Trustees BYA-BYH 1876-1968


Alphabetical Alumni
Harrington, Leonard E.

Harrington, Leonard E.
American Fork, Utah US

Leonard Harrington

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1875 to 1883. Leonard E. Harrington, a member of the original BYA Board of Trustees, was born January 7, 1816, in New York State. He arrived in Utah on October 1, 1847, with the Edward Hunter Company. He was chairman of the judiciary committee of the Territorial Legislature for 28 years, mayor of American Fork, and promoter of the first Utah free school in 1866.

Hinckley, Gordon Bitner

Hinckley, Gordon Bitner
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Gordon B. & Marjory Hinckley

Board of Trustees, 1961 to present. On January 27, 2008, President Gordon B. Hinckley died at the age of ninety-seven while surrounded by family Salt Lake City. According to a Church spokesman, his death was due to "causes incident to age." President Gordon B. Hinckley, world leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, had been ordained and set apart as the 15th President of the Church on Sunday, March 12, 1995. He had earlier served 14 years as a counselor in the First Presidency, the top governing body of the Church, and as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles for 20 years prior to that. His Church service has been extensive. He was called as a member of the Sunday School General Board in 1937, two years after returning home from missionary service in Great Britain. For 20 years, he directed all Church public communications. In 1951 he was named executive secretary of the General Missionary Committee, managing the entire missionary program of the Church, and served in this capacity for seven years. He was president of the East Millcreek Stake in Salt Lake City when he was called as a General Authority in the capacity of an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on April 6, 1958. President Hinckley was named to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on October 5, 1961. On July 23, 1981, he was called into the First Presidency to serve as Counselor and on December 2, 1982, was named Second Counselor to President Spencer W. Kimball. He served as First Counselor to President Ezra Taft Benson from November 1985 to May 30, 1994. On June 5, 1994, he was called as the First Counselor to President Howard W. Hunter. He was also ordained and set apart as the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. As a member of the First Presidency, he has had a major role in administering both the ecclesiastical and temporal affairs of the Church, whose more than 10 million members are spread over some 160 nations and territories. His Church assignments have taken him around the world many times, and he has dedicated more temples than any other leader in the history of the Church. He is the first Church President ever to travel to Spain, where in 1996 he broke ground for a temple in Madrid, and to Africa, where he met with thousands of Latter-day Saints in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, and South Africa. President Hinckley was born June 23, 1910, in Salt Lake City, Utah, a son of Bryant Strigham and Ada Bitner Hinckley. His first job was as a newspaper carrier for the Deseret News, a Salt Lake City daily. After attending public schools in Salt Lake City, the future Church leader earned a bachelor of arts degree at the University of Utah and then accepted a call from the Church to spend two years as a full-time missionary in Great Britain. He served with distinction and ultimately was called to be an assistant to the Church Apostle who presided over all the European missions. Upon being released from missionary service in the mid-1930s, he was called by then Church President Heber J. Grant to organize what has become the Church's public affairs program. President Hinckley's major assignments during two decades of service as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles included the supervision of Church units in Asia, Europe, and South America. His Church committee assignments as a general officer have been in such areas as temples, missionary work, welfare services, priesthood, and members in the military service. He also served as chairman of the executive committee for the observance of the Church's 150th anniversary in 1980. In addition to his Church duties, President Hinckley has been active in community and business affairs, serving as chairman and board member of a number of business corporations. In 2004, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civil award, by President George W. Bush. He has been the recipient of a number of educational honors including: the Distinguished Citizen Award, from Southern Utah University; Distinguished Alumni Award, from the University of Utah; and honorary doctorates from Westminster College, Utah State University, University of Utah, Brigham Young University, and Southern Utah University. He has received the Silver Buffalo Award of the Boy Scouts of America and has been honored by the National Conference (formerly the National Conference of Christians and Jews) for his contributions to tolerance and understanding in the world. He has served as chairman of the executive committees of the Board of Trustees of Brigham Young University and of the Church Board of Education. The Church Educational System includes not only Brigham Young University's Utah and Hawaii campuses, but Brigham Young University - Idaho in Rexburg, Idaho, LDS Business College in Salt Lake City, elementary and secondary schools in developing countries, and hundreds of seminaries and institutes of religion serving several hundred thousand high school- and college-age youth. President Hinckley married Marjorie Pay in the Salt Lake Temple in 1937. They have five children. Sister Hinckley passed away 6 April 2004. President Hinckley followed her on January 27, 2008, at the age of 97.

Holbrook, Lafayette Hinckley

Holbrook, Lafayette Hinckley
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Lafayette & Alsina E Holbrook

Board of Trustees, 1901 to 1938. Layfayette Hinckley Holbrook was born in July 15, 1877 in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah. He married Alsina Elizabeth Brimhall (daughter of George H. Brimhall, president of Brigham Young University, and Alsina Elizabeth Wilkins Brimhall) on May 15, 1901, in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had eleven children, all of whom attended BYU Elementary Training School, B. Y. Jr. High and Brigham Young High School, in Provo, Utah. He died on August 6, 1969 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. His parents: Lafayette Holbook and Emily Angelina Hinckley Holbrook. ~ ~ ~ ~ The eleven children of Lafayette Hinckley Holbrook and Alsina Brimhall Holbrook: 1. Raymond Brimhall Holbrook, born March 16, 1902 in Raymond, Alberta, Canada. He married Esther Ruth Hamilton on August 24, 1928. He died in Salt Lake City, Utah on May 24, 1989. 2. Rachel Holbrook, born December 6, 1903 in Raymond, Alberta, Canada. She married Robert Clair Anderson on May 25, 1927. She died June 17, 1946 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Manti, Utah. 3. George Blaine Holbrook, born April 8, 1906 in Provo, Utah and died August 2, 1924, at the age of 18. He did not marry. 4. Jennie Holbrook, b. March 3, 1908 in Provo, Utah. She married Delbert Valentine Groberg on June 11, 1930. She died March 25, 2004 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. 5. Mary Holbrook, b. March 2, 1910 in Provo, Utah. She married Benjamin Alva Maxwell on May 27, 1932. She died on June 19, 1977 in Salt Lake City, Utah. 6. Ruth Holbrook, born January 8, 1912 in Provo, Utah. She married Francis Ray Brown on May 27, 1932. She died December 16, 1983 in Pasadena, California. Interment, Provo, Utah. 7. Elizabeth Holbrook, born February 9, 1914 in Provo, Utah. She married Alonzo Kay Berry on September 19, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She died on June 29, 2000 in Provo Utah. Interment, Whittier, California. 8. Jean Holbrook, born October 7, 1915 in Provo, Utah. She died August 26, 1923 at the age of almost 8. Interment, Provo, Utah. 9. Helen Holbrook, born in about 1917. She married Carlyle Dahlquist. She resides in Provo, Utah. 10. Vera Holbrook, born October 29, 1918 in Provo, Utah. She married Maurice King Heninger on June 5, 1941, in Salt Lake City, Utah. She died February 16, 2005 in Provo, Utah. 11. Alsina Elaine (Elaine) Holbrook, born Provo, Utah in about 1921. Elaine married John Arnold Haymore. She lives in Salt Lake City. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lafayette Hinckley Holbrook (1877–1969) and Alsina Elisabeth Brimhall Holbrook (1876–1960) first met when both attended the Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah. They corresponded during Lafayette’s LDS mission to New Zealand (1897–1900) and they married on 15 May 1901. They had eleven (11) children and lived in Raymond, Alberta, Canada; Provo, Utah; and Salt Lake City, Utah.

Holt, Edward H.

Holt, Edward H.
Provo, Utah US

Edward Holt

BY Academy Collegiate Normal Class of 1895, and Collegiate Class of 1897. Faculty, and Board of Trustees. E. H. Holt. Received degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) on May 23, 1895. Source 1: Salt Lake Tribune, May 24, 1895. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: Class of 1895. Edward H. Holt appears in a photograph held by the BYU Archives purporting to be "the graduating Class of 1895" (UAP 2 Folder 038) - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 3: Collegiate Class of 1895: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 24. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Edward H. Holt. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff, Board of Trustees. Edward H. Holt, Business Education teacher at BYA, BYH & BYU, 1893-1938. Holt appeared in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Benjamin Cluff in 1892. Holt served on the Board of Trustees 1915 to 1938. Edward H. Holt, secretary to the BYU faculty, served as acting president of BYU in 1929, while President Franklin Harris was still in Russia.

Hunter, Howard W.

