BYA~BYH Faculty & Staff


Alphabetical Alumni

Christensen, Ione
Provo, Utah US

Ione Iversen?

Faculty & Staff. Ione Christensen, 1941-1943. ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? Ione Dagmar Christensen Iversen was born on June 5, 1911 in Elwood, Box Elder County, Utah. Her parents were Rudolph Alexander Christensen and Sylvia Emeline Hansen Christensen. She married Claud Richard Iversen on January 6, 1933 in Brigham City, Utah. He was born on October 21, 1909 in Bear River City, Utah. His parents were Peter Martin Iversen and Augusta Eliza Nielsen. Claude Iversen died on October 27, 1988. Ione Christensen Iversen died at the age of 83 on June 15, 1994 in Sandy, Utah. Her interment, Riverview Cemetery, Tremonton, Utah.

Christensen, Lillian Anderson

Christensen, Lillian Anderson
Provo, Utah US

Lillian and Willard Smith

Faculty & Staff. BYU Training School Teacher, Second Grade, 1950s. Lillian Anderson Christensen married twice: First, on December 12, 1931 to Herbert K. Christensen in Beaver, Utah. He died on January 21, 1950 in Provo, Utah. She married second, on June 29, 1963, to Willard Grant Smith in Salt Lake City, Utah. She earned her pilot's license so she could fly with her husband, Willard, in his single engine plane, and be capable of flying the plane herself. Lillian worked at the "Gathering Place" to help kids turn their lives around. When Lillian was diagnosed with cancer, she went through chemotherapy and lost her hair. During that time, George H. W. Bush (the first Bush president) flew into the Provo Airport to present his "Point of Light" award to Lillian, because of her work helping youth improve their lives. "She wore a wig for that occasion," said Carol Davis, Lillian's stepdaughter. "President Bush flew into Provo in a small plan, not his big president's plane." Lillian died about five weeks before Willard G. Smith died. HER OBITUARY: Lillian Anderson Christensen Smith died on November 6, 1996 after a lingering illness. She was born in Parowan, Utah on September 24, 1912 to Niels Albert Anderson and Amy Deslie Lowe Anderson. Lillian's funeral services were held Monday, November 11, 1996, in Provo. Interment, Springdale City Cemetery (Washington County). The family suggested contributions to the "Gathering Place", 251 E. 1200 South, Orem, UT 84058, in Lillian's Name. [Deseret News, November 9, 1996.] ~ ~ ~ ~ HER HUSBAND'S OBITUARY: Willard G. Smith, 85, died suddenly of a heart attack at his home in Provo on Monday, December 16, 1996. Born May 12, 1911 in Salt Lake City to Willard Richards and Florence Grant Smith. He was raised and educated in Salt Lake and graduated from University of Utah. He served a German - Austrian mission in 1931-33. He married Virginia Buist in the Salt Lake Temple in 1936 and they had three daughters. She died January 22, 1962. He later married Lillian Christensen in 1963; she passed away last month, November 6, 1996. Willard served the community as an active member and president of the Provo Kiwanis Club. He also was a member of the UACPA Association and received honorary awards for outstanding service. He was an accountant both by profession and hobby, was a member of Riverside Country Club, where he enjoyed the association of the 30/30 club. He was an avid golfer, enjoyed photography, gardening, and was a pilot and enjoyed traveling in his plane. He was a member of Dineorators and Silver Slipper Clubs. Very active in the LDS Church, he enjoyed serving in many callings. He is survived by his daughters, Annette (Walter) Hill of Missoula, Montana; Carole (Ross) Davis, and Ellen (Gary) Madsen, of Provo; son, Eldon (Antoinette) Christensen of Playa del Rey, CA; daughter-in-law, Carol Ann Christensen of Centerville; sister, Florence (Ted) Jacobsen; brothers, Richard (Margorie), Briant (Ceciel), Howard (Carole), and Paul (Genevieve) Smith, and Henry (Joan) Tanner, all of Salt Lake City; 21 grandchildren; and 39 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wives, Virginia and Lillian; brother, Heber Smith; sister, Sarah Tanner; and son, Albert Christensen. Funeral services were held Friday, December 20, 1996, in Provo. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Wednesday, December 18, 1996.]

Clark, Hazel Jean Cook

Clark, Hazel Jean Cook
Provo, Utah US

Hazel and DaCosta Clark

Faculty and Staff. BYU Laboratory School & BYU College of Education, total 23 years. BYU Elementary 4th Grade Teacher 1959-1960. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Hazel Jean Cook Clark, former Provo resident and wife of the late Dr. DaCosta Clark, died June 20, 2000, at the home of her daughter in Denver, Colorado. Hazel was the only daughter of David W. Cook and Jean Cook. She had six brothers who predeceased her: William, Cecil, Dewey, Loyal, Grant and Blaine. Hazel was born November 14, 1907, in Fountain Green, Utah. In 1918, the family moved to Logan, Utah, where she attended elementary school, high school, and the Brigham Young College of Logan. She earned a B.S. from the University of Utah; attended Teachers College, Columbia University; and completed an M.S. at Brigham Young University. Hazel was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served in many callings at the ward and stake level. She was an accomplished pianist, organist, and chorister who loved music; she began playing the organ for the Logan 11th Ward when she was twelve years old. Music and the gospel were always integral parts of her life. Hazel loved, appreciated and enjoyed children. During her professional career in early childhood education, Hazel taught in the Jordan School District, in Boston, Massachusetts; and for six years at the Edith Bowen School in Logan, Utah. For twenty-three years Hazel taught at Brigham Young University, first at the Laboratory School on Lower Campus and then in the College of Education teacher preparation program. Hazel has always been an inspiration and influence for good to all who knew her. Hazel is survived by her children and their spouses: Laura Clark (Lynn) Stewart of Logan, Utah; Cecil [BYH Class of 1954] and Gaile Clark of Provo, Utah; Mary Clark [BYH Class of 1958~H] (Larry) Gill, and David [BYH Class of 1963] and Lisa Clark of Denver, Colorado; 21 grandchildren and 41 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Monday, June 26, 2000, at the Oak Hills 9th Ward LDS Chapel, 1960 North 1500 East, Provo. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Friday, June 23, 2000.]

Clark, Joshua Reuben III

Clark, Joshua Reuben III
Provo, Utah US

Reuben and Emily Clark

Faculty & Staff. J. Reuben Clark III. J. Reuben Clark III, Instructor in Languages, 1941-1945. Joshua Reuben Clark III was born November 13, 1908, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He married Emily Anderson on September 7, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died August 13, 1992. His parents: J. Reuben Clark, Jr., & Luacine Annetta Savage Clark. The J. Reuben Clark III Memorial Lecture in Classics and the Classical Tradition is sponsored by the Department of Humanities, Classics, and Comparative Literature of Brigham Young University. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY: J. Reuben Clark III, age 83, died at home August 13, 1992. He was born November 23, 1908, in Salt Lake City, a son of J. Reuben Clark, Jr., and Luacine Savage Clark. He married Emily Anderson Sept. 7, 1934, in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. After his formal education at the University of Utah and Columbia University in New York, he began his teaching career in Cedar City. He taught at Brigham Young University for 51 years. He taught the classical languages and French, and was appointed department head for both Asian and Classical Languages, and Classical and Biblical languages. He received the Maeser Distinguished Teaching Award in 1980. In addition to his university work, he owned and operated the family farm in Grantsville. He was a member of the LDS Church and served a mission to France. He also served in a bishopric in New York, as bishop of BYU 50th ward and in the stake presidency of the BYU 8th Stake. In his later years, he was a temple worker in the Provo Temple. He is survived by his wife, Emily of Provo; and by two sisters, Louise C. Bennion and Luacine C. Fox of Salt Lake. He was preceded in death by a sister, Marianne C. Sharp. Funeral services were held Monday, August 17, 1992 in Provo. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Friday, August 14, 1992.]

