school radio station in Utah (KNS). Two of his students went on to significant broadcasting careers in the State of Utah. In 1952, Dr. Shirts was hired by BYU to teach in the Audio Visual Department. He attracted the attention of BYU administrators with his academic and administrative skills, and several years later they chose him to serve as Principal of BY High School. He was well liked and appreciated by the students of BYH during his tenure as Principal. After leaving BYH, Dr. Shirts served as an advisor to the National Teachers College in Teheran, Iran from 1957 to 1959. He came to the two-year College of Southern Utah in 1959, where he was head of the Audio Visual Department, Department Chair and later Dean of the College of Education. He was instrumental in earning state approval to promote CSU to a four-year college. Dr. Shirts retired from his academic career in 1983, but continued as an avid historian, especially about Southern Utah, and was a popular speaker for local and visiting groups. He co-authored, with Paul Dean Proctor, a book about Silver Reef titled Silver, Sinners and Saints: A History of Old Silver Reef, Utah. It is an account of the discovery, disbelief, re-discovery, and development of silver mining in Southern Utah. For three decades he worked on a second book, this one about the settling of Cedar City, titled Trial Furnace: The Story of the Iron Mission. The book was completed by Kathryn Shirts and published by Deseret Book. Morris Shirts authored the article "Mountain Meadows Massacre," in the Utah History Encyclopedia, Allan Kent Powell, ed. (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1994), pp. 384--85. The Southern Utah University Press published another collaboration, A New Look at Old Sites on Mountain Meadows by Morris A. Shirts and Frances Anne Smeath. Because of his interest in the Mountain Meadows Massacre, Dr. Shirts was a founding member of the Mountain Meadows Monument Committee. Morris spent a great part of his life in volunteer service to boys. He coached baseball for 19 years, part of a commitment to be close to his four sons. He wrote Warm Up For Little League, published in several editions, and Call It Right! with Kent Myers and Klein Rollo, to help Little League baseball umpires. He also wrote Playing With A Football with Thomas Kingsford. He served as Scoutmaster of the Cedar City 7th Ward with as many as 53 Scouts in the troop. An Eagle Scout himself, he patiently helped many boys follow the trail to Eagle, sixteen of them receiving the award in one memorable court of honor. Troop 347 was honored as being one of the outstanding troops in the LDS Church twice during this period. Morris was president of the Cedar Breaks District BSA and vice president of the Utah National Parks Council, BSA. He worked tirelessly for three years to help obtain the Thunder Ridge Scout Camp near Brian Head Ski Resort for the BSA and helped to arrange for the National Guard to put in an access road as a training exercise. He and his assistants were honored with a dinner and tribute by some of these former scouts. For his lifetime of work in Scouting he was honored with the Silver Beaver Award. He actively served in many positions in the LDS Church including counselor in the Cedar West Stake presidency and temple ordinance worker. Morris represented Southern Utah on the Utah Governor Committee for the National Bicentennial in 1976. He received innumerable awards from many organizations. He had many hobbies, including: photography -- he filmed football and basketball games for both BYU and SUU--, and singing, playing guitar and harmonica, constructing bows and arrows for archery hunting, operating a ham radio station, and rebuilding Studebaker's -- he restored at least a dozen over the years. However his most cherished time was spent with his family. He was proud of their achievements and attended as many of their games and activities as possible. Former BYH Principal Morris Alpine Shirts died on January 7, 1997, at his home in Cedar City, Iron County, Utah, at the age of 75. He was survived by his wife, Maxine, of Cedar City; four sons and one daughter: Russell Shirts (Marilyn), St. George, Utah; Randy Shirts (Kathryn), Provo, Utah; Robert Shirts (Janet), Fillmore, Utah; Steve Shirts (Jill) of Cedar City; and Andrea Shirts, also of Cedar City; by 21 grandchildren; two sisters, Nadine Shirts Anderson, Orem, Utah; and Carol Joy Shirts Roundy, Taft, California. A memorial service for Dr. Shirts was held in Cedar City on Saturday, January 11, 1997. He was buried at Cedar City, with military honors. [Thanks to the Deseret News, Friday, January 10, 1997]

Sorenson, Wayne L.