Hunter, Howard W.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Howard W. Hunter

Board of Trustees, 1959 to 1975. Howard W. Hunter, fourteenth president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was the first president born in the twentieth Century. With a term in office of only nine months, his was the shortest tenure of any of the modern prophets. Still, despite ill health, it was a busy tenure with extensive traveling and speaking. He emphasized the importance of every member being temple worthy, holding a recommend, and attending the temple regularly. Howard W. Hunter was born November 14, 1907 in Boise, Idaho to John William Hunter and Nellie Rasmussen. While his mother was an active member and his father descended from stalwart pioneers, his paternal great- grandfather had fallen away and Howard's father was not a member of the Church. In fact, when Howard turned eight and desired to be baptized, his father forbade it, wishing him to be older before making the decision. It was only after Howard reached the age of twelve and could not receive the priesthood that his father acceded to the importunings and allowed the young lad to join the Church. Howard suffered many ills during his life and it is a monument to his faith that he could achieve so much. At the age of four, Howard contracted polio, then a ravaging killer of the young. Although Howard escaped the paralysis that afficted so many polio victims, he suffered back pain the rest of his life. He was also color blind. In later years, he suffered from prostate cancer which spread to the bones. Notwithstanding his ills, Howard developed a strong work ethic and worked hard even as a child. His early employment included picking fruit at local orchards, cleaning corn, caddying, soda jerk, copy writer for a newspaper, and bellboy and porter at a local hotel. Still, at the age of fifteen, he found time to earn the Eagle Scout Award, the highest in Scouting, becoming the second Scout in Boise to do so. Howard developed an interest in music at an early age and took piano and violin lessons as a child. Later he learned to play the marimba, drums, saxophone, clarinet and then trumpet. Although he had thought to enter the University of Washington in Seattle, he decided instead to accept an opportunity for the band he had formed in high school to perform aboard a cruise ship during a two month tour of the orient. It was an adventurous trip. In Shanghai, he witnesssed a city on the edge of revolution. During a Chinese New Year celebration in Hong Kong, a British Bobby had to rescue him and a companion from pursuers. In the Philippines the band had the chance to play on a local radio station. Most memorable, perhaps, he found on his return home, that his father had joined the Church during his absence. In 1928, he moved to Los Angeles where after a sucession of dead-end jobs including sorting lemons by color-quite dificult for one who is color blind, he secured employment at a bank and began to attend night school. While attending a Church social, he met Clara Jeffers. A courtship ensued and on June 10, 1931 Howard and Clara were married in the Salt Lake Temple. They would later have three children, one of whom died in early childhood. Soon after their marriage, the bank at which Howard was working went belly-up, and the Great Depresssion, which had seemed far away, was suddenly at their doorsteps. The couple was reduced for a time to living with Claire's parents and Howard working for her father painting bridges before he secured stable employment with the Los Angeles Flood Control District. His new job involved legal affairs and Howard developed an interest in the law. He returned to school where he earned a law degree in 1939, graduating cum laude from Southwestern University. He was admitted to the bar later the same year. In 1940, he established his own private practice as an attorney. A year later, he was called as Bishop of his ward. Those who recall his days as Bishop remember him as a compassionate yet determined leader. One day during Sacarament Meeting, he observed that the Deacons, having served the Sacrament, slipped out of the meeting. Bishop Hunter left the stand, followed them next door to a drugstore where they were enjoying sodas, and collaring them completely, said, "Brethren, when you have finished your malts, we will continue the meeting." He served as Bishop for eight years. Two years after being released as Bishop, the Hunters moved to nearby Arcadia where soon afterward he was called as the Stake President. During the nine and a half years he served as Stake President, he led numerous building funds projects including those for a new stake center and, starting in 1951, the Los Angeles Temple. During his tenure as stake president, he also served as chairman of the southern California regional council of stake presidents, encouraged family home evening for stake members fifteen years before its formal designation as a Church program, and pioneered the early-morning seminary program in southern California. Howard was also active in doing temple work. On the occasion of his forty-sixth birthday he was in the chapel of the Los Angeles temple instructing members of his stake who were in attendance of a stake temple day. He received the suprise of his life and the best birthday present ever when his parents walked in, dressed in white, prepared to be sealed to one another and have him sealed to them. Howard's law practice flourished and he was, in fact, nominated to a state judgeship. He declined the honor since he feared it would curtail his freedom to set his own schedule and thus adversely impact his time with family and church. Howard might have looked forward to a more leisurely time with approaching retirement but the Lord would have none of it. In 1959, during a routine visit to Salt Lake City to attend conference he was called in for an interview with President David O. Mckay. President Mckay went straight to the point. "The Lord has spoken. You are called to be one of his special witnesses, and tomorrow you will be sustained as a member of the Council of the Twelve." Howard could hardly speak when he called Claire who was in Provo with a new grandson. President David O. McKay ordained him an Apostle and set him apart as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve on 15 October 1959. Elder Hunter became the seventy-fourth Apostle to be called in this dispensation. The new Apostle was called upon to travel the world in fulfillment of his responsibilities. He liked to plan his own itinerary and would study the history and culture of the regions to which he was assigned. Tonga, Norway, and Panama were all beneficiaries of his visits and loving counsel. He traveled so often that one of his young grandsons called him the "Grandpa who lives at the airport." He served as President of the Genealogical Society of Utah from 1964 to 1972. His innovations there included computerizing the records for the first tiime. In 1970 he was named Church Historian. The early seventies saw declining health of both Elder Hunter and his beloved Claire. She suffered two cerebral hemmorhages whic necesitated full time nursing care. Elder Hunter visited her every day, even as he was preparing for back surgery himself. Claire died in October 1983. In coming years he suffered a heart attack, coronary bypass surgery, and continuing lower back pain. An operation for a bleeding ulcer required nine units of blood, over a gallon! The operation left him in kidney failure. An additional operation relieved his back pain but left him with a constant severe pain in the legs. At April 1989 general conference, President Hunter displayed typical composure and resilience while speaking on barely mobile legs with the help of a walker. Losing his balance, he fell backwards into a flower arrangement but was immediately helped up and continued his talk. Tests later showed he had broken three ribs in the fall. In 1989 with the death of Marion G. Romney, Elder Hunter was named President of the Quorum of the Twelve. Then a year later he announced at the weekly meeting of the Twelve, "I’m going to be married this afternoon. Inis Stanton is an old acquaintance from California. I’ve been visiting with her for some time, and I’ve decided to be married." But his health problems were not over. He suffered internal bleeding, and later gall bladder surgery. He initially failed to respond after surgery but awakened some days later fully coherant and fully recovered. On May 30, 1994 with the death of President Ezra Taft Benson, Howard W. Hunter was sustained by the Twelve and set apart as President, Prophet, Seer, and Revelator of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. On the following Monday, President Hunter spoke to the press: "I have shed many tears and have sought my Father in Heaven in earnest prayer with a desire to be equal to the high and holy calling which is now mine." The two emphases of his administration were the need to become more Christlike and to become a temple-worthy, temple-attending people. Only nine months later on March 3, 1995, President Howard W. Hunter's earthly ministry came to an end. He was suceeded by President Gordon B. Hinckley.

Isaacson, Thorpe B.

Isaacson, Thorpe B.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Thorpe Isaacson

Board of Trustees, 1966 to 1970. Henry Thorpe Beal Isaacson, born 1898, died 1970. Thorpe Isaacson was born 1898 in Ephraim, Utah. He was baptized into the LDS Church as a child. He married Lula Maughn Jones in 1920, and they had two children. Offices: Second Counselor to Presiding Bishop 1946-1952; First Counselor to Presiding Bishp 1952-1961; Assistant to the Twelve 1961-1965, 1970; and Counselor to President David O. McKay 1965-1970. He died in 1970 in Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Henry Thorpe Beal Isaacson was born September 6, 1898 in Ephraim, Utah, the son of Martin Isaacson and his wife, Mary Jemima Beal. He was married to Lula Maughan Jones on the sixteenth of March 1920 and the marriage was blessed with the birth of two children. Thorpe B. Isaacson was a businessman. On December 12, 1946, Elder Isaacson was called to be Second Counselor to Presiding Bishop LeGrand Richards. He was subsequently called on April 6, 1952 to be First Counselor to Presiding Bishop Joseph L. Wirthlin. Elder Isaacson was called as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve on Sept. 30, 1961, in which position he served until on October 28, 1965 he was called as a Counselor to President David O. McKay. Both he and Joseph Fielding Smith were called to these unnumbered positions making the First Presidency consist of five men at the time. This was occasioned by the unprecedented growth of the Church at a time when the President and his First and Second Counselors were slowed by the effects of age. President Isaacson was released at the death of President McKay on Jan. 18, 1970. He then resumed his position as an Assistant to the Twelve from Jan. 23, 1970 until his death at Salt Lake City, Utah, on Nov. 9, 1970.

John, David (1833-1908)

John, David (1833-1908)
Provo, Utah US

David John

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1891 to 1908. David John was born in Little Newcastle, Pembrokshire, Wales on January 29, 1833 and was baptized into the LDS Church at age fifteen. Until his death in 1908, he was active in many endeavors: He served as a missionary to Wales; as first counselor in the Utah Stake presidency for 23 years; as president of the Utah Stake for 7 years; and as stake superintendant of Sunday Schools for 28 years; as well as being vice president of the BYU Board of Trustees for over 16 years. His parents were Daniel John and Mary Williams John. He first married Mary Wride on February 8, 1860 in Provo, Utah. He second married Jane Cree on October 8, 1865 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on December 24, 1908 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. ~~~~ BYU Special Collections and Manuscripts Department, Harold B. Lee Library: David John A long-time chronicler of local and territorial history in his voluminous diary, Utah County resident David John relates his feelings on the important events of late 1895 and early 1896. His five volumes span over half a century. (Ms 21) ~ ~ ~ ~ Dedication of Academy Building; January 4, 1892, was a high point in the history of Brigham Young Academy; for on that day Dr. Karl G. Maeser was released as principal, Professor Benjamin Cluff, Jr., was installed as new principal, and the new Academy Building was dedicated in impressive services. (After construction of the College Building in 1898 the name of the Academy Building was changed to High School Building, and in 1922 President Franklin S. Harris changed it again to Education Building, its present name.) On dedication day just before noon, all of the students met in the assembly room of the warehouse, where Dr. Maeser spoke to them on the blessings they had enjoyed in that old home, and lifted his voice in benediction. The meeting was held in Room D. Among the visiting guests were Governor A. L. Thomas, Presidents Wilford Woodruff, George Q. Cannon, and Joseph Smith. Local authorities included President A. O. Smoot, David John, Harvey H. Cluff, Judge J. D. Jones, Karl G. Maeser, Bishop Myron Tanner, and others. ~ ~ ~ ~

Kimball, Spencer W.

Kimball, Spencer W.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Spencer and Camilla Kimball

Board of Trustees, 1951 to 1985. Spencer Woolley Kimball, president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1973 to 1985, was born in Salt Lake City on 28 March 1895 to Andrew Kimball and Olive Woolley. His grandfathers were Heber C. Kimball and Edwin D. Woolley. When Andrew Kimball was designated president of the St. Joseph Stake in 1898, the Kimballs moved to Thatcher, Arizona. After a mission to the central states and marrying Camilla Eyring, Spencer worked in banking, and later insurance and real estate. He served as clerk, and then counselor in the St. Joseph Stake presidency, and was president of the new Mount Graham Stake from 1938 until his call as an apostle in 1943. He was assigned in 1945 to work with American Indians, and he devoted great effort to improving opportunities for Native Americans through a program whereby thousands of Indian children lived with Mormon families during the school year. In December 1973 Kimball succeeded Harold B. Lee as president of the LDS Church. Though he was seventy-eight, he set a brisk pace. Despite his having suffered heart attacks in the 1940s, his energy was legendary and he exemplified his slogans, "Lengthen our stride" and "Do it." Throat cancer in the 1950s left him with a distinctive soft hoarse voice. He encouraged missionary service by worthy young men and called for volunteers among women and couples. He extended the church to communist countries by avoiding political stances. Under his leadership temples increased from sixteen to three times that many. In June 1978 he announced a revelation that all worthy men and women could receive temple ordinances regardless of race or ancestry, thus ending long-standing restrictions on members of Negroid ancestry. The church under Kimball opposed the Equal Rights Amendment as a misguided means to reach legitimate objectives, and criticized the weapons buildup by world powers, successfully opposing basing MX missiles in the Utah-Nevada desert. Kimball directed the recreation of the First Quorum of Seventy, establishment of emeritus status for general authorities, consolidation of church meetings into a three-hour block, the publishing of new editions of scriptures, and the creation of a museum and genealogy library. This man short in stature had great energy, fierce loyalty, fearlessness in innovation, unusual warmth, a lively sense of humor, and unshakable faith. His wife, Camilla, also served many as role model. Highly intelligent and independent, she nonetheless wholeheartedly supported him. Brain surgery in 1979 slowed him, and recurring troubles in 1981 ended his active leadership. During his last four years, his counselor Gordon B. Hinckley shouldered major responsibilities. President Kimball died 5 November 1985.

Knight, J.  William [Jesse William]

Knight, J. William [Jesse William]
Provo, Utah US

William & Annie+Lucy Knight

Class of 1894. Board of Trustees, 1921 to 1939. J. William Knight. J. Will was in school in Payson, Utah, until sixteen years of age, when his father, Jesse Knight, moved his family to Provo to receive the benefits of the Brigham Young Academy. Karl G. Maeser and George H. Brimhall frequently visited the Knight home in Payson, and "sold" education and the Academy to the growing family. In Provo, J. Will took several classes under Dr. Maeser, Benjamin Cluff and George H. Brimhall, but his major professor was Joseph B. Keeler in the Commercial Department. J. Will Knight graduated from the BYA high school program in 1894, having enjoyed the use of the new Education Building and its budding library. Source: Book, The Sons of Brigham, by T. Earl Pardoe, pp. 124-127. ~ ~ ~ ~ Board of Trustees, 1921 to 1939. Jesse William Knight [J. Will], the second son of Jesse and Amanda McEwan Knight, was born at Payson, Utah, August 20, 1874. His early life on the ranch made him acquainted with horses and farm life. He was trained along commercial lines at school. He filled a mission in England for the Church, traveled on the continent and returned home ready to take his share of the family responsibilities. He helped his father discover the mines and work them. He accompanied his brother Raymond, to Alberta to survey this country. Their impressions were so favorable that their father made large purchases of land which the boys returned to stock and manage. After Raymond was established he came here and built a home, taking an active part in building the community. J. William Knight was a spiritually-minded man and when the Church was organized in Raymond, he was chosen as the first bishop. A year or so later when the Stake was organized in 1903, President H. S. Allen chose him to be his counselor in the presidency. One 'old timer' said of Bishop Knight, "He was a fine man and everybody loved him. He couldn't be beat as a bishop. He was dignified and understanding in his calling, yet he was a good sport and wanted to be right in the middle of athletics of every kind. He could laugh as hard and have just as much fun as the next fellow." In 1907 the heavy responsibilites of his father's interests took him back to Utah where he became vice president of most of the Knight Investment Companies. In 1951, Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Knight returned to Raymond, Alberta, Canada, to renew their acquaintances and join in the Golden Jubilee of the town his illustrious father founded. ~ ~ ~ ~ Jesse William Knight was born on August 20, 1874, in Payson, Utah. His parents were Jesse Knight and Amanda Melvina McEwean. He married Annie Melinda Skousen on _______, and Lucy Jane Brimhall on January 18, 1899. Jesse William Knight died on March 11, 1956.

Knight, Jesse

Knight, Jesse
Provo, Utah US

Jesse and Amanda Knight

Board of Trustees, 1901 to 1921. Honorary Alumnus of BYA/BYH. Jesse Knight was one of relatively few Mormon mining magnates in the West. Poor throughout his youth, he was handsomely rewarded for his diligence as a prospector with the discovery of the famous Humbug mine in the Tintic Mining District near Eureka, Utah, in 1886. As the Humbug proved profitable, he acquired other mines in the vicinity, including the Uncle Sam, Beck Tunnel, Iron Blossom, and Colorado. Knight is significant in western mining and entrepreneurial history because in several important ways he differed from the typical "robber baron" capitalists of the late-nineteenth-century Gilded Age. His success, like theirs, depended upon the skillful acquisition and management of such business variables as claims, labor, capital, technology, and government services, and also upon the development of cost-efficient integrated enterprises, such as the Knight Investment Company. However, he also owned more patented mining claims in the Intermountain West than did his Gentile counterparts, and he was not inclined to engage in stock manipulation like many other mining entrepreneurs and railroad barons. Moreover, his business methods, especially when dealing with his working men, were far more paternalistic and benevolent than those of the typical big businessmen of the era. While other company town and mine owners often exploited their workers, Knight treated his workers very fairly in his company town of Knightville, Utah, which he equipped with a meetinghouse, amusement hall, and school instead of the usual hedonistic establishments of mining camp life. Although his philanthropy was not unique for the period, his generous gifts to Brigham Young University (an interest he shared with his wife, Amanda) earned him the reputation as the "patron saint" of BYU. He also gave freely to the Mormon Church and to many church-related projects, thereby revealing a kindly, religiously motivated disposition. Furthermore, his comfortable but unostentatious home in Provo, Utah, did not rival the extravagantly garish mansions built by big businessmen from San Francisco's Nob Hill to New York's Fifth Avenue. Nor did he seek high political office like mining kings George Hearst, James Fair, William Sharon, John P. Jones, Nathaniel Hill, Jerome Chaffee, Horace Tabor, William Clark, or Utah's Thomas Kearns--all of whom served in the "millionaire's club" of the United States Senate. Essentially more sensitive and modest than most business leaders during this age of ruthless capitalism and conspicuous consumption, he probably deserved the endearing nickname of "Uncle Jesse"--a rich but giving uncle. In fact, he believed that his money was for the purpose of doing good and building up his church; he regarded the matter as a "trusted stewardship." As he once said, "The earth is the Lord's bank, and no man has a right to take money out of that bank and use it extravagantly upon himself." Few nabobs of the era would have been willing to make that statement. Although he strayed from the Mormon Church in his early years and briefly affiliated with the anti-Mormon Liberal party in Utah, one must assume that his otherwise devout faith helped prevent him from falling prey to the capitalistic corruption and self-indulgent excesses so tempting and common to the business leaders of the Gilded Age and the western mining industry. Jesse Knight might not have been the only Mormon mining magnate in Utah, but he left a mark on his church and upon the educational and industrial development of the state. In 1960 BYU honored Knight's memory by naming the business building (now the humanities building) after him. Yet few students today are aware that the building's namesake possessed what former BYU administrator Herald R. Clark called a "magnificent obsession with helpfulness" (Gary Fuller Reese,"Uncle Jesse": The Story of Jesse Knight, Miner, Industrialist, Philanthropist[Provo: BYU master's thesis, 1961], p. 65). In addition to his support for BYU, Knight also provided generous and much-needed financial support for the LDS Church. Knight's early life had been punctuated by poverty. He was born in Nauvoo on September 6, 1845, the sixth child of Newell and Lydia Knight. The Knights joined the western exodus in late 1846, but Newell made it only as far as Nebraska, where he died in January 1847. Lydia, pregnant with their seventh child, joined other pioneers at Winter Quarters. The family reached the Salt Lake Valley in 1850. As a child, Knight gathered pigweed and sego lily roots to augment the family food supply. By age 11 he was hauling firewood with a team of oxen. Over the next dozen years, Knight held a range of jobs: teamster, logger, scout and guide, railroad worker, member of a cavalry, rancher, cattle buyer, trader, and miner. At some point during those years he lost interest in the LDS Church, although he married Amanda McEwan, an active Latter-day Saint, in 1869. Then in 1887 an experience forever changed his commitment to the Church. A rat fell in the family well, died, and decomposed. Jennie, his youngest daughter, was the first to become ill from drinking the contaminated water. Despite his professed lack of faith, Knight was finally persuaded to bring in elders to give her a blessing, and Jennie recovered, something he always considered miraculous. His oldest daughter Minnie, however, died of the infection, and he remembered that 17 years earlier she had nearly died of diphtheria. At that time Knight had promised that he would not forget God if the Lord would spare Minnie's life. As he described it, "I had not kept that promise. . . . I prayed for forgiveness and help. My prayer was answered and I received a testimony" (J. William Knight, The Jesse Knight Family[Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1940], pp. 35–36). The family then lived in Payson, Utah, about 25 miles from the Tintic mining district. While visiting the district one day, Knight sat under a tree on Godiva Mountain and heard a voice that told him, "This country is here for the Mormons." He always remembered the voice and interpreted it to mean that the wealth of the land was meant to assist the Latter-day Saints. Not long afterward, Knight staked his first mining claim, which he sold in 1890 for $14,000. This provided funds to move his family to Provo. According to Diane L. Mangum, whose story about Jesse Knight appeared in the October 1993 Ensign, "Always generous, Jesse became even more open-handed with his newfound prosperity. He offered help to everyone who asked, and often cosigned on loans for them. More often than not, Jesse was left to repay the debts. His money and credit slipped away, and he even had to mortgage the home he had built in Provo." Knight had a natural instinct about land. He returned to Godiva Mountain, located some promising limestone outcrops, and decided to stake a mining claim there. He then visited his brother-in-law Jared Roundy and offered him a share in the stake. But Roundy declined, calling the claim a "damned old humbug." Knight secured a loan and dubbed the mine "Humbug." It turned out to be one of the richest lead-silver deposits ever found in the West. It wasn't long before his wealth was used to aid BYU. Although not well educated himself, Knight had sent several of his children to Brigham Young Academy and had observed firsthand the school's financial struggles. In 1901 Knight accepted an invitation to join the board of Brigham Young Academy, and he later became a member of the executive committee. For the next 20 years, he donated land, bonds, irrigation shares, and money to assist the university. The Knight family funded half of the $130,000 needed to build the Karl G. Maeser Building, and when more money was needed Knight bought back, for $20,000, the Blue Bench Irrigation bonds he had donated to the school. In later years, the Jesse Knight Endowment funded the construction of Amanda Knight Hall and Allen Hall. The Knight-Mangum Building was named for Knight's daughter and daughter-in-law, who followed his example of generosity to BYU.

Knowlton, Martha Jane

Knowlton, Martha Jane
Provo, Utah US

Martha Jane & Howard Coray

Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1875 to 1882. Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. In the 1870s when Brigham Young envisioned a school combining sacred and secular learning, he selected several educated Saints to lay its foundations. Among those asked to contribute was Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. Martha Jane was born in Kentucky in 1821 to Sidney Algernon and Harriet Burnham Knowlton. The family later moved to Illinois, where in 1840 they heard George A. Smith preach the gospel. Martha led the family in baptism. Her great admiration for the Prophet was later described by her husband, Howard Coray, who wrote, "I have frequently heard her say, that [the Prophet] was the greatest miracle to her she had ever seen; and that she valued her acquaintance with him above everything else." Howard also recorded his first impression of Martha: "I discovered at once that she was ready, off hand, and inclined to be witty; also, that her mind took a wider range than was common for young ladies of her age." The two were married on Feb. 6, 1841. After Howard worked as a clerk for the Prophet, the couple began to teach school in Nauvoo. In January 1846 they received their endowments in the Nauvoo Temple, leaving the city with the Saints that same year. To earn money for the trip to Utah, the couple worked for several years in Iowa, where Howard farmed and Martha tended a ferry. They entered the Salt Lake Valley in 1850. Their daughter, Martha Lewis, recalls her mother's sharp wit during the journey in the following memoir: The gold rush to California was on and many curious people came by asking dozens of annoying questions. One time a man came up to mother with curiosity written on his face, but before he could say anything, she started out rapidly with "I'm David Crockett's aunt. I came from the East and I'm going to the West. I think that man over there died with the small pox." This seemed to suffice his curiosity, for he walked away and without a word. I suppose he wondered what was the matter with mother. Once in Utah, Howard worked as a tithing clerk in Salt Lake City before they moved to Provo in 1857. When her husband homesteaded a ranch in Mona, Juab County, in 1871, Martha continued to reside in Provo in order to fulfill her commitments to the community. She participated in Church activities, including Sunday School and Relief Society functions, and wrote for the Woman's Exponent. She distilled herbs and liniments, marketing her products from Nephi to Ogden. Although most of her products had medicinal value, Martha also produced "Lightning Cage Oil," reputed to be stronger than Hartshorn. A slight whiff would render any assailant helpless, gasping for breath. She held the power of attorney for several court matters, and her journal entries and letters demonstrate her knowledge of the law. Martha's journal also records the commitment she had to the education and personal improvement of her 12 children. She wrote of their progress: "All are studying very hard at arithmetic, every leisure hour. Donny read 6 pages and finished his book. Will and Sid began to study; got 5 parts of speech." And she continued to improve her own mind, writing, "Nellie and George came from the city and brought my books, Walter Scott and Herodotus." As a teacher, Martha often faced the frustrations created by a lack of stability, tuition collection, and a general indifference of the public to education. Financial difficulties also plagued her as she served on the Board of Trustees at Brigham Young Academy. In an editorial published by George Q. Cannon, she complained about the lack of support given to the academy, stating that the school was struggling to accomplish the "greatest good with the smallest means" and that its success was due mainly to an "unflinching trust in God." She finished with a call to "Israel" to pay more attention to how close principles of "faith, honor and a deep desire for general intelligence cling to the scholar even after leaving Brigham Young Academy." Despite these trials, Martha continued to champion educational causes throughout her life. In a letter to Brigham Young, she asked, "Does not the deed require the sacred book mentioned to be taken up as a study in the same way as the sciences mentioned?" She further wrote, "My principle of education has been -- God's laws of religion first -- Man's laws of honor and morality second -- Science of every attainable kind and as much as possible but lastly in forming a permanent base for character and hope of future salvation." The Woman's Exponent eulogized Martha with these words: Very early in life she evinced a character in a degree somewhat rare for one of her sex--that is, of decidedly doing her own thinking; hence, before adopting any principle of religion, law, or politics, whether proposed by father, husband, priest, or king, she must clearly see and understand for herself the righteousness and consistency of the matter. ~~~~ This article is part of an honors thesis written by Amy Reynolds, who graduated from BYU in December 1997. ~~~~ Daughter Mary Coray Roberts was born in 1848 at Winter Quarters, Nebraska, the daughter of Howard and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray. Her family migrated to Utah with the Mormon pioneers in 1850. Her family moved from Salt Lake City to Provo, Utah, ca. 1857. Her mother, Martha Jane Knowleton Coray served on the board of Brigham Young Academy. Orville Clark Roberts was born in 1833, son of Dr. Daniel and Eliza Aldula Clark of Keokuk, Iowa. In 1850, he migrated to Utah with the Mormon pioneers. Mary Coray and Clark Roberts were married in 1868 at Provo, Utah. They had nine children. The family made their first home at Mona, Juab County, Utah, moved to Moncos, Colorado, ca. 1881, and to Jackson, New Mexico, in 1891. After their children were married, Mary and Clark went to live near at daughter at San Diego, California. Clark died there in 1912. Mary returned to Utah to live with a daughter and died at Vernal, Utah, in 1923.