Clark, Mary Deane [Peterson,] (FS 47-51)

Clark, Mary Deane [Peterson,] (FS 47-51)
Provo, Utah US

Mary Deane & Harold Clark

Faculty & Staff 1947 to 1951. (See Mary Deane Peterson.) Mary Deane Peterson first married Art Gilbert, then Harold Glen Clark, then Glenn Andrew. Harold Glen Clark was the first dean of the BYU Division of Continuing Education, and he served that Division for 26 years. He left that position to become the first President of the Provo Temple. On December 20, 1950, Mary Deane Peterson Gilbert married Dr. Harold Glen Clark in the Arizona Mesa Temple and became mother to his five children and her two children. Her eighth child, Rebecca Clark [BYH Class of 1971], was born in 1953. Mary Deane and her husband were called as the first president and matron of the newly constructed Utah Provo Temple from 1971 to 1976. Mary Deane was the initiator of the temple schedule that is still in use today in temples throughout the world. From 1978 to 1979, they served an eighteen-month diplomatic mission to Sri Lanka. During their service, the LDS Church was officially recognized in that country for the first time, the Book of Mormon was translated into Singhalese, and microfilming of birth and death records was begun. Upon their return, Harold Glen Clark suffered a massive stroke and Mary Deane took care of him faithfully and lovingly for five years. He passed away March 2, 1984. She passed away on April 13, 2006. ~ ~ ~ ~ Harold Glen Clark first married Virginia Louise Driggs. Harold G. Clark was born June 11, 1902 in Mesa, Arizona. His parents were Joseph William Clark and Mary Adeline Noble Clark. He married Virginia Louise Driggs on June 26, 1929, in Mesa, Arizona. She was born on July 29, 1909 in Driggs, Idaho. She died on March 16, 1950, in Provo, Utah. Together they had six children: Carol Jean Clark, Harold Glen Clark (Jr), Mary Louise Clark, Donald Driggs Clark, Virginia Lynn Clark, and Joseph William Clark. Following the death of Virgina Louise Driggs Clark, he second married Mary Deane Peterson Gilbert on December 20, 1950 in the Mesa, Arizona temple for time. Together they had one daughter: Rebecca Clark. Harold Glen Clark publication: The Golden years of Continuing Education at Brigham Young University, 1971. Call Number: UA SC 47 Abstract: A fiftieth year anniversary pamphlet for the Division of Continuing Education.

Clark, Welsford H.

Clark, Welsford H.
Orem, Utah US

Gus and Delaine Clark

Faculty & Staff. Welsford H. "Gus" Clark taught 5th and 6th Grade in the BYU Laboratory Elementary School for a number of years. His parents are Herald R. Clark and Mabel Hone Clark. He is also Professor Emeritus of Education, McKay School of Education, Brigham Young University. He retired after 37 years as a teacher. He married Delaine Anderson. Welsford Hone "Gus" Clark is one of six sons born to Herald R. Clark and Mabel Hone Clark. The family lived in Provo, Utah. His five brothers include: Richard Hone Clark (1916-1985), Dr. Stephen Hone Clark (1919-1987), Homer Hone Clark (1921-2010), Rand Hone Clark (1925-2007), and Dr. Phillip Hone Clark. His education included: B.S. BYU 1956, and M.Ed., BYU, 1962. Gus married Delaine, and they live in Orem, Utah. In 2012, Gus Clark is 80 years old. The Gus and Delaine Clark family includes: Brittney Ann Clark, Cabe Riso Clark, Christopher Anderson Clark, Gunnar C Clark, Jeana Peterson Clark, Kelly Anderson Clark, and Lee Anderson Clark. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Welsford Hone "Gus" Clark passed from his earthly mission on February 5th, 2013. Gus was born on January 21st, 1932 in Provo, Utah to Herald Ray Clark and Mable Hone Clark. He was sealed to his eternal companion Delaine Anderson on August 16th, 1955 in the Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter- Day Saints. Together they raised four children: Chris, Lee, Suzanne, and Rachel. Gus was a professor of elementary education at Brigham Young University for 38 years, retiring in 1994. His passion for teaching children and those who taught them was unmatched. Besides teaching at the university, Gus also taught fifth and sixth grades at the Brigham Young Elementary Training School at various times during his career and was influential in many of his students' lives outside of the normal teacher-student relationship. Many of his young students remained life-long friends. He was always willing to help them with advice and counsel with them in time of need. After his retirement, Gus and Delaine served missions at the Missionary Training Center [MTC] in Provo, the Philippines, Thailand, and Roosevelt, Utah. Gus was a life-long missionary exemplifying the Savior in the way he approached everyone he met. He was always seeking ways to help others grow in life. He was an influence for good in all whom he came in contact with. He was especially loved by his grandchildren and spent many summer nights with them at his cabin near Aspen Grove or at his historical home in Moroni, Utah. Gus enjoyed classic music, fine art, reading and maybe the "occasional" visit to Deseret Industries [D.I.] to collect many of his hidden treasures. We love you Dad, and will miss your presence in our lives. Gus is survived by his wife of 57 years, Delaine Clark of Orem, their children Chris (Kelly) Clark of Lindon, Lee (Jeana) Clark of Orem, Suzanne (Walter) Kelly of Las Vegas, and Rachel (Mitch) Oviatt of Orem; He is also survived by 14 grand-children and 25 great-grand-children; Brother Philip (Ruth) Clark of Holladay. He was preceded in death by his parents and four older brothers: Richard, Stephen, Homer, and Rand Clark. Funeral services will be held Thursday, Feb 14, 2013 at 12:00 p.m. in the Cherry Hill Stake Center located at 1700 South 400 East, Orem. Friends may call Wednesday evening from 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at Berg Mortuary, 185 East Center Street, Provo and Thursday from 10:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. prior to services. Burial will be in the Provo City Cemetery. In-lieu of flowers, the family requests that you purchase a children's book and spend precious time reading it to a child. Welsford H. "Gus" Clark [Deseret News, February 9, 2013] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Delaine Anderson Clark passed from her earthly mission on November 13, 2013. Delaine was born on March 6, 1926 in Idaho Falls, Idaho to Orial Lewis and Delia Lee Anderson. She was sealed to her eternal companion Welsford H. Gus Clark on August 16, 1955 in the Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Together they raised four children: Chris, Lee, Suzanne, and Rachel. After graduating from high school and university studies she continued her education in nursing, graduating as a certified, registered nurse anesthetist. Her kindness and care for her patients was unparalleled. Her concern extended beyond her patients to their families. At times she invited families of patients from out of town to stay at her home when they had nowhere else to go. Delaine served a full-time mission for the LDS Church in the Northern States Mission which included Illinois and Wisconsin at a time when few women served as missionaries. She was an active and faithful member of the LDS Church throughout her life. She was a woman possessed of deep faith. She was kind to all and was generous with her time and means. After her retirement Delaine and her husband served LDS Church missions in the Philippines, Thailand, Roosevelt, Utah and at the MTC in Provo, Utah. Delaine is survived by her children, Chris (Kelly) of Lindon, Lee (Jeana) of Orem, Suzanne (Walter) Kelly of Las Vegas, and Rachel (Mitch) Oviatt of Orem; She is also survived by 14 grand-children and 25 great-grand- children, her brother Ethan Anderson of Ammon, Idaho and her sister Avon Andrews of St. George, Utah. Delaine was preceded in death by her husband Welsford (Gus), her brothers Marion and Joseph and her sister Donna. Funeral services will be held Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 11:00 am in the Cherry Hill Stake Center, 1700 South 400 East, Orem, Utah. Friends may call Wednesday evening, November 20, 2013 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at Berg Mortuary, 185 East Center Street, Provo, Utah and Thursday, November 21, 2013 from 9:30 am to 10:45 am at the church prior to funeral services. Burial will be in the Provo City Cemetery. The family would like to extend their gratitude to the staff at Courtyard at Jamestown for the love and care they showed Delaine during the final months of her life. [Provo Daily Herald, November 17, 2013]