Sorenson, Wayne L.
Hayward, California

Wayne and Lael Sorenson

Faculty & Staff. Thirteenth Principal of BY High School from 1950 to 1952. In 1947-1948 he taught Science & Mathematics at BYH. Guidance Counselor. Taught 1952-1953. Wayne L. Sorenson died on August 26, 2004 at 88 years of age. Wayne was born August 21, 1916 in Malad, Idaho, the oldest of 10 children from parents Golden Sorenson and Ione Blasdell Sorenson. His childhood was divided between homesteading farmland in the Pocatello Valley and an earnest pursuit of learning and education. Early on, Wayne distinguished himself during difficult times with the capacity for hard work, shouldering responsibilities with his large family. Wayne graduated from Brigham Young University in 1940 and married Lael Ellertson, June 6, 1940. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. Wayne was a life-long teacher and educator, touching thousands of students, parents and teachers during his long professional career. He started teaching in 1940 and in 1952 [actually 1950 through 1952] was appointed principal of BYU High School in Provo, Utah. Soon after, he went to Stanford University, earning a doctorate in 1956. Wayne worked in many capacities at the Hayward Unified School District, retiring in 1977 as Assistant Superintendent. He loved numbers and quantifying natural events. Wayne enjoyed gardening, was an amateur weatherman and became a Bay Area earthquake expert. Wayne is survived by Lael, his loving wife of more than 64 years, and his children, Jan Berry-Kadrie and Alex Kadrie of Woodacre, CA; Boyd and Liane Sorenson of Hockessin, Delaware; and Diane and Kent Sanders of Walport, Oregon. Wayne and Lael have 8 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren. Memorial Services were held at at the LDS Ward House, Fremont, CA. Burial was at the Mona, Utah Cemetery.

Stutz, Rowan Coombs

Stutz, Rowan Coombs
Midvale, Utah US

Rowan Stutz

Faculty & Staff. Fourteenth Principal of BY High School from 1952 to 1954. Rowan Coombs Stutz, Born: 25 Sep 1916, Cardston, Alberta, Canada. Died: 5 Aug 1983, Midvale, Utah. His parents: Joseph Reuben Stutz and Clara McLean Coombs Stutz. Author: There Must Be A Better Way: An educational information system for state education agencies, by Rowan C. Stutz. Author: LB1140.2 .E178 -- Early Childhood Education : Promising practices in rural areas / Rowan C. Stutz and Dwayne J. Schmaltz.

Thomson, Lowell Dee

Thomson, Lowell Dee
Provo, Utah US

Lowell and Ruth Thomson

Faculty & Staff. Lowell D. Thomson. Twenty-First and final Principal of BY High School, serving from 1964 to 1968. Math and Science teacher 1961-1962. BYHS Curriculum Writer 1962-1963. Married Ruth Morley Thomson. They are the parents of Cynthia Thomson, BYH Class of 1966. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lowell Dee Thomson: BYU BA 1958. Veteran, military service. Lowell Dee Thomson, born 19 Aug 1924, in Eureka, Juab County, Utah. Died 26 Aug 1984, in Provo, Utah. Interment, Orem, Utah. His parents: Niels Kimball Thomson, and Dorcas Beata Olsen Thomson. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Early Life: Ruth was born November 15, 1927, in Santa Barbara, California, to Orlando Isaac Morley and Edith Othine Christiansen Morley. She had one sister. Her father was a butcher and during the depression years their family moved frequently until they moved to Eureka, California, in 1939, where Ruth grew up. Life's Work/Service/Interests: In February of 1945, she met “a tall skinny sailor” and on July 16, 1945, she married Lowell Dee Thomson in the Manti Utah LDS Temple. Lowell and Ruth moved to Utah in 1957 and to Orem in 1959 where she lived the remainder of her life. They have 10 children, 45 grandchildren, and 88 great-grandchildren, with a great-grandchild and their first great-great-grandchild on the way. Lowell passed away on August 26, 1984. Ruth was an accomplished pianist and taught piano lessons in her home for many years. She also was an accomplished seamstress and an avid genealogist; she enjoyed gathering and writing family histories. She was an exceptional homemaker working tirelessly for her family. She also worked in her father’s butcher shop during World War II, and much later, at ZCMI and Utah Valley Regional Medical Center. Ruth was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and had a firm testimony of her Savior, Jesus Christ, and of his gospel as taught in the LDS Church. She served faithfully in many church callings including Young Women President, two times as ward Relief Society President and as a counselor in a stake Relief Society presidency. Beloved mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, Ruth Elaine Morley Thomson quietly passed away at a daughter’s home in Orem, Utah, in the early morning hours of Thursday, July 2, 2015, due to advanced Alzheimer’s Disease. She was 87. Preceded In Death By: Her parents; her husband, Lowell; daughter, Laurie; great-grandson, Ryder Cannon; and older sister, LaVerle Morley Nielsen. Services: Orem North LDS Stake Center. Mortuary: Walker Sanderson Funeral Home. [Provo Daily Herald, July 5, 2015] Source.