Lee, Harold B. (Trustee)

Lee, Harold B. (Trustee)
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Harold & Fern+Freda Lee

Board of Trustees, 1950 to 1973. Harold Bingham Lee (1899-1973) became the eleventh President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on July 7, 1972, and served until his death on December 26, 1973. His 538-day tenure was the shortest service by a Church President in history up to that date, despite the fact that at age seventy-three President Lee was the youngest person to hold the office initially in nearly forty years. One of his greatest contributions to the Church, the organization of the correlation program, was made when he was still a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. President Lee was born on March 28, 1899, in Clifton, Idaho, to Samuel Marion Lee and Louisa Emiline Bingham. He grew up in impoverished, rural conditions, and from childhood he advanced faster than his peers. He started school a year earlier than was the practice in his farming community because he could already write his name and knew the alphabet. As a young boy, he was large for his age, and when his friends were ordained to the priesthood, he became a deacon also, although he was technically not quite old enough for the honor. In keeping with this pattern, he began his career in education at a young age. He earned a teaching certificate at Albion State Normal School in Idaho, and at seventeen was appointed to be principal of the one-room Silver Star School at Weston, Idaho, teaching twenty to twenty-five pupils, ranging from first to eighth grade. One year later, he was appointed principal of the larger grade school at Oxford, Idaho, where he served for three winters. These responsibilities prepared him for his call in 1920 to the Western States Mission, headquartered in Denver, Colorado. After nine months he became conference president, presiding over both missionaries and local Church members in Denver. During his two year missionary service, he baptized forty-five converts to the Church. President Lee was one of the youngest stake presidents in the Church when at thirty-one, he was set apart as president of Pioneer Stake in Salt Lake City. Within a few years, he was faced with the suffering among stake members brought on by the Great Depression. With his counselors, he struggled to save his people from hunger and financial ruin. His ingenuity in helping them obtain basic necessities led to his appointment by the First Presidency in 1935 to organize a Welfare program for the entire Church. In 1932 President Lee was appointed to fill a vacancy in the Salt Lake City Commission and was assigned to direct the Department of Streets and Public Improvements. A year later, he was elected to the same position. For years Utah citizens urged him to run for the governorship or for the U.S. Senate. Elder Lee was called as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on April 6, 1941. As he looked around the council room in the Salt Lake Temple where the quorum held its meetings, Elder Lee, then forty-two, discovered that every man there was at least twenty years his senior. He thought of himself as a seedling among giant redwoods, causing his tutor and friend J. Reuben Clark, Jr., a counselor in the First Presidency, to refer affectionately to him as the "Kid." Early in his apostleship, Elder Lee served on a committee to simplify Church organization and functions. For two decades, he studied the subject and prepared proposals. Finally when the time for implementing them came in the 1960s, the correlation program was introduced, with Lee serving as chairman of the Correlation Committee. Correlation emphasized the family and the home, the connection of auxiliary organizations with the priesthood, simplification of the curriculum, the teaching of the scriptures, and restructuring the Church magazines to serve children, youth, and adults better. In January 1970, Elder Lee was called to serve as a counselor in the First Presidency while concurrently presiding over the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He was called to be president of the church after President Joseph Fielding Smith died on July 2, 1972. Following a long period when age and illness had prevented the previous Church Presidents from traveling, President Lee moved out among the people. He attended area conferences in England, Mexico, and Germany. President Lee also conscientiously and purposefully devoted much time to address youth conferences, to restore the prophetic image to the young members of the Church. He was the first to visit Israel and Palestine as President of the Church. President Lee possessed a remarkable candidness about himself and the office of President. He talked openly of his feelings about his calling, allowing people to look into his heart. Sensitive spirituality was his greatest leadership quality. At age seventy-four he served as though in the prime of life, with a rich, full voice and characteristic vigor. His sudden death on December 26, 1973, from cardiac and lung failure stunned the Church. President Lee found great pleasure, and also experienced sorrows, in his family. In 1923 he married Fern Lucinda Tanner, whom he first met in the Western States Mission. To them were born two daughters, Maurine and Helen. They had ten grandchildren. Fern died September 24, 1962, and Maurine died shortly thereafter, making this a difficult period in President Lee's life. He married Freda Johanna (Joan) Jensen [BYH Class of 1916], an educator, on June 17, 1963. Freda Joan Jensen Lee died on July 1, 1981 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Lyman, Richard Roswell

Lyman, Richard Roswell
Provo, Utah US

Richard and Amy Lyman

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. Richard R. Lyman received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Normal Class of 1891. Richard Roswell Lyman. He served as President of the High School Normal Senior Class of 1891. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Richard R. Lyman, BYA Mathematics and Physics teacher, 1895-1896. Richard Roswell Lyman was a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles. He was born Nov. 23, 1870, at Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, the son of Francis M. Lyman and Clara Caroline Callister. His father was president of the Council of the Twelve for thirteen years and a member of that Council thirty-six years. Amasa M. Lyman, the grandfather of Richard R. Lyman, was a member of the Council of the Twelve for twenty-eight years. On his mother's side, Richard R. Lyman belonged to the fifth generation of members of the Church. His great grandfather, John Smith, the Prophet's uncle, was one of the presiding Patriarchs of the Church. The mother of this Patriarch also belonged to the Church. Richard R. Lyman's grandmother, on his mother's side, was Caroline Smith Callister, the only sister of the late George A. Smith, who was a counselor to President Brigham Young. In April, 1878, at the age of seven years, he moved with his father's family to Tooele, Tooele County, Utah, where his father had been called to preside over the Tooele Stake of Zion. Richard R. Lyman was baptized July 29, 1879, and soon afterwards ordained a Deacon. At the age of eight (in the summer of 1879), Richard R. was placed in charge of his father's fine driving team and Concord buggy. While he was not big enough to hitch the team to the buggy, the team being unusually full of life, he took pride, under his father's direction and encouragement, in keeping the horses, harness, buggy and barn in clean and first class condition. In 1881-1882 he drove team for both his father and President Heber J. Grant, who had succeeded his father as president of the Tooele Stake. It always afforded the boy great joy to meet President Grant at the Tooele station or at Lake Point with his fine team, and he never forgot with what relish he ate candy and raisins with President Grant, as they rode together from the station or went about Tooele County on Stake business. In the fall of 1882, at the age of twelve, Richard R. was sent to Provo to attend school in the Brigham Young Academy. He was a student in that institution when the fire occurred which made it necessary to move the educational institution into another part of the city. Richard R. spent two summers working at the "Mill" located near E T City, on the shore of Great Salt Lake. Here he milked many cows, assisted in hauling logs for lumber, out of the mountains, etc. For two years Richard R. worked at the ranch of Hyrum E. Booth, near Grantsville, and he regarded the training given him and hard work he was required to do by Hyrum E. Booth and his industrious wife and family as one of the most valuable trainings that came into his life. An expert gardener from England pruned the trees, planted and cared for the garden and did the irrigating on the two homes belonging to Francis M. Lyman in Tooele. When this work was turned over later to Richard R. as a boy, he followed the example set for him by the English gardener. In August, 1888, with his sister Mary, he went to the Brigham Young Academy at Provo to study. At that time this educational institution was under the able leadership of Karl G. Maeser. Richard R. was ordained a Teacher by Bishop Thos. Atkin, Jr., Sept. 16, 1888. While attending school in Provo, Richard R. began a courtship with Miss Amy Brown, which covered continuously a period of eight years. To this girl, whom he married Sept. 9, 1896 (President Joseph F. Smith performing the ceremony), Richard R. always regarded himself as greatly indebted for whatever degree of success came to him in the business world, in the educational field or in Church work. After a summer of hard work at Grantsville, Richard R. and his sister Mary were sent by their father to the Brigham Young College at Logan, which institution then was under the direction of Dr. Joseph M. Tanner. During this school year (1889-1890), Richard R. began his labors as an assistant teacher in the college. While in Logan he took out special certificates in plane and solid geometry, algebra and physiology. The following year, in Provo, his studies covered trigonometry, analytic geometry, theory of teaching, psychology, logic, surveying, physics and rhetoric. During the summer of 1890, Richard R. was employed as a bookkeeper in the combined jewelry and furniture store of T. B. Cardon & Co. at Logan, and during the summer of 1891 he was bookkeeper for the Utah Manufacturing & Building Co. at Mill Creek, near Salt Lake City. Thus far during his school life Richard R. had been required to furnish his own clothing, his own books and his own spending money, while his father had paid his tuition and board. When Richard R. now asked his father for an opportunity to go East to college, the father offered to lend him the necessary means for a period of four years, an offer which the son promptly accepted. Repaying this money and the interest on it at the rate of 10 per cent, required a period of seven years, the principal amounting to nearly $2500. Richard R. was ordained an Elder, Aug. 29, 1891, by Joseph F. Smith and after he went East to study. While he attended the University at Ann Arbor, primarily for the purpose of studying mathematics with the thought of teaching in the Brigham Young University at Provo, and while he registered in the department of civil engineering, he devoted a great deal of time to the study of literature, history and public speaking. During his sophomore year he was elected president of his class and was elected to the same position a second time during his senior year. Richard R. spent all his vacations in hard work; one was devoted to the study of chemistry at the University at Michigan, while two were devoted to traveling through the State selling school supplies for a business firm at Chicago, and one was spent as assistant mine and railroad surveyor in the Tintic mining district, Utah. The school year 1895-1896 was spent in the Brigham Young University as principal of the High School and head of the department of mathematics and physics. Beginning in the fall or 1896 and continuing until the spring of 1918, Richard R. Lyman, in the University of Utah, passed through all the grades of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor and full professor in charge of the department of civil engineering. He held a full professorship and was head of the department for eighteen years. With his family Professor Lyman spent the summer of 1902 doing advanced work in the University of Chicago; thence he went to Cornell University where he was given a residence credit of three years. While there, with the class of 1903, he was graduated with the degree of M. C. E. (Master of Civil Engineering). In the spring of 1904 he was elected by the faculty of Cornell University to membership in the society of The Sigma Xi, a scientific organization into which only those who have achieved marked success and have unusual ability in the line of scientific investigation and research are supposed to be received. With the class of 1905 he was graduated with the degree of Ph. D. (Doctor of Philosophy). In one year he was awarded the only scholarship offered by the college of civil engineering and during another the only fellowship offered by that same department. From 1909 to 1918 he served as vice-chairman of the Utah State Road Commission. During this nine years of service the work of the State Road Commission, from a beginning with little funds, so advanced that at the expiration of this time the State Road Commission was expending in the neighborhood of three-fourths to a million dollars annually. The Utah State Road Commission was created in 1909 and Richard R. Lyman was one of its original members and its first vice-chairman, which position he held during the whole nine years. He served as city engineer of Provo, was transitman on a railroad survey from Springville through Hobble Creek Canyon toward the Uintah reservation for Jesse Knight in 1898, and designed and superintended the construction of waterwork systems in nearly all the towns and smaller cities of Utah and many in Idaho and Wyoming. For years he conducted an office as a civil and consulting engineer. At various times he served as chief engineer and consulting engineer for the following companies: Melville Irrigation Company, Delta, Utah; Deseret Irrigation Company, Oasis, Utah; Oasis Land & Irrigation Company, with headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah; Delta Land & Water Company of Salt Lake City, Utah; Utah County Light & Power Company, American Fork, Utah, and Utah Copper Company of Salt Lake City. He was one of the original directors of the Intermountain Life Insurance Company and is at present serving as vice-president of this company. He was also president of the Giant Racer Company, vice-president of the Ensign Amusement Company, director of the Pleasant Green Water Company, president of the Lyman-Callister Company, and director of Heber J. Grant & Co. Bro. Lyman had experience in the Brigham Young University as a Priest, administering the Sacrament and doing other similar service. From the fall of 1895 to the summer of 1896 he acted as a counselor to Bryant S. Hinckley, superintendent of the Mutual Improvement Associations of the Utah Stake, when the Utah Stake embraced all of Utah county. In 1897 (Sept. 12th), he was ordained a High Priest by President Angus M. Cannon and set apart as superintendent of the YMMIA of Salt Lake Stake, which Stake then included the whole of Salt Lake County. He continued to serve in this capacity until the spring of 1902, when he, with his family, went to the University of Chicago, and later to Cornell University. For several years Bro. Lyman acted as supervisor of the parents' classes of the Ensign Stake. He was ordained an Apostle and set apart as a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles by President Joseph F. Smith April 7, 1918, in the Salt Lake Temple, assisted by Presidents Anthon H. Lund and Charles W. Penrose and the members of the Council of the Twelve. Richard R. Lyman and his wife, Amy B. Lyman, had two children, namely, Wendell Brown Lyman, born Dec. 18, 1897, in Salt Lake City, and Margaret Lyman, born Sept. 15, 1903, at Ithaca, New York. Despite the greatness of his intellect, his spiritual achievements and a distinguished ancestry, Elder Lyman fell into transgression and was excommunicated November 12, 1943. It is not the policy of the Church to publicize the reasons for disciplinary action, but it was the result of a personal transgression and not apostasy. Richard R. Lyman was rebaptized into the Church October 27, 1954. He died December 31, 1963 at Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1941, Richard R. Lyman started the Emeritus Club of the BYU Alumni Association, and he was elected its first president. About 150 "oldtimers" gathered for the first Alumni Emeritus Banquet during commencement week of 1941. Diantha Billings Worsley, Emma Stubbs Taylor, Alice Smoot Newell, Mary E. Cluff Little (?), Charles Albert Glazier, and Samuel ~ ~ BRIEF BIOGRAPHY: Richard R. Lyman (1879–1963) Born in Fillmore, Utah. Married to Amy Brown; two children. He attended Brigham Young College in Logan, Utah, and Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah. He later attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and earned a doctorate degree in engineering from Cornell University. He served as head of the Department of Engineering at the University of Utah. In 1918 he was ordained as an Apostle and he then served as Assistant Commissioner of Education under then-Elder David O. McKay, who was Church Commissioner of Education. He then served as president of the European Mission from 1936 to 1938. He was excommunicated in 1943 but was rebaptized in 1954. Source.

Maeser, Karl Gottfried (1828 - 1901)

Maeser, Karl Gottfried (1828 - 1901)
Provo, Utah US

Karl & Anna & Emilie Maeser

One of the First BYA Faculty & Staff. Karl G. Maeser, Pedagogy, 1876-1892. Legendary Second Principal of BY Academy from 1876 to 1892. Board of Trustees, Brigham Young Academy, 1891 to 1901. ~~~~ Karl Gottfried Maeser, the first principal of Brigham Young University and general superintendent of the LDS Church school system, was born on 16 January 1828 in Saxony, Germany. He graduated with high honors from the Friedrichstadt Schullehrerseminar, a teacher-training college in Dresden, in May 1848. He worked as a teacher in Dresden, as a private tutor in Bohemia, and as vice-director of a school in Dresden. He married Anna Mieth, the school director's daughter, in 1854. Maeser first heard of the LDS Church through an anti-Mormon pamphlet. Rather than turning him away, it piqued his interest, and he wrote for more information. After some effort on his part, missionaries finally agreed to come to Dresden to teach him, and in October 1855 he was baptized. The LDS Church organized a branch in Dresden with the eight members, and Maeser was sustained as presiding elder. Like other Mormons, Maeser wanted to immigrate to "Zion"--that is, Utah. Although he left Germany in 1856, he did not arrive in Utah until 1860. In the years between he served a church mission to Scotland, organized church branches and labored with Germans in London area, worked in Philadelphia to earn money to go west, and served a mission in Virginia. After arriving in Utah, Maeser renewed his work as a teacher and school administrator. He helped organize schools in the Fifteenth and Twentieth wards in Salt Lake City and tutored Brigham Young's children; he also worked as Tabernacle organist and as an accountant. After serving a mission to Germany and Switzerland from 1867 to 1870, he taught briefly at the University of Deseret. He later returned to the Twentieth Ward Seminary. In 1875 he married Emilie Damke, a German immigrant, as a plural wife. In 1875 Brigham Young purchased the financially troubled Timpanogos branch of the University of Deseret and changed its name to the Brigham Young Academy. He asked Maeser in 1876 to go to Provo to establish a church school, explaining, "Brother Maeser, I want you to remember that you ought not to teach even the alphabet or the multiplication tables without the Spirit of God." During the next sixteen years, Maeser struggled to build a school. Initially, he was not only the principal, but also the teacher, chorister, organist, janitor, recruiter, fund-raiser, and fan club. He took the school from a small student body of only twenty-nine students who academically were only at the fifth reader level to an enrollment of more than 400 students in several departments including a normal school. Under his direction, Brigham Young Academy became one of the principal schools in the Utah Territory. Maeser was able to combine academic concerns, religious beliefs, and character development as part of the students' education. Maeser was appointed the first general superintendent of LDS Church schools in 1888, but he was not released from his responsibilities at the Brigham Young Academy until 1892. In 1889 the Mormon Church Board of Education gave Maeser a degree of Doctor of Letters and Didactics. He published his views of education in School and Fireside in 1898. Maeser died on 15 February 1901. It was not uncommon for Karl G. Maeser and his staff to receive less than one-half pay during the 1880s. The faith of BYU’s founders was never stronger than during times of crisis. I was particularly impressed with Karl G. Maeser’s conviction as he responded to Reed Smoot, a student, during the 1884 fire that destroyed the Academy’s only building. As it became apparent that they could not save the Lewis building, the student said to Maeser, “Oh, Brother Maeser, the Academy is burned!” Maeser responded, “No such thing, it’s only the building.” Six years earlier, shortly after the death of Brigham Young, Maeser had a dream in which President Young showed him the design of a new building. At the time Brother Maeser did not understand the purpose of the dream. Six years later, as he looked at the charred ruins of Lewis Hall, he could see in his mind’s eye the building that would take its place. Each time a crisis threatened the survival of the school, the heavens were opened and instructions given. Principal Maeser’s dream about the new building was the first. A second occurred a few years later in the mid-1880s. During one of the darkest hours, when it seemed that the school would close, Brigham Young appeared to President John Taylor, assuring him of the school’s importance in the kingdom and giving him instructions for its survival. In the dream President Young said that “Christ himself was directing, and had a care over [the] school.” See also.

McKay, David Oman

McKay, David Oman

David and Emma Ray McKay

Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1970. Eighth President of the BYU and BYH Board of Trustees, 1951 to 1970. David Oman McKay was the ninth President of the Church of Jesus Christ. More than any other President of the Church, he looked like a prophet and undoubtedly could have been chosen by his friend Cecil B. DeMille to play one in the movies. David O. McKay was born September 8, 1873 in Huntsville, Utah as the third child of David McKay and Jennette Evans McKay. His childhood saw both tragedy and hardship when at the age of six, two older sisters died and then scarcely a year later, his father was called to a mission. David O. became the man of the house. Through hard work and frugal management, he and his mother ran the family farm so well that they were to surprise his father with a much needed addition to the house when he returned from his mission. Young David continued to attend school, work on the farm, and, during the summer, deliver the Ogden Standard Examiner to a nearby mining town. He had an insatiable hunger for learning, and during his round trips on horseback, he spent much of the time reading and memorizing passages from the world's great literature that were later to permeate his sermons and writings. He also loved riding horses, swimming, and other sports; dramatics; debate; singing; and playing the piano with the Huntsville town orchestra. He graduated from the University of Utah in 1897 as Class President and Valedictorian. From 1897 to 1899, he served in Great Britain as Missionary, spending most of that time in Scotland, the land of his ancestry. He returned home in the fall of 1899 and accepted a teaching position at Weber Stake Academy. On January 2, 1901, he married Emma Ray Riggs in the Salt Lake Temple; they had seven children. He began a career in teaching and assumed that would be his lifetime vocation. He was fully satisfied with what he believed would be a lifelong career in education when in 1906 everything changed: three members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles died, and David O. McKay, at age thirty-two, was called to that quorum. Elder McKay was the most widely traveled Church leader of his day, an ambassador to a worldwide Church. In 1920-1921 he toured the missions of the world, stopping at many places never before visited by a General Authority. From 1922 to 1924, he was back in Europe, this time as president of the European Mission (see Europe). His success there became legendary, as he did much to improve the public image of the Church. He also revitalized missionary work by urging every Latter-day Saint to make a commitment to bring one new member into the Church each year. In later years he became famous for his motto "Every member a missionary," an emphasis that began in Europe in 1923. In addition, he urged the Saints to remain in Europe rather than to emigrate to America, promising them that one day the full program of the Church, including sacred temples, would be made available in their homelands. In 1934, Heber J. Grant chose David to be his Second Counselor in the First Presidency. Seventeen years later, he succeeded George Albert Smith to become President himself. President McKay's administration was one of unprecedented growth. Indeed, when he died, it was said that two thirds of the membership of the Church could remember no other President. Nevertheless, it was a period of challenges, many of them occasioned by that very growth. The first stakes outside of North America were organized during his administration. Finding local leadership in nations where the Gospel seed had only recently been planted caused much concern and the Brethren were constantly traveling to insure that false doctrine did not creep in to the newly organized stakes. President McKay was privileged to announce and later dedicate the Temple in Bern, Switzerland, one that perhaps set the pattern for the smaller Temples that are beginning to dot the land today. President McKay was a great innovator and needed to be to solve the myriad of problems the growing Church faced. In 1961 he authorized ordaining members of the First Council of the Seventy to the office of high priest, which gave them the right to preside at stake conferences and thus eased the growing administrative burdens of the Quorum of the Twelve, and in 1967 he inaugurated the position of Regional Representative of the Twelve. In 1965 he also took the unusual step of expanding the number of counselors in the First Presidency, as his own ability to function effectively became impaired with age. David O. McKay died January 18, 1970, well beloved by his people. At the time of his death, two out of every three members of the Church had known no prophet other than President McKay.

Merrill, Joseph F.

Merrill, Joseph F.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Joseph & Annie Merrill

Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1952. Joseph Francis Merrill was the son of Apostle Marriner W. Merrill and Maria L. Kingsbury, and was born at Richmond, Cache County, Utah, Aug. 24, 1868. He was baptized into the Church July 22, 1877. His first ordination to the Priesthood was to the office of a Teacher, and on Sept. 22, 1889, he was ordained an Elder by his father; he received the Priesthood of a Seventy Sept. 23, 1898, under the hands of Apostle Heber J. Grant. Brother Merrill was brought up on his father's farm in Richmond, where he attended the common schools till 1887, when he entered the University of Deseret as a normal student. He graduated from that institution in 1889, and in the fall of the same year he became a student in the University of Michigan, graduating in 1893 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. The summer of 1892 he spent as a student at Cornell University, and in the summer of 1894 he studied at the University of Chicago. In 1893-95 he was assistant professor of chemistry and physics in the University of Utah. During 1896-97 he studied physics and electrical engineering, in the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, and in the University of Chicago. After his return to Utah he resumed teaching again in the University of Utah; but after being elected Fellow in Physics in the Johns Hopkins University he went east once more and further continued his studies, till 1899, when he took the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the Johns Hopkins institution. An abstract of his doctorate thesis was published in the "Physical Review" for Feb. 1899. A later article by Dr. Merrill, embodying the results of original research was published in the same journal for March, 1900, an abstract of which article was also published in the "Physikalische Zeitshrift" of Germany. Doctor Merrill also served as professor of physics and electrical engineering in the University of Utah, and also principal of the State School of Mines, a department in the University. During his stay in Michigan, in 1892-93, he acted as presiding Elder of the "Mormon Colony" at Ann Arbor. In November, 1897, Elder Merrill was chosen as first assistant superintendent of the YMMIA of the Salt Lake Stake. He married Annie Laura Hyde, a daughter of Alonzo E. and Annie Taylor Hyde, June 9, 1898, which union was blessed with two children. During 1898-99 Brother Merrill and his wife labored as regularly anointed missionaries in Baltimore. Elder Merrill was looked upon as a conscientious Latter-day Saint and as a scholar of eminent ability. Elder Merrill served as a member of the General Board of YMMIA from 1927 to 1933. He was ordained an Apostle October 8, 1931 by President Heber J. Grant at the age of sixty-three. His ordination and placement in the Quorum of the Twelve were occasioned by the death of Elder Orson F. Whitney. One can only imagine the depth of discussions held between himself, and Elders James E. Talmadge, and John A. Widtsoe, contemporaries on the Twelve. Joseph F. Merrill died Feb. 3, 1952, at Salt Lake City.

Monson, Thomas S.
Office of the President
LDS Church
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Thomas & Frances Monson

Board of Trustees, 1964 to the present. Thomas Spencer Monson, born August 21, 1927, is the 16th and current president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a role which he assumed on February 3, 2008. President Thomas S. Monson had served as a Counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since November 10, 1985. More recently, on March 12, 1995, he was set apart as First Counselor to President Gordon B. Hinckley. Following the death of President Hinckley on January 27, 2008, he became President of the Church. Prior to that, on June 5, 1994, he had been called as Second Counselor to President Howard W. Hunter, and on November 10, 1985, as Second Counselor to President Ezra Taft Benson. He was ordained an Apostle and called to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on October 4, 1963, at the age of 36. President Monson served as president of the Church’s Canadian Mission, headquartered in Toronto, Ontario, from 1959 to 1962. Prior to that time he served in the presidency of the Temple View Stake in Salt Lake City, Utah, and as a bishop of the Sixth-Seventh Ward in that stake. Born in Salt Lake City, on August 21, 1927, President Monson is the son of G. Spencer and Gladys Condie Monson. He attended Salt Lake City public schools and graduated cum laude from the University of Utah in 1948, receiving a degree in business management. He did graduate work and served as a member of the College of Business faculty at the University of Utah. He later received his MBA degree from Brigham Young University. In April 1981, Brigham Young University conferred upon President Monson the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa. He was given the honorary degree, Doctor of Humane Letters, by Salt Lake Community College in June 1996. He is a member of Alpha Kappa Psi, an honorary business fraternity. President Monson served in the United States Navy near the close of World War II. He married Frances Beverly Johnson on October 7, 1948, in the Salt Lake Temple. They are the parents of three children: Thomas Lee Monson, Ann Frances Monson Dibb, and Clark Spencer Monson. They have eight grandchildren. Professionally, President Monson has had a distinguished career in publishing and printing. He became associated with the Deseret News in 1948, where he served as an executive in the advertising division of that newspaper and the Newspaper Agency Corporation. Later he was named sales manager of the Deseret News Press, one of the West’s largest commercial printing firms, rising to the position of general manager, which position he held at the time of his appointment to the Quorum of the Twelve in 1963. He served for many years as chairman of the board of Deseret News Publishing Co. President Monson is a past president of Printing Industry of Utah and a former member of the board of directors of Printing Industry of America. With his broad business background, President Monson served for many years as a board member of several prominent businesses and industries. He currently serves as a trustee of Brigham Young University and the Church Board of Education. Since 1969 President Monson has served as a member of the National Executive Board of Boy Scouts of America. President Monson has held membership in the Utah Association of Sales Executives, the Salt Lake Advertising Club, and the Salt Lake Exchange Club. For many years, President Monson served as a member of the Utah State Board of Regents, the body which governs higher education in the State of Utah. He also served as an officer in the Alumni Association of the University of Utah. In December 1981, President Monson was appointed by President Ronald Reagan to serve on the President’s Task Force for Private Sector Initiatives. He served in this capacity until December 1982, when the work of the task force was completed. President Monson was awarded the University of Utah’s Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1966. He is also the recipient of the Boy Scouts of America’s Silver Beaver Award (1971), its prestigious Silver Buffalo Award (1978), and international Scouting’s highest award, the Bronze Wolf (1993). In 1997 he received the Minuteman Award from the Utah National Guard, as well as Brigham Young University’s Exemplary Manhood Award. In 1998 he and Sister Monson were each given the Continuum of Caring Humanitarian Award by the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph Villa.

Morris, George Quayle

Morris, George Quayle
Salt Lake City, Utah US

George & Emma Morris

Board of Trustees, 1954 to 1962. George Quayle Morris, was born February 20, 1874, in Salt Lake City, a son of Elias Morris and Mary Lois Walker. He was baptized February 28, 1882, by John Cottam. He was ordained a Deacon Feb. 8, 1889, by Willard C. Burton; ordained a Teacher Feb. 27, 1892, by Thos. D. Lewis; ordained a Priest June 18, 1894, by Elias Morris; ordained an Elder April 13, 1896, by Andrew S. Gray; ordained a Seventy Sept. 13, 1899, by George Teasdale; set apart as a president in the second quorum of Seventy Aug. 19, 1904; and filled a mission to Great Britain in 1899-1902, during which he presided over the London Conference after laboring one year in Wales. On June 29, 1905, Elder Morris married Emma Ramsey, (daughter of Geo. W. Ramsey and Amanda Ross) a talented musician. Three daughters were born to them, namely, Marian, Margery and Helen. On September 8, 1908, he was ordained a High Priest by Rudger Clawson and called as first counselor in the Fourteenth Ward of Salt Lake City in which position he served for six years. On March 1914 he was ordained a Bishop and on June 21 set, apart to preside over the Fourteenth Ward, Salt Lake City, Elder Morris acted as stake superintendent of YMMIA in the Salt Lake Stake from 1904 to 1908, and again from June 1913 to June 1914. He moved into the Ensign Stake and from 1928 to 1935 served as a counselor in the presidency of the Ensign Stake. He became a member of the General Board of YMMIA in 1924 and on Jan. 26, 1935, when the superintendency of the YMMIA was reorganized, was appointed first assistant to Pres. Albert E. Bowen. Bro. Morris was president and manager of the Elias Morris and Sons Company, established by his father, with which firm he was associated from his youth. He was also active in civic enterprises, being an officer in the Community Chest and a director of the Traveler's Aid Society. Elder Quayle was named an Assistant to the Twelve on Oct. 6, 1951, a calling in which he would serve until April 8, 1954, when he was called as a member of that quorum. He was ordained an Apostle by President David O. McKay and sustained a member of the Twelve, replacing the deceased Matthew Cowley, where he would serve until his own death on April 23, 1962 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Biography.

Moyle, Henry Dinwoodey

Moyle, Henry Dinwoodey
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Henry & Clara Moyle

Board of Trustees, 1950 to 1963. Henry Dinwoodey Moyle was born April 22, 1889 at Salt Lake City to James H. Moyle and Alice E. Dinwoodey Moyle. Raised in the Church and baptized as a child, Elder Moyle married Clara Alberta Wright on October 16, 1919 at Salt Lake City, Utah. The union was blessed with the birth of eight children, one of whom died as a baby. Elder Moyle was called to preside over the Cottonwood Stake by 1929. He served until 1937. He was ordained an Apostle April 10, 1947 by President George Albert Smith and assumed his place in the Quorum of the Twelve. Elder Moyle spoke: "It goes without saying that we do in this Church what we are told. I have never understood that it was my privilege as a member of this Church, holding the priesthood, to say no. I have never had a desire in my heart to do anything other than that which the brethren direct. While I may feel as if some of the things that they have most recently asked me to do are beyond my power, nevertheless so far as my Heavenly Father will give me the power to act I shall do so, and all that I have and am belongs to my Heavenly Father. I had a grandfather who met with a very great disaster. All that he had was swept away by fire. His thoughts and his actions at the moment he was told of his loss have been on my mind for the past several minutes, and I must say I feel rather as he then felt: . . . the Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord. (Job 1:21.) "I know that the Lord can take that away which he giveth, if we give him cause so to do; that we may be the recipients of his blessings today but to continue to be such recipients, we must be obedient to his laws and his commandments." Elder Moyle served the Quorum honorably until June 12, 1959, when President David O. McKay called him to be his Second Counselor. He was sustained as First Counselor to President McKay October 12, 1961 a position in which he served until his death. President Moyle died September 18, 1963 at Deer Park, Florida.

Murdock, Royal  [or Joseph Royal]

Murdock, Royal [or Joseph Royal]
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Royal and 2 Murdock

BY Academy High School Commercial Class of 1903 (final BYA class year - the next year, BYH). Royal J. Murdock of Heber, Utah, graduated from the Commercial Class on Tuesday, May 26, 1903, in College Hall. Source 1: Program, BYA Commercial Class 1903. ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: BYA High School Class of 1903. Royal J. Murdock also received a Certificate in Bookkeeping in 1903. Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 44. ~ ~ ~ ~ Board of Trustees, 1909 to 1932. Joseph Royal Murdock was born on August 11, 1858 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Nymphas Coridon Murdock and Sarah Melissia Barney. He first married Margaret Ashbridge Wright on November 18, 1878 in Salt Lake City. He second married Susan Ann Lynch on September 8, 1926, in Salt Lake City. He died May 26, 1931 in Salt Lake City. Interment, Heber City, Utah. Joseph Royal Murdock was one of the signers of the Utah Constitution in 1895. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1903. Royal J. Murdock of Heber, Utah, a High School student, BYU [& BYH] Class of 1903 Listing of Fourth Year Students (seniors). Source: Brigham Young Academy & Normal Training School, Catalogues & Announcements, for 29th Academic Year, 1904-1905, p. 174. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS SON'S OBITUARY: Stephen Royal Murdock, 84, died May 6, 1995 in St. George, Utah. Born January 16, 1911 in Provo, Utah, to Royal Joseph and Virginia Chipman Murdock. He married Virginia Madsen in 1936 and their marriage was later solemnized in the Manti LDS Temple. She died January 19, 1987. He married Elza Watkins Lee March 6, 1987 in the St. George LDS Temple. He was owner and operator of American Oil Distributorship in American Fork. He was a High Priest in the LDS Church and had served a mission to England. He was also a charter member of the Lion's Club.He is survived by his wife of Orem; a son, Paul and wife, Deanna Murdock, of American Fork; and a daughter, Cheryl Murdock (Craig) Farrell (BYH Class of 1966), of Smithfield, Utah; three stepchildren, Mrs. Hugh (Deanna) Haws, Riverton; E.J. Lee, Murray; Mrs. Craig (Linda) Smith, Pleasant Grove; 24 grandchildren, 41 great-grandchildren; sister, Mrs. Preston (Maurine) Hughes, Spanish Fork. Funeral Services were held on Wednesday in the Anderson & Sons Mortuary, 49 East 100 North, American Fork, where friends may call one hour prior to services. Burial, American Fork Cemetery. [Deseret News, Tuesday, May 9, 1995]

Packer, Boyd K.
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Boyd and Donna Packer

Board of Trustees, 1962 to the present. President Boyd K. Packer, the Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, was set apart to this position on June 5, 1994. Prior to becoming Acting President, he served as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, having been ordained an Apostle on April 9, 1970. Prior to this he served as an Assistant to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles for almost nine years. An educator by profession, his career includes service as supervisor of seminaries and institutes of religion for the Church and as a member of the Administrative Council of Brigham Young University. He studied at Weber College and subsequently received his bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Utah State University. He received an Ed.D. in educational administration from Brigham Young University. President Packer was born September 10, 1924, in Brigham City, Utah. He served as a bomber pilot during World War II in the Pacific theater. He has been active in community and civic affairs, including service as a city councilman. He has received several awards from civic and educational organizations and institutions. President Packer served as president of the New England Mission. He is the author of a number of books and other published works. He is an artist, particularly of birds. He is married to the former Donna Smith. They are the parents of ten children.

Page, Jonathan Socwell Jr.

Page, Jonathan Socwell Jr.
Payson, Utah US

Jonathan and Lilyus Page

Board of Trustees, 1903 to 1918. Jonathan Socwell Page, Jr., was born on May 14, 1856 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died on January 8, 1918 in Payson, Utah. Interment, Payson City Cemetery. His parents are Jonathan Socwell Page, Sr., and Mary Leever Page. He married Lilyus Millicent Curtis on May 23, 1878 in Salt Lake City, Utah. [Note: His middle initial is "S" not "L"]. His sister, Anna Maria Page, is a graduate in the BYA high school Class of 1882.

Partridge, Edward [Jr.]

Partridge, Edward [Jr.]
Provo, Utah US

Edward & Sarah/Eliz. Partridge

Board of Trustees, 1897 to 1900. Edward Partridge was born June 25, 1833 at Independence, Jackson County, Missouri. His parents were Edward Partridge (Sr.) and Lydia Clisbee Partridge. He married twice: Sarah Lucretia Clayton on February 4, 1858 in Salt Lake City, Utah; and Elizabeth Buxton on February 15, 1862 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died November 17, 1900 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah.

Petersen, Mark Edward

Petersen, Mark Edward
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Mark and Emma Petersen

Board of Trustees, 1950 to 1975. Mark E. Petersen was born November 7, 1900 at Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Christian Petersen and the former Chistine M. Andersen. He married Emma Marr McDonald. The couple had two children. Elder Petersen was a newspaper editor. He became editor of the Deseret News in 1946 after working as a reporter, news editor, and manager. He wrote editorials for the Church News, a weekly supplement, until his death in January 1984. He was sustained to the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and ordained an Apostle April 20, 1944 at the age of forty-four, by President Heber J. Grant. On June 1, 1959, Mark E. Petersen dedicated Taiwan to the preaching of the gospel, reinvoking Elder McKay's 1921 dedication of the entire Chinese realm. Elder Petersen served in the Council of the Twelve with honor and distinction until his death January 11, 1984 at Salt Lake City, Utah.

Reece, Joseph

Reece, Joseph

Joseph Reece

Board of Trustees, 1918 to 1938. [His middle initial may have been "A" -- so listed under a photograph in The First One Hundred Years, a history of BYU.]

Previous Page 1 2 3 4 Next Page