Clarke, A. John

Clarke, A. John
Orem, Utah US

John & Rissa+ Marian Clarke

Faculty & Staff. A. John Clarke, Physics, Mathematics, Theology, 1937-1948. Eleventh Principal of BY High School from 1946 to 1949. He served as Acting Principal in 1943. In 1945-46 taught Art. His first year as Principal was 1946-47, and he continued through 1947-1948, when he handed off the office to Herbert K. Christensen. BYU Archives: Clarke, A. John, Oral history interview, July 27, 1977. 1 volume. Call Number: UA OH 21, Abstract: Interview by C. Garn Coombs with A. John Clarke, BYU professor, concerning his experiences as a student at BYU during the late 1930's, and as an instructor and principal of BY High School in the mid-1940's. Also served a Provo City Commissioner 1981-1982. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Alva John Clarke, 87, of Orem died Saturday, December 30, 1995, in Provo, Utah. He was born July 3, 1908, in Magrath, Alberta, Canada, a son of Peter Gemmell and Vilate Green Clarke. He married Xarissa (Rissa) Merkley July 4, 1929, in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, and their marriage was solemnized July 23, 1929, in the Alberta Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She died August 17, 1986, in Provo, Utah. He married Marian Green Stephens May 8, 1987, in Rexburg, Idaho, and they make their home in Orem, Utah. He was educated in Magrath schools and obtained a teaching certificate from Calgary Normal School. He was a teacher and principal in Canada before coming to Brigham Young University. He was a member of the faculty of BYU for 35 years until his retirement in 1973. He was principal of BY High School, a professor of education administration, assistant dean and acting dean of the College of Education at BYU. He earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Brigham Young University and an Ed.D. from the University of Colorado in 1950. With his wife Rissa, he worked in Iran as an advisor in the Point IV Program to revise the curriculum of the secondary schools and returned there at the request of the Minister of Education to further that work and to be an advisor to the Chancellor of the University of Tehran. In 1967 he went to Washington D.C. where he aided the U.S. Office of Education as Chief of Program Management for the Follow-Through program of Head Start. Active in civic concerns, he was a long-time member of the Provo Kiwanis Club, the BYU Cougar Club, and was involved with the AARP and Timpanogas Transit Authority, serving each as president. In 1980 he was elected Provo City Commissioner serving with Anagene Mecham and Major James Ferguston. He was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was a high priest in Suncrest 2nd Ward at the time of his death. He served as bishop in Canada and in Provo. He is survived by his wife, Marian of Orem, Utah; one son and four daughters, Margaret Riley, Kaysville, Utah; Sybil (Roger) Ferguson, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jack A. (Marilyn) Clarke, Rexburg, Idaho; Jill (Alan) Harris, Cleveland, Ohio; and Kathryn (Paul) Williams, Mesa, Arizona. His stepchildren are Kay (Arlan) Mortensen, Pocatello, Idaho; Greg M. (Linda) Stephens, Sweet Home, Oregon; Roger C. (Julie) Stephens, Salem, Oregon; Courtney G. (Kelly) Stephens, St. George, Utah. He was preceded in death by his parents; four brothers and two sisters, Peter Drew, James Green, Jesse, Wilson, Jennie, and Sarah Elizabeth (Sadie); and by grandchildren, Peter Riley and Ann Harris. Funeral services were held Wednesday, January 3, 1996 in Orem, Utah. Interment, American Fork City Cemetery. [Published in the Deseret News, Monday, January 1, 1996.]

Clarke, Margaret

Clarke, Margaret
Olympia, Washington US

Margaret ( Peg) Riley

Class of 1949. Margaret (Peg) Clarke Riley. Notre Maison, Thespians. She graduated from BYH on May 26, 1949. Source: 1949 BYH Graduation Exercises Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Daughter of BYH Principal A. John Clarke. Faculty & Staff Early 1950s. Her Parents: Alva John Clarke and Xarissa (Rissa) Merkley, married in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada in 1929. They had four daughters and one son: Margaret “Peg” Clarke Riley [BYH Class of 1949]; Sybil Clarke [BYH Class of 1952~Honorary] (Roger) Ferguson; Jill Clarke [BYH Class of 1954] (Alan) Harris; and Kathryn Clarke [BYH Class of 1961] (Paul) Williams. (See photo of Peg on the Class of 1949 reunions page.) ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Margaret (Peg) Clarke Riley, 79 of Kearns, Utah, died peacefully in her home after a short illness on March 1, 2011. She was born May 17, 1931 in Magrath, Alberta, Canada to Alva John Clarke and Xarissa Merkley. She married Magellan Edward Riley on June 16th, 1956 in Reno, Nevada. Their marriage was solemnized in the Washington D.C. Temple of The Church of Latter-day Saints in May of 1982. She was proud of all of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren and she and delighted in their accomplishments. Just days before she died, she was thrilled to hear that she had a new great grandchild on the way. Peg lived a very full and active life right up until the end. She was active in bowling leagues and attended many national tournaments. She golfed whenever the weather was good. She enjoyed traveling both in the U.S. and abroad. Peg was actively involved in the Red Hat Society. She expressed her wonderful creativity through her oil paintings as well as sewing, knitting, crocheting and decorating for herself and others. Peg graduated from Brigham Young High School in Provo, Utah in the Class of 1949. She attended Brigham Young University as well as the LDS Business School in Salt Lake City. Peg was preceded in death by her husband Ed and her son Peter as well as her parents. Peg is survived by her children John and his wife Lisa of West Jordan, Utah; Elizabeth Kandu (Betsy) and her wife Lee of Tlajomulco de Zuniga, Mexico; Patricia Montana and her husband David of Norcross, Georgia; and Timothy and his wife Charlotte of Lawrenceville, Georgia. She has 14 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Peg is also survived by her dear friend, Kent Broadhead [BYH Class of 1949]. Peg leaves behind one brother, Jack Clarke of Orem, Utah, and three sisters: Sybil Clarke Ferguson of Scottsdale, Arizona, Jill Clarke Harris of St. George, Utah, and Kathy Clarke Williams of Mesa, Arizona. A memorial service will be held Saturday, March 5th, 11:00 a.m. at the LDS Jordan Stake Center, 3750 West 4700 South, West Valley City. [Deseret News, Thursday, March 3, 2011]

Clinger, Morris Martin

Clinger, Morris Martin
Provo, Utah US

Morris & Louise Clinger

Faculty & Staff. Morris M. Clinger, Instructor in Speech, Dramatic Art, Public Speaking, 1936-1946. Hobby: speedboating. ~ ~ ~ ~ Morris M. Clinger, Publications: ~ ~ A History of Theater in Mormon Colleges and Universities, by Morris M. Clinger. Book [thesis - dissertation manuscript], University of Minnesota, 3 editions, published 1963. ~ ~ An Analysis of Twelve Speeches of Parley P. Pratt, Mormon Orator, by Morris M. Clinger. Book, [thesis - dissertation manuscript] M.A., Brigham Young University, Department of Speech, published 1946. ~ ~ Interview with Morris M. Clinger, by J. J. Keeler. Book [thesis - dissertation manuscript], Brigham Young University History [no date given]. ~ ~ ~ ~ [Story about Clinger's role in the 1940 Provo Easter pageant.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Morris Martin Clinger was born on May 20, 1910 at Lake View, Utah. His parents were Martin Albert Clinger and Tean [or Tenie, Teenie, or Tina] Johnson Clinger. Martin and Teenie had six children: including Herschel Clinger, Morris Martin Clinger, Alta Clinger Davis, and Clifton Dee Clinger. Morris Clinger married Louse Spafford on August 17, 1932 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Morris served as a speech teacher at BYH until he moved to the upper campus to work in the BYU Speech Department, where he taught until his retirement. Morris M. Clinger died on April 7, 1993 in Orem, Utah.

Cluff, Benjamin, Jr.

Cluff, Benjamin, Jr.
Provo, Utah/Mexico/Calif US

Benjamin Cluff

BYA High School Class of 1883. Benjamin Cluff, Jr. Faculty & Staff. Teacher of Mathematics, Psychology and Bookkeeping, 1882-1903. Third Principal of BY Academy 1892-1895, first President of Brigham Young Academy. In 1903 BYA became Brigham Young University, and so for a matter of months he served as the first President of BYU. ~ ~ ~ ~ Benjamin Cluff, Jr., was born February 7, 1858 in Provo, Utah to Benjamin Cluff, Sr. and Mary Ellen Foster Cluff. His father was a mechanic and carpenter, and his mother was a pioneer of 1852. When Benjamin Jr. was seven years old, he traveled to the Sandwich Islands -- now Hawaii -- to join his father who was on a mission there. Benjamin lived in Laie for five years. He quickly learned the Hawaiian language. He assisted in building the first sugar mill and participated in the manufacturing of sugar. He also helped pick the first cotton crop grown in the islands. The islanders and the Indians fascinated young Benjamin, and he formulated Book of Mormon research to test whether there was any truth in his theory of emigration from the mainland to the islands of the Pacific. Ethnology and archeology came to life for the young scholar. When he was twelve years of age, Benjamin Jr. returned to Logan, Utah to help his father in the carpentry business. He didn't like attending school until, at the age of fifteen, a sudden change in attitude set him on a search for knowledge and an education. At seventeen his uncle, William W. Cluff, then President of the Summit Stake, invited Benjamin Jr. to come to Coalville, Utah where the young man worked in the tithing office and in the post office for two years. He also became librarian of the Coalville City Library and delighted in the opportunity to peruse the books held in the library. Surrounded by knowledge and thirsting for more, he decided to travel to Provo, where he hoped to attend the newly established Brigham Young Academy. In May of 1877, undeterred by the 65-mile distance between himself and campus, Benjamin Jr. set out for Brigham Young Academy on foot. He carried only an umbrella and a small bundle of clothing. After stopping overnight to visit an uncle on a ranch between Park City and Kamas, he got a ride just outside of Park City, and soon the nineteen-year-old man arrived in Provo. Harvey H. Cluff, a director of the new Academy, introduced the young man to its brand-new principal, Karl G. Maeser. The principal reportedly shook Cluff's hand and gave him a warm greeting. "It is an honor and a pleasure to meet and welcome into our school a young man with an ambition to fit himself for service in God's kingdom," Maeser said. "You will be happy here." The young man dedicated himself to attend the Academy, which was then located in the Lewis Building, but the first school year was just three weeks from closing. During the summer he was employed hauling coal and supplies between Provo and Coalville. His father offered him a one-third interest in a good farm in Wasatch County, but the son told his father, "If you release me to go to school, I will never ask you for assistance." The next morning Cluff was in Provo and began attending BY Academy classes. It was the fall term of 1877, and he was hired as a part-time janitor to help him with his expenses. Benjamin Jr. excelled as a student, and was invited to become a member of the Normal Class. Soon he was appointed a teacher in the BY Academy Primary Department. He studied school organization and continued with his education until one day Principal Maeser called him to his office and informed him that the Church needed missionaries in the Islands. Cluff had lived there, and still spoke the native language. Benjamin wondered aloud if he should not first finish his schooling, but Principal Maeser assured him that his schooling was primarily intended to prepare him for a mission, and that his mission would prepare him for life. Though the call was unexpected and school was just starting, he left in October of 1878, served a successful mission in Hawaii, and returned to Brigham Young Academy in 1882. He graduated from the Academy's high school in the Class of 1883. He returned to Provo and Brigham Young Academy, where he was employed as an instructor. He joined the faculty along with former fellow Academy students, James E. Talmage, Joseph M. Tanner, and Joseph B. Keeler. On Sunday evening, January 27, 1884, a fire, which started in the chemistry lab, completely destroyed the Lewis building. The Academy moved into temporary quarters, including Provo's ZCMI warehouse. In August of 1884, Benjamin married Mary Jane John, the daughter of President David John, and was appointed Stake Superintendent of the Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association (YMMIA). Benjamin Cluff's education and mission experiences had given him a deep desire to further his education. In 1886, he requested and received a leave of absence from his teaching responsibilities. He made the trip to Ann Arbor, Michigan where he enrolled in the University of Michigan. There he purchased a coal oil lamp and began to study. He received his bachelor's and master's degree from this university. At the University of Michigan, Cluff distinguished himself as a scholar. He polished his skills in writing and debating by defending the doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in print and in open forums. While in Ann Arbor he debated before the student body a question of national interest, "Resolved, that Utah is ready for Statehood." That experience made him a marked man, and many challenges were hurled at him as long as he was on campus. He accepted as many debates and conferences as his schooling permitted. He graduated in the upper brackets of his class with a B.S. degree in 1890, one of the first Utahans to earn a degree from an eastern university. Cluff formed a close friendship with the president of the University of Michigan at that time, James Burrill Angell. This association influenced and enhanced his views on the future of higher education. While at the University of Michigan, Cluff was also exposed to the works of several of the most influential educators of his time, including Charles W. Eliot, John Dewey and Aaron B. Hinsdale. He became determined to bring many new educational ideas back to Brigham Young Academy and use them to strengthen the academic reputation of his young alma mater. In 1890 Cluff returned to Provo and Brigham Young Academy, where he was employed as an instructor in Mathematics. He was also appointed assistant principal. Between 1883 and 1903 he taught Primary Education, Mathematics, Psychology, Bookkeeping, and Didactics. In 1891 Professor Cluff launched a summer school designed to provide in-service training for teachers in the region. The instructor of the Summer School was to be a prominent educator. Colonel Francis W. Parker of the Cook County Normal College was the first instructor in 1892. Other instructors included James Baldwin from the University of Texas, and Burk A. Hinsdale from the University of Michigan. Cluff actively encouraged educators to come to Utah and share their knowledge with the students and faculty of Brigham Young Academy. In 1885, following the fire that devastated the Lewis Building, The Academy rented the upper story of Provo's ZCMI warehouse for the temporary use of the Academy. About the same time, a city block of land on Fifth North was purchased, and a large foundation was laid, only to lie dormant for seven years for lack of funding. When Benjamin Cluff returned from Ann Arbor, he became a vigorous leader in planning and working to complete the new building. By the late fall of 1892 the second and third stories were completed. Members of the Academy's Board came forward and mortgaged their own private property to aid in completing the facility. The curriculum for a four-year high school was designed, and in January of 1892, the school moved to its long-awaited new quarters. When the new Academy Building was dedicated on January 4, 1892, the principalship of the Academy formally passed from Karl G. Maeser to Benjamin Cluff, Jr. It was a memorable occasion and an estimated 1,000 people from all over the Utah Territory participated the ceremonies. At the time, beloved leader Karl G. Maeser said of himself and the new building, "The old man taught in a cabin, but they have built a palace for his boys." But when the dedicatory services for the Academy Building had ended, Benjamin Cluff, Jr., turned his full attention to the hard realities of his new position. Cluff lengthened class periods from half an hour to one hour, increased expectations of the faculty, increased the reading and writing requirements expected of students, and added new courses to the curriculum, including psychology, a subject new to western academia. He made every effort to organize the school as a leading normal training institution -- preparing LDS teachers for employment throughout the Church -- with full courses in kindergarten, primary, academic (high school), commerce, and missionary divisions. Much of this academic planning came directly from Benjamin Cluff. Even at this early date it was obvious that Cluff was working toward the goal of transforming the Academy into both a secondary school and a school of higher education -- a goal that was realized eleven years later in 1903. Upon being named Principal, Cluff had immediately identified three main problems that faced the Academy, and he began to work with his faculty, Board and Church leaders to solve them. The first problem was the emergence of a rival proposal to establish a university in Salt Lake City which would serve as the center of the Church's educational system. Cluff felt this move was a serious threat to the support and even the survival of Brigham Young Academy in Provo. The second problem was the alarming deterioration of the financial condition of the school during the last years of Principal Maeser's administration, significantly precipitated by the expense of the new building. And third, Cluff knew that in order to improve the scholastic standing and educational program of the Academy, he would need to seek and win greater and more dependable support from the General Authorities and the General Board of Education of the Church. The most serious of the three problems was the worst financial crisis in the history of the Academy — even worse than the many crises that had plagued the Maeser administration. The leaders of the LDS Church became very aware that the Church needed acceptable, educated leaders, and at their urging, Professor Cluff readily accepted the opportunity to return to Michigan in 1893 to obtain a Master's Degree, and then tour the leading schools in the northern U.S. and parts of Canada to obtain guidance for building the Provo curriculum. From the beginning, Brigham Young Academy was an independent private school. It was not officially sponsored by the LDS Church. It is true that it received some sporadic income from the charitable donations of private individuals and various LDS wards and stakes, and a small income from student tuition, but a significant factor was the sacrificial service of the faculty, many of whom survived by farming, and were paid little or nothing. Cluff soon came to the conclusion that the only real solution to the school's many financial problems was for the Academy to seek and obtain the official sponsorship and financial support of the LDS Church. He wrote that "one evening while returning from a walk down town and while studying deeply over the future of the Academy, the thought came to me like an inspiration: 'Give the school to the Church.' Immediately my mind was at rest. I knew that it was the right thing to do." Although similar suggestions had been made and rejected a number of times in the past, on July 18, 1896, he formally requested this action, and this time the Board of Trustees officially agreed to incorporate the primary, middle and high school, and the institution was adopted as an official educational institution of the LDS Church. Regarding the use of the title "Principal" and "President", on July 20, 1895 the BYA Board of Trustees determined that "Principal" would apply to heads of departments, and the title "President" would now apply to former principal Cluff, so he became the first President of Brigham Young Academy. Utah achieved statehood in 1896, and student registration was opened to non-Mormons for the first time. Cluff interviewed and hired the first non-Mormon to be employed on the regular faculty. Miss Abby Celestia Hale served for three years as director of the Elementary Training School. A teacher, she was the niece of Edward Everett Hale, US Senate Chaplain and author of the story, "Man Without A Country". Her work as adjudged to have achieved the highest standards. To further dignify the leadership of President Cluff, in 1898 the Board conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Didactics. By the time Cluff retired on December 23, 1903, BYA had become BYU, he had served as the first President of the University for about six months, and the school had begun to resemble other young universities of that era. The practices and standards established during Cluff’s administration continued to play a vital role in the evolving history of what would become Brigham Young High School and Brigham Young University. He established the foundation for future accreditation of the University in the 1920s. President Benjamin Cluff, Jr. was followed by President George Brimhall in 1903. Brimhall had served as the fourth Principal of the Academy's high school program from 1895 to 1900. "Benjamin Cluff was a strong and resourceful leader who ranks among the leading educators of Utah," according to Bryant Stringham Hinckley, one of Cluff's former students, who graduated from BYA high school in 1885. "In his prime he was a man to be reckoned with - a good organizer, fearless, and aggressive," said Hinckley. The following are some of the specific innovations and accomplishments of the Cluff administration: • Brigham Young Academy was dissolved in 1903, and was replaced by Brigham Young University and Brigham Young High School. • Class periods were lengthened from one-half hour to one hour, allowing teachers to present more material in a focused time period. • Cluff initiated a summer school to provide in-service continuing education for teachers in the region, and imported leading American educators as instructors. • BY Academy started a formal missionary training program to enhance the effectiveness of new missionaries. • Cluff formed the Student Loan Association, making it easier for students to stay in school until they had completed their programs. • Cluff stressed higher learning among faculty and students; many went east or to California for additional education. • Intercollegiate athletics were introduced to BYA, generating media attention and increased alumni loyalty. • The Athletic Association was organized, promoting safety and academic standards for athletes. • The Academy adopted school colors — blue and white — the first educational institution in Utah to do so. • Annie Pike Greenwood wrote the "College Song." • Class leaders were elected by students, beginning with the Class of 1891. Classes also selected mottos, class colors, and created class banners, fostering lifetime friendships. • Cluff instituted Founders Day, featuring concerts, dances, parades, ball games, athletic meets, cross-country races, and academic processions. • The school's first viable newspaper, the White and Blue, began publication. It became a vehicle for many types of progress. • Cluff persuaded leaders of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to incorporate BY Academy as an officially sponsored organization of the Church, and eventually, to add a university to the school. • The Alumni Association was organized, and it began to hold annual dinners and maintain historical records. • Several new facilities were endowed, including the Holt Laboratory of Physics, the Magleby Laboratory of Chemistry, the Hinckley Laboratory of Natural Sciences, the Beckstead Laboratory of General Mechanics, and the Warren Smith Library of General Science Works. • College Hall with its large auditorium, and the Elementary Training School Building with a gymnasium on its top floor, were built during his administration; the Missionary-Preparatory Building (later known as the Arts Building) was completed nine months after the end of his administration. • The student body grew from 386 to 825; the faculty increased from 28 to 57; and the library expanded from 1,053 to 5,432 volumes. By the time Benjamin Cluff, Jr. completed his tenure on December 23, 1903, the school had become Brigham Young University, and Cluff was its first President. At the request of President Cluff, the change from Brigham Young Academy to Brigham Young University, and Brigham Young University High School, took place on October 3, 1903. In the same year, the Board accepted the resignation of Cluff, and he was formally released on December 23rd, having served the school in various executive positions since 1882, and as President since 1892. Benjamin Cluff Jr. possessed a lifelong desire to do archeological research to prove the veracity of the Book of Mormon. In 1900 President Cluff had been granted a leave of absence to lead a group of explorers on an expedition to South America. Travel to and from the Mormon colonies in Mexico was commonplace in those days, but Mormon exploration beyond the colonies was rare, and Cluff felt that this was the time to begin. On April 17, 1900, a group of well outfitted men left the Academy campus in Provo, led by a brass band and followed by most of the student body, on a march to Spanish Fork. There a grand reception was held, food was served, final speeches were made, and soon the little group departed to continue its trek to Mexico and South America. The full story of this expedition is full of adventures, successes and disappointments, but should be told elsewhere. President Cluff returned to Provo on February 7, 1902, disappointed and without the archeological evidences that he had sought. However, a naturalist on the expedition, Chester Van Buren, went on to Columbia, South America, and remained in the jungles until 1903, returning with some 1200 birds, snakes, mammals, Indian patterns, etc., to fill a museum on campus. This museum was established by Professor Van Buren, Professor Edwin H. Smart, and a student, George Talmage. For many years College Hall had a very lifelike exhibition of the Amazon jungle. After his retirement from BYU, Cluff pursued a life's ambition to find proof or Book of Mormon evidences, and strata in Native American history. He paid all of his debts, gave homage to his colleagues, and moved his large family to Mexico. From there he established a rubber plantation, from which he hoped to launch additional efforts in ancient history. However, he experienced incredible hardships, placed his confidence in people who did not deserve it, and his plantation failed. He suffered massive losses from theft and deception. He eventually left Mexico for California, where he engaged in the grocery business, and served in the Church as occasion presented itself. One of the last Mormon polygamists, Cluff first married Mary Jane John [a BYA student] on August 16, 1883. He second married Harriet Cullmore on December 17, 1886. He third married Florence Reynolds in Mexico. Benjamin Cluff, Jr., died on June 16, 1948 in California at the age of 90 years. For distinguished service to the University, the Church, and his native state, the BYU Alumni Association conferred upon Cluff the Distinguished Service Award in 1946. The University further honored him by naming a new botanical building the "Benjamin Cluff Jr. Plant Science Laboratory", a nursery for the University's expanded landscaping and beautification program, and for the scientific research of three departments: Agronomy, Botany and Horticulture. The Benjamin Cluff Jr. Annual Lecture was established at BYU in 2003. It was designed to bring the nation’s top educators to the BYU campus to expose students to new ideas, and to foster a growing dialogue about how to make education better, an ongoing legacy of the first president of Brigham Young University.

