Class of 1891 H.S.


Alphabetical Alumni
411, BYA Orphan Class

411, BYA Orphan Class
Class Roster Missing

BYA Orphan Class 411

BY Academy Orphan Classes.

Out of 105 classes tracked by this website Directory, we have not yet found relatively complete class listings for only the following classes: 1880, 1890, 1891 Commercials, 1892, 1898, 1899, and 1900. We welcome researchers to find newspaper reports, photographs, listings in biographies, and other innovative sources for these class lists. To volunteer, please email yhigh@ymail.com

411, Class of 1891

411, Class of 1891

Class of 1891 411

Class of 1891.

As of May 2008, twenty-one BYA Normal high school graduates have been added to the following Class of 1891, based on copy of their graduation program. The Commercial high school graduates have still to be found and added. For a photograph of known 1891 graduates, visit here. Special thanks to Scott Cowley.

Alleman, Ida Ann

Alleman, Ida Ann
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Ida and George Taylor

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, Collegiate Normal Class of 1893. Ida Alleman. Received a High School Normal Diploma, on May 21, 1891. She served as Historian for her class. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. She received a Collegiate Normal Diploma, Bachelor of Pedagogy (B.Pd.) in 1893. Source: Students Record of Class Standings, BY Academy, Book 1, page 1. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Ida Alleman, Training School, 1908-1909. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ida Ann Alleman was born on March 18, 1872 in Springville, Utah. Her parents were John Henry Alleman and Zebina Starr Alleman. Ida Ann married George Shephard Taylor on June 28, 1911 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Ida Ann Alleman died on June 16, 1965 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah.

Andelin, Olof Wilhelm

Andelin, Olof Wilhelm
Provo, Utah US

O. W. and Mary Andelin

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, BYA Collegiate Normal Class of 1893. Olof W. Andelin. Received a High School Normal Diploma, on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. O. W. Andelin received a Normal Bachelor of Pedagogy (B.Pd.) degree in 1893. Source: Students Record of Class Standings, BY Academy, Book 1, page 1. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. O. W. Andelin, Teacher of Foreign Languages, 1893-1912. Andelin appears in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Principal Benjamin Cluff in 1892. ~ ~ ~ ~ Olof Wilhelm Andelin was born on January 28, 1867 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Olof Anderson Andelin and Oliva Maria Lofdahl. He taught French and German at BYA in the early 1900's. In 1908-09 his annual salary was $1,127. He and many other faculty members engaged in "extracurricular farming" to make ends meet. He served as a Sunday School Superintendent. He married Mary Elizabeth Turner on October 10, 1888 in Manti, Utah. Mary was born on March 24, 1866 in Fillmore, Utah. Her parents were Thomas Turner and Mary Elizabeth Davis [or Davies]. Mary Turner Andelin died on June 21, 1946 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Provo, Utah. O. W. Andelin died on January 14, 1946 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah. Several Andelin children attended BYH, including Aubrey Olof Andelin, BYH Class of 1910; Marian Andelin (female), BYH Class of 1912; L'Etrenne Andelin (male), BYH Class of 1922 [born 1901]; [Thomas] Delece Andelin (male), also BYH Class of 1922 [born 1903].

Bevan, Archie

Bevan, Archie

Archie Bevan

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Archie Bevan. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Bullock, Ettie

Bullock, Ettie

Ettie Bullock

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Ettie Bullock. Note: Her name is inked in on the graduation program, as if her name had been inadvertently left off. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: BYU Special Collections copy of the Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Clark, Hannah T.