Tucker, John Winn

Tucker, John Winn
Michigan City, Indiana US

John and LaVora Tucker

Faculty & Staff, Late 1950s, including 1957-58. John W. Tucker. BYU BA English 1951. He served as the 17th Principal of Brigham Young University High School, from 1957-1958. He left in the fall of 1958 to take the position of Superintendent of the Idaho Falls School District. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Winn Tucker was born on January 10, 1926 to Wilhelm Paul Tucker & Doris Marie Winn in Salt Lake City, Utah. He married LaVora Murray [BYU 1957] on May 26, 1953 in Las Vegas, Nevada. He died on December 18, 2001 in Wheeling, Cook County, Illinois. His interment, Michigan City, La Porte County, Indiana. ~ ~ ~ ~ John W. Tucker was one of seven BYU graduates honored with the 2001 Emeritus Award, for making a significant difference in his community, state and beyond. Award recipients included Andrew H. Barnum, Max J. Berryessa, Elder Eran A. Call, Grace Guymon Jones, Robert J. Matthews, John W. Tucker, and Grant M. Wilson. ~ ~ ~ ~ John W. Tucker, BYU '51, EdD Harvard, PhD Columbia Pacific, spent most of his professional life in education. He was chancellor of Purdue University North Central from 1972 to 1982, where he also taught until 1991. He served as deputy executive vice president at the University of Utah, and president of the College of Eastern Utah. In his retirement years, this Michigan City, Indiana, resident remained active in a clinical psychotherapy practice in Chicago. He was a diplomat of the American Board of Medical Psychotherapy. ~ ~ ~ ~ 1993: College of Eastern Utah President Michael A. Petersen announced that the first endowed teaching chair has been established at the college, thanks to a $50,000 contribution from John W. Tucker and his wife LaVora. Tucker served as president of CEU from 1962 to 1970 and retired as Chancellor of Purdue University. The endowment is known as the LaVora Murray Tucker Chair of Social Ethics, in honor of Tucker's wife. ``I hope this gift will inspire others to establish similar endowments and assist the College of Eastern Utah to become one of the outstanding teaching colleges in the nation,'' Tucker said. Each year a faculty member at the college will be selected for his/her teaching abilities and will be named the LaVora Murray Tucker Professor of Social Ethics. In addition to their regular salary, the selected faculty member will also receive an annual stipend from the interest earned by the endowment. ~ ~ ~ ~ MEMORIAL RESOLUTION OF PURDUE UNIVERSITY for John W. Tucker, Former Chancellor and Professor of Educational Administration at Purdue North Central. January 10, 1926 - December 18, 2001. John Winn Tucker, 75, Michigan City, died Tuesday, December 18, 2001 in Wheeling, Illinois. He was born January 10, 1926 in Salt Lake City to Wilhelm Paul Tucker and Doris (Winn) Tucker. On May 25, 1953, in Las Vegas, he married LaVora Mae Murray, who survives. Survivors also include five daughters, Kerstin Severin, Shawna Monson, Travis Gunnell, Stacy Andrew and Mylese Reyes; 13 grandchildren; two brothers, Clyde Tucker and Wilhelm (Billy) Tucker; and one sister, Veloy Bollinger. John Tucker felt that learning, teaching and serving were central to his life and career. He was the first in his family to go to college. His long career in education took him to positions in St. George, Utah; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Provo, Utah; Price, Utah; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Westville, Indiana. His positions included classroom instructor, school superintendent, dean of students, president of the College of Eastern Utah, vice president at the University of Utah, and Chancellor and Professor of Educational Administration at Purdue University North Central. John Tucker served in the Navy during World War II and returned to Utah to attend Brigham Young University and complete his bachelor’s degree. He received his master’s degree from Arizona State University and was awarded an Ed.D. from Harvard University. He also did postdoctorate studies at Oxford. John Tucker served as Chancellor of Purdue University North Central from 1972 until 1979. His tenure as Chancellor saw the approval and implementation of six technology AS degree programs and the AS degree Nursing program, all in 1972. The Library-Student-Faculty building (LSF) was constructed under Tucker’s leadership. On March 21, 1975, the new building, with library space for 125,000 books and 1,000 periodicals, was dedicated. The campus grew from 1,354 students in 1972 to 2,015 students in 1979. Dr. Tucker also served the North Central campus as Professor of Educational Administration teaching in the Organizational Leadership and Supervision program from 1979 through 1991 when he retired from the academic world. A devout member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Dr. Tucker served a two-year mission in Sweden, and served during his life as high priest, high counselor, and branch president in addition to many and varied church positions. Since retirement, he commuted to the LDS temple in Chicago over a period of seven years to do volunteer work there. At the time of his death he was completing a full time 18-month mission at that temple with his wife. Dr. John Tucker was a member of Kiwanis Club and Rotary Club, where he served a term as president. He was a member of the board of the Barker Foundation in Michigan City, and was appointed by the governor of Indiana to the New Harmony Historic Commission. He also was named by Dan Valentine in the Salt Lake Tribune as “Best Dressed Educator in Utah.” ~ ~ Richard L. Taylor. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: John Winn Tucker. SOUTH BEND, Ind. - Teaching and serving were central to the life and career of John Winn Tucker, who died Dec. 18, 2001. Born on Jan. 10, 1926 in Salt Lake City to Wilhelm Paul and Doris Winn Tucker, he was the first in his family to go to college. He went on to navigate the difficult waters of college administration on the campuses of the 1960s and '70s and was devoted to the idea that learning should be a joyous experience and, that given time, "anyone can learn anything if you want to bad enough." His long career in education took him to positions in St. George; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Provo; Price; Salt Lake City; and Westville, Indiana. His positions included classroom instructor, principal, school superintendent, dean of students, president of the College of Eastern Utah, vice president at the University of Utah, and chancellor at Purdue University North Central. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and returned to Utah to attend Brigham Young University and complete his bachelor's degree. He received his master's degree from Arizona State University and was awarded an Ed.D. from Harvard University. He also did post-doctorate studies at Oxford. He was a devout member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served a two-year mission in Sweden and served during his life as high priest, high counselor and branch president in addition to many and varied church positions. Since retirement, he commuted to the LDS temple in Chicago, Illinois, over a period of seven years to do volunteer work there. At the time of his death, he was completing a full-time 18-month mission at that temple with his wife of 48 years, LaVora. His civic activities included membership in Kiwanis and Rotary Club, where he served a term as president. He was a member of the board of the Barker Foundation in Michigan City, Ind., and was appointed by the governor of Indiana to the New Harmony Historic Commission. He was also named by Dan Valentine in the Salt Lake Tribune as "best-dressed educator in Utah." Family members include wife, LaVora Mae (Murray); five daughters, Kerstin Tucker Severin, Shawna Tucker Monson, Travis Tucker Gunnell, Stacy Tucker Andre, and Mylese Tucker Reyes; 13 grandchildren; two brothers, Clyde Tucker and Wilhelm "Billy" Tucker; and sister, Veloy Bollinger. Funeral services were held on Saturday, December 22, 2001, at the Valparaiso Chapel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Valparaiso, Indiana. The family suggested memorial donations to either the Community College of Salt Lake City, Darrell K. Murray Scholarship Fund, 4600 S. Redwood Road, Salt Lake City, Utah 84130, or to the College of Eastern Utah, John Cronk Scholarship Fund, Price, Utah 84501. [Sun Advocate, Price, Utah, December 25, 2001]

Woolf, Golden LeGrand

Woolf, Golden LeGrand
Provo, Utah US

Golden and Beth Woolf

Faculty & Staff. Tenth Principal of BY High School from 1934-1935 to 1945-1946. Taught French and Theology on the BYH faculty during the 1933-1936 school years. C. L. Jensen served as Acting Principal for a time, including 1938-1939. Golden L. Woolf was born December 13, 1891 in Millville, Utah. His spouse: Beth Coombs Woolf. His parents: Martin Woolf & Roseltha Hyde Woolf. Served as president of the French Mission of the LDS Church from 1929 to 1933. Publications in BYU Archives: Woolf, Golden L., Dr., Records, 1957-1961. 3 boxes (1.5 linear ft.). Call Number: UA 576, Abstract: Includes correspondence, financial records and other materials relating to the Point Four Program in Iran. Also includes contracts between the National Teacher's College and the Division of Education. Golden LeGrand Woolf died October 11, 1966 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery, Block 1 Lot 8. ~ ~ ~ ~ NEWS ITEM: "Golden L. Woolf Assumes Duties as Principal of High School. Golden L. Woolf, formerly of Brigham Young University in Provo, arrived in the City on February 7 to assume duties as principal of the Topaz City High School, it was revealed by LeGrand Noble, superintendent of schools. Dr. Woolf, who is on indefinite leave from BYU as professor of secondary education and from Brigham Young High School as principal, received his A.B. and M.A. from BYU and his Ph.D. degree in education from the University of Califoria in 1940. He is at present in Provo attending the wedding of his son." [Topaz Times, Saturday, February 20, 1943.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Golden Legrand Woolf was born on December 13, 1891 in Millville, Cache County, Utah. His parents were Martin Woolf and Roseltha Hyde. He married Fanny Elizabeth (Beth) Coombs on March 31, 1916 in Cardston, Alberta, Canada. He died on October 11, 1966 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. His wife, Fanny Elizabeth (Beth) Coombs was born June 6, 1893 in Nephi, Utah. Her parents were Mark Anthony Coombs and Henrietta McCune. Beth Coombs Wolf died on October 6, 1974 in Mesa, Arizona. Her interment, Provo, Utah. Golden and Beth Woolf had three children, including Aenone Woolf Christensen [BYH Class of 1935]; Wilbur C. Woolf [BYH Class of 1936]; and Henry McCune (Mac) Woolf [BYH Class of 1940].