Cluff, D. F.

Cluff, D. F.
Provo, Utah US

D. F. Cluff

Faculty & Staff. D. F. Cluff (M or F?), Training School, 1899-1900.

Cluff, Nellie

Cluff, Nellie
Provo, Utah US

Nellie Cluff

Faculty & Staff. Nellie Cluff, Training School, 1905-1907.

Cluff, Walter E.

Cluff, Walter E.
Provo, Utah US

Walter Cluff

Faculty & Staff. Walter E. Cluff, Training School, 1902-1909.

Coffman, W. Elmo

Coffman, W. Elmo
Provo, Utah US

Elmo Coffman

Faculty & Staff. W. Elmo Coffman, Science, Geography, Mathematics & Physics, 1932-1933, 1936-1937, 1937-1938, 1938-39.

Colton, Don Byron

Colton, Don Byron
Provo, Utah US

Don and 2 Colton

BY Academy High School Commercial Class of 1895. D. B. Colton. Source: Salt Lake Tribune, May 23, 1895. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Don Byron Colton, Training School, 1900-1902. Bio to come.

Colton, Warren Alfred

Colton, Warren Alfred
Ossining, New York US

Warren and Merle Colton

BY Academy High School Class of 1903, and BYU Class of 1905, Faculty. Warren A. Colton. He received a High School Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 14. ~ ~ ~ ~ Second source confirming high school graduation of W. A. Colton: Deseret News, May 16, 1903. ~ ~ ~ ~ Brigham Young University, Class of 1905. Warren A. Colton. He was elected the first Student Body President of BYU in 1903-1904. When Warren Colton was a BYU junior in the [future] Class of 1905, the new leaders of BYU granted their university students the privilege of organizing the first BYU student body government. This was during the fall of 1903. Warren's class elected him the junior candidate to stand for election as the first president of the BYU Student Body. Warren Colton had the edge because he was a part-time teacher and therefore a member of the BYU faculty. ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Warren A. Colton, Physical Education teacher, 1902-1906. ~ ~ ~ ~ Warren Alfred Colton was born on March 29, 1883 in Ashley [later Vernal], Utah. His parents were Sterling Driggs Colton and Nancy Adeline Wilkins Colton. He married Merle Elizabeth Crandall, of Springville, Utah, on October 25, 1906. Merle was born on March 27, 1883 in Springville, Utah. Her parents were Lucian Delancy Crandall and Elizabeth Cook Crandall. She died on December 13, 1962 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. Dr. Warren A. Colton died on October 8, 1963 in Ossining, Westchester County, New York. His interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1903. Warren A. Colton, Normal & High School Class of 1903 (seniors). Source: Brigham Young Academy & Normal Training School, Catalogue & Announcements, for 27th Academic Year, 1902-1903, Listing of Normal & High School Students, Class of 1903, including Students with 108-144 Hours Credit at the Close of the 1st Semester, 1901-1902, p. 136. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1903. Warren A. Colton of Vernal, Utah, an academic High School student, BYA [& BYH] Class of 1903 Listing of Fourth Year Students (seniors). Source: Brigham Young Academy & Normal Training School, Catalogues & Announcements, for 28th Academic Year, 1903-1904, pp. 171-172.

Coltrin, Elizabeth [Adamson,]

Coltrin, Elizabeth [Adamson,]
Provo, Utah US

Beth & Lynden Adamson

Faculty & Staff. Mrs. Elizabeth Adamson. According to her students at the BYU Laboratory School, she was a wonderful Fourth Grade Teacher. She taught the Fourth Grade in 1967-1968, and if her students had been able to graduate from BYH, they would have been the Centennial class, 1876 to 1976. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Elizabeth Coltrin Adamson, age 78, beloved wife, mother and grandmother, returned to her Heavenly Father, May 26, 1995 due to heart failure after a short stay at the Utah Valley Regional Medical Center, Provo. She was born March 18, 1917 in Burley, Idaho to Ira and Ocea C. Lewis Coltrin. She married Lynden Stanford Adamson, January 22, 1938. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Logan LDS Temple on April 1, 1938. Beth, as she was known to family and friends, grew up in Burley and attended the Burley schools. She received her teaching certificate from Albion Normal College, in Albion, Idaho. Her teaching career began in 1937 at Carey, Idaho. She also taught at the BYU Lab School and Franklin Elementary. Beth received her Bachelor and Master degrees from Idaho State, Pocatello, Idaho and her Doctorate degree in Education in 1972 from the University of Utah. She was offered teaching positions in other schools and other states. She chose to remain in Provo. She taught several of her own children, grandchildren and one son-in-law. She wrote several reading programs. Her materials have been published and used nationally. She has had articles published in church magazines and educational publications, as well as children's books and cross word puzzles. While living in Carey, Idaho, she was a newspaper reporter and photographer for the Hailey Times and Times News. Beth loved to ride horses, reading, gardening, working in the fields during hay harvest, walking, sewing and cross word puzzles. Beth is survived by her husband, of Provo; seven children: Karen Adamson (Bill) Dellos, Orangeville, Utah; Lyn (Patti) Adamson, Provo; June Adamson (Leonard) Beckman, Santaquin; Phillip (Jane) Adamson, American Fork; Jeanne Adamson (Billy) Matherne, Phoenix, Arizona; Joanne Adamson (Gary) Lancaster, Orem; Jim (Nina) Adamson, Vancouver, Washington; 43 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren; brothers and sisters, Ira Coltrin, Burley, Idaho; Lewis Coltrin, Reno, Nevada; Joan Jones, Idaho Falls, Idaho; Merla Bell, Albion, Idaho; Horace Coltrin, Declo, Idaho; Gene Coltrin, Pocatello, Idaho. She was preceded in death by her parents, and one brother, Graham Coltrin. Funeral services were held Tuesday, May 30, 1995 in Provo. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. [Deseret News, May 1995.]

Combs, Isaiah M. Jr. [Coombs,]

Combs, Isaiah M. Jr. [Coombs,]
Provo, Utah US

Isaiah Combs or Coombs

BY Academy High School Class of 1882. Isaiah M. Coombs, Jr. (sometimes Combs). Graduated June 16, 1882. 21 members of the Class of 1882 are mentioned. Source 1: Deseret Evening News, June 19, 1882. Source 2: Territorial Enquirer, June 21, 1882. ~ ~ ~ ~ Mentioned as a continuing Normal student in the 1881 Principal's Report of Karl G. Maeser, The Territorial Enquirer, Provo, Utah June 22, 1881. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Isaiah Combs, Jr., Training School and Drawing teacher, 1883-1884.

Compton, Lane A.

Compton, Lane A.
Provo, Utah US

Lane and June Compton

Faculty & Staff, including 1953-54, 1954-55 and 1955-56. Lane A. Compton. Algebra, Chemistry, Physics. ~ ~ ~ ~ "I was born in Ogden, Utah. I was born on April ll, 1920. I grew up in Ogden. I went on a mission in 1941. I graduated from Weber College before that when it was a junior college. I came back and went to the University of Utah, and got married in 1943. I struggled along and finally got my doctorate in 1955, and after getting most of my graduate work in I came to BYU as a faculty member. I’ve lived in Provo ever since. My father was a politician and so I was very interested in politics. ~ ~ ~ ~ My name is Lane A. Compton. I came to BYU as a teacher both at the High School and at the University, and was in the BY Academy building from 1953 to 1956. When I entered the classroom to meet my first class as a teacher at the school, I was met at the door by two students. One of them asked, "Are you our new chemistry teacher?" I replied, "Yes, I am." The student said, "The last two chemistry teachers lasted only one year each." Then he asked, "How long do you think you'll last?" It didn't take long to be tested. When the bell rang ending the class, all the boys jumped up in unison onto the laboratory desks located underneath the open windows on two sides of the room. They had the obvious intention of exiting through the windows. There wasn't time for me to think -- two more seconds and they would be through the windows, and I would be well on my way to becoming another one-year teacher. I reacted instantly and shouted, "Anybody who goes through that window, will never again come through that door!" It worked. They all got down from the lab desks and went out the door. Fortunately, I was not another one-year teacher, and I learned that they were just a bunch of fun-loving teenagers!
My office was in the basement. It was located next to the main entrance and stairs. Adjacent to my office was an unfinished area complete with spider webs in which I stored a few things. When I first entered the area I looked around in awe. The timbers were not of finished lumber -- they were large unfinished logs, with finished ends that could be bolted or nailed to other logs. The logs were of such large diameter that I thought they would support the entrance and stairs forever. With the remodeling of the building it looks as though those logs are well on their way to 'forever'." By Lane A. Compton, Provo. [Provo Daily Herald, September 7, 2001.] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Lane A. Compton ~ 1920 - 2013. Our precious father, grandfather, and great-grandfather passed away on April 27, 2013. He was known for his optimism, his constant efforts to enrich and bless all his contacts, his unwavering faith in his Savior Jesus Christ, and for his love of his family. He was always a great support to all of his children. He was the 2nd son of George Albert Compton and Margaret Estelle Mattson Compton. His sweetheart, June Wheeler, was his wife of 64 years. He is survived by his children: Janet Compton Hatch; Sandra Compton (Thomas Scott) Glade; Kent Lane (Susie Stringham) Compton; Bruce A. Compton; and Christine Compton (Michael William) Porter, and by sixteen grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. He was born April 11, 1920 in Ogden Utah , and served an LDS mission in New York State and Pennsylvania . He served in the Army as a Medical Specialist during World War II. He married June Wheeler on September 8, 1943. She was the love of his life. He was very active in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints, serving twice as bishop, on the high council, and in numerous other positions. From his youth he always had callings in the church. He worked as a math/chemistry teacher for the Granite School District and at BYU High School. He earned his doctorate at the University of Utah. At BYU he was a physics, chemistry, and math professor, acting Director of Research, and Chairman of Cooperative Education. He was president of the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters and chairman of the Rocky Mountain Science Council. After retiring he volunteered to teach in the elementary schools for nearly a decade. While in his 80's he drove 114 miles twice a week, volunteering more than 80 hours per month. During this time he received the Davis School District Volunteer of the Year award and the Channel 4 TV Pride for Utah Award for his volunteer work. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m., Saturday, May 4, 2013 at the Edgemont 5th Ward Chapel, 350 East 2950 North, Provo, Utah. Friends may call at the Berg Mortuary of Provo, 185 East Center Street , Friday from 6:30-8 p.m. and at the church Saturday from 9-9:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. Condolences may be emailed to info@bergmortuary.com [The Davis Clipper, Tuesday, April 30, 2013] ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: June Wheeler Compton, born February 20, 1922, died March 28, 2007 of complications from a stroke. She was born and lived her early life in Ogden, Utah. There she met and married her beloved husband, Lane A. Compton, in the Salt Lake Temple on September 8, 1943. Their lives were a legacy of love and devotion to each other and to their children. June enjoyed success as a teacher of young women and children in the organizations of the LDS church. She was an accomplished and productive seamstress. Her sewing was praised by professional seamstresses. She lovingly sewed beautiful clothing for her children and grandchildren. Her greatest joy came from serving her family. She loved cooking and entertaining for large family events until the time of her death. She was adored by all of her children and grandchildren. She lived a life of honesty, integrity, and devotion to her Savior. She was active in the LDS Church all her life. June was a woman of dignity and refinement. Her friends describe her as a gracious lady with a quiet, reserved charm. She was a woman of great determination and exercised and walked even in the last month of her life when it was difficult. She is survived by her husband, Lane A. Compton, and her children: Janet Hatch of Bountiful, Utah; Sandra Glade (Tom) of San Antonio, Texas and Wichita, Kansas; Kent Compton (Susie) of Woodland Hills, Utah; Bruce Compton of Provo, Utah; and Christine Porter (Michael) of Alpine, Utah; 16 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. ~ ~ Funeral Services will be held Monday, April 2, 2007 at 1:00 p.m. in the Edgemont 5th Ward Chapel, 350 East 2950 North, Provo. A viewing will be held Sunday, April 1, 2007 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at Berg Mortuary, 185 East Center Street, Provo, and Monday one hour prior to services at the church. Interment will follow at the Provo City Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to info@bergmortuary.com [Provo Daily Herald, March 31, 2007.]

Conder, Vera Hannah

Conder, Vera Hannah
Orem, Utah US

Vera Conder

Faculty & Staff. Vera Conder was a Physical Education teacher during the 1932-1933 school year. ~ ~ ~ ~ Her parents: Claude Carlisle Conder and Hilda Christabell Strong Conder. Their children included: John Carlisle "Jack" Conder, Shirley Conder, Donna Conder Banks, Maxine Conder Waldberg, Julia Mary Conder Edwards, C. Philip Conder, Vera Conder [BYH Faculty, 1932-1933] (Pleasant Grove), and Jean Conder Allen (Salt Lake City). She was preceded in death by her husband, January 28, 1980; and sister, Maxeen Conder Waldburg. @1998 ~ ~ ~ ~ Vera Hannah Conder was born on November 14, 1911 in American Fork, Utah, to Claude Conder and Hilda Strong Conder. Vera Conder died on October 10, 2000 in Orem, Utah.

Cook, Roger
5605 W Lydia Lane
Phoenix, Arizona 85001 US

Roger Cook
  • Work: (602) 237-2813

Faculty & Staff. Roger Cook. Early 1960s, including 1964-1968 - Seminary Teacher.

Cope, George Michael

Cope, George Michael
Richfield, Utah US

George & two/three Cope

BYH Class of 1903. Faculty & Staff. George M. Cope, Shorthand and Spelling teacher, 1900-1905. ~ ~ ~ ~ George Michael Cope was born December 13, 1877 in Panguitch (Spry), Utah. His parents were Thomas Henry Cope and Amelia Jane Lloyd Cope. He first married Geneva Cox on May 29, 1912 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He second married Eunice Allie Wilson on May 6, 1926 in Manti, Utah. Records show a third marriage, which might have been a temple sealing: To Amelia Cox, who was born October 24, 1878 in St. George, Utah and who died on October 2, 1890 at the age of 12. George M. Cope would have been 13 at the time of her death. Perhaps a deceased sister of Amelia Cox. George M. Cope died on October 21, 1926 in Richfield, Utah, of typhoid fever, Dr. T. R. Gledhill attending. Interment, Richfield City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYH Class of 1903. George M. Cope of Tropic, Utah, a Normal student, BYA [& BYH] Class of 1903 Listing of Fourth Year Students (seniors). Source: Brigham Young Academy & Normal Training School, Catalogues & Announcements, for 28th Academic Year, 1903-1904, pp. 171-172.

Court, Thomas Samuel

Court, Thomas Samuel
Provo, Utah US

Thomas & Florence Court

B. Y. Academy High School Graduate, Class of 1901 and 1902, Faculty. Thomas S. Court. In 1901 he also received a Special Certificate in Plane Surveying. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 2, Page 15. ~ ~ ~ ~ B. Y. Academy High School Graduate, Class of 1902. Thomas S. Court. In Spring of 1902 he received a regular High School Diploma. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, Page 75. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Thomas S. Court, Registrar and Deputy Treasurer, 1899 - 1904. ~ ~ ~ ~ Thomas Samuel Court was born March 4, 1871 in West Jordan, Utah. His parents were Owen Thomas Court and Louisa Sarah Swinyard. He married Florence Ella Pratt on November 23, 1898 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had nine sons and three daughters. Thomas S. Court died on September 23, 1957, in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ The children of Thomas Samuel Court [BYA Faculty - Registrar] [1871-1957] and Florence Ella Pratt Court [1881-1974] included nine sons and three daughters: Thomas Otis Court [1899-1963], of Spokane, Washington; Ralph Pratt Court [1901-1980], of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Byron Owen Court [1903-1996] (married Bertha Ann Brown), of Provo; Lowell J. Court [1905-1987], of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Ward Louvi Court [1909-1983], of San Pedro, California; Urban Delos Court [1912-1936] of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Lamar Samuel (Pearl) Court [1914-1997]; Annabelle Court [1918-1918], Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada; Elmo Richard Court [1919-1991], of Provo, Utah; Florence Court (Leland) Shields [1916-2001]; Ruth Court [BYH Class of 1940] (Nephi) Quist [born abt. 1922]; and Robert (Janiel) Court [BYH Class of 1944] [born abt. 1926].

Cox, Euphrasia

Cox, Euphrasia
Provo, Utah US

Euphrasia Miner

BY Academy High School Class of 1882. Euphrasia Cox. Graduated June 16, 1882. 21 members of the Class of 1882 are mentioned. Source 1: Deseret Evening News, June 19, 1882. Source 2: Territorial Enquirer, June 21, 1882. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff, Training School, 1881-1884. Married _____ Miner.

Craig, Anna K.

Craig, Anna K.
Provo, Utah US

Anna Craig

Faculty & Staff. Anna K. Craig, Training School, 1893-1898.

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