Clark, Hannah T.
St. George, Utah US

Hannah and Walter Pike

BY Academy High School Class of 1891? Hannah Clark. Although she is not listed with the graduates of the Class of 1891, she is listed as a member of the Graduation Committee in the 1891 BYA graduation program, and she was not listed with the Juniors. It is likely she was a high school music graduate in 1891 -- need more research. ~ ~ ~ ~ Hannah T. Clark was born on October 19, 1873 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Joseph Clark and Frances Carter Clark. Hannah married Dr. Walter Randal [or Randall] Pike, after Dr. Pike's first wife died. Hannah C. Pike died on April 2, 1947 in Los Angeles, California. Her interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1878 when Provo's population hovered near 3,000, the city provided a living for nine doctors. At least one of those doctors, Walter Randal Pike, had traveled the world and led a fascinating life. Pike, born in 1848, emigrated to America from England. As a very young man he spent some time at sea, then came to the United States at age 16. After traveling the American West for three years, young Walter settled in Salt Lake City, where he began the study of medicine at 19. He finished his course of study in two years and entered the drug store business, working for the ZCMI pharmacy. During his five years as a druggist, Pike gained a thorough knowledge of drugs and medicine. The young druggist traveled east in 1876 and attended Burlington Medical School in Vermont. He graduated from a one-year course and moved to New York City where he received another medical degree in 1878. Pike returned to the West and partnered with Dr. Joseph Benedict in Salt Lake City. Pike then moved to Provo where he began his own practice. While living in the latter city, he became a U.S. citizen in 1881. Provo hired Pike as the city's quarantine physician in 1878. He held that job until 1885, even though he moved back to Salt Lake City briefly and practiced medicine there during part of 1884 and 1885. According to the Deseret News, when Pike moved back to Utah's capital city for a brief time, the people welcomed the "more than ordinarily successful" doctor. He had, by this early time, earned a very good reputation in his career. The paper called him "one of the ablest and most popular physicians in Utah." In May 1884, Dr. Pike (who was by this time married) decided to move back to Provo. But Mrs. Pike was suffering from nervous prostration, and this delayed the move several weeks. In the early 1880s, Utah's Legislature voted to establish a territorial insane asylum and chose Provo as the site for the institution. The hospital's board of directors selected Dr. Pike as the asylum's first medical superintendent in 1884. The doctor resigned as Provo's quarantine physician and accepted the new job, which came with an annual salary of $1,500. Pike and Judge Warren Dusenberry left Provo in early January 1885 on a tour of several asylums in the East. They hoped to return with useful ideas on how to run Utah's new mental hospital. The asylum opened later in 1885. After accepting the prestigious position of medical superintendent of the territorial asylum, Pike began construction of a large two-story home befitting his lofty position. The house was built on the west side of Academy (University) Avenue on 400 South. In addition to his job as director of the asylum, Pike kept up his private practice. In the spring of 1886, he entered into a partnership with Dr. Hardy. The two had their office above Smoot Drugstore on west Center Street near Academy Ave. Tragedy struck the doctor's household in October 1892 when Mrs. Pike died. She had made a large circle of friends in Provo despite her chronic ill health, and her funeral at the Provo Tabernacle was well attended. Dr. Pike immersed himself in his occupation and delved into new activities. He campaigned for a seat in the territorial Legislature in 1892 and won. While serving in the Legislature, he introduced several bills regulating the medical and pharmacological professions. Because of his work in this area, he became known as Utah's father of medicine and pharmacy. After about a year spent in mourning, Dr. Pike developed a new love interest, Miss Hannah Clark, a native of Provo who was 23 years his junior. Hannah had graduated from Brigham Young Academy and was busy teaching music and drama. The two hoped to carry on a quiet courtship, and they succeeded until the evening of Dec. 13, 1893. On that date, Dr. Pike drove his buggy to Miss Clark's west-side home and picked her up. The two then drove to John Lewis's livery stable on the west side of 100 West between Center Street and 100 North. They left the vehicle and the horse in the care of Mr. Lewis and walked to the 4th Ward church, then located on the north side of 200 North between Academy Avenue and 100 East. Once inside, the couple joined a surprise party for Professor Giles, an instructor at Brigham Young Academy. They left the hall about midnight. Unfortunately, that was the hour when Provo's streetlights were turned off. The absence of artificial lights combined with low-lying clouds made the night as dark as "a stack of black cats," according to the Deseret News. The darkness was so intense that the two pedestrians found it difficult to locate the livery stable, a mere two blocks away. It might have been romantic if a furious gale had not been blowing. Dr. Pike and Miss Clark arrived at the livery stable and climbed into the waiting buggy. Since Center Street was so badly rutted at that time of the year, and since Hannah lived four blocks west on 100 North, Pike choose 100 North as the route to Hannah's home. The street lights had been turned off for the night, so the traveled portion of the road was almost impossible to see. Dr. Pike drove slowly, holding a line in each hand. Miss Clark held firmly to his right arm as he leaned forward, intently trying to discern any sign of wagon tracks. Unbeknownst to poor Pike and his feminine companion, the buggy traveled a somewhat serpentine course and left the road, gradually veering a few feet northward. The doctor trusted his horse to find the narrow bridge across the millrace on 200 West. Unfortunately, the horse's sight proved to be no better than its driver's. By the time the buggy reached the stream, the vehicle was six feet north of the bridge. The horse stepped off a five-foot, stone embankment, plunging the buggy and its occupants into Provo's millrace, filled with three-and-a-half feet of fast-moving chilly water. Luckily, both passengers fell mostly free of the buggy. After extricating himself, Pike began a frenzied search for Miss Clark, who was submerged in the darkness. The doctor felt her coat collar, grasped it tightly, and pulled her head above water. Hannah was known as a songstress with a powerful voice. Her robust voice attracted the attention of sleepers blocks away, as well as the night watchman patrolling Center Street. A crowd assembled near the bridge in minutes. Neighbors helped Hannah to a nearby house. Although she had suffered a severe nervous shock, Dr. Pike, who was most solicitous of his companion's health, found her physically uninjured. Rescuers conveyed Miss Clark, suffering from shock and a few bruises, to her home three blocks away. They took the shaken Dr. Pike, who received a scratch on his hand and bruises on his side, to the asylum, where he soon came down with a severe cold. It appears Pike's involuntary baptism neither cooled his ardor for Miss Clark nor gave him cold feet. Three weeks after the couple scampered from Provo's frigid millrace, they calmly walked together into the placid waters of matrimony. On Jan. 2, 1894, Mayor Dusenberry performed the ceremony at the Clark residence. The bride wore a cream satin dress decorated with white roses. According to the Salt Lake Herald, a "dainty supper was served" at 6 o'clock. The paper also observed: "The event was something of a surprise to many of Dr. Pike's friends, but they are all pleased." After the accident, Pike did not spend many more years in Provo. In 1896, the asylum board offered to renew his contract for $2,000 per year. Pike demanded $2,500, and the board balked. The doctor tendered his resignation, effective in six months. Pike moved his private practice to his home, but he did not work full time. In 1898, Pike toured large hospitals in the East and in Europe. He called on relatives in New York and visited his old home in England. After returning from Europe, Pike took a three-month, post-graduate course in New York City. Rheumatism and asthma forced Pike to leave Provo in 1900, and his stately home became the Crane Maternity Hospital. The doctor and his wife moved to St. George, where he gradually retired from medicine because of declining health. The couple built the St. George Drug Company and managed it until the doctor's death June 10, 1921. Pike's funeral was held in the Provo Tabernacle and he was buried in the Provo City Cemetery. The Washington County News described Pike as "a courtly gentleman, kindly in his disposition and ever willing to serve. His activities were limited owing to his physical condition, but he could always be depended upon to do his part in all public improvements." [Thanks to D. Robert Carter - Provo Daily Herald, Sunday, July 08, 2007.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Walter R. Pike was born on June 8, 1948, in Norwich, Norfolk, England. His parents were Peter Newman Pike and Mary Hendrie Randal [or Randall] Pike. He became a medical doctor, and was a veteran of the Utah Black Hawk War. Dr. Pike died on June 10, 1921 in St. George, Utah. His interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah.

Groesbeck, Cornelia E. [Cora - not Ira]

Groesbeck, Cornelia E. [Cora - not Ira]
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Cora and Clarence Snow

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1890 and 1891, and Collegiate Normal Class of 1893. Cora Groesbeck, Normal diploma, Source: Utah Enquirer, May 23, 1890. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891 Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source 1: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Cora [not Ira] Groesbeck, received a Normal Diploma, Bachelor of Pedagogy (B.Pd.), in 1893. Source: Students Record of Class Standings, BY Academy, Book 1, page 7. ~ ~ ~ ~ Cornelia Evangeline (Cora) Groesbeck was born on July 18, 1873 in Springville Utah. Her parents: Nicholas Harmon Groesbeck and Cornelia Melissa Sanford Groesbeck. She married Clarence Snow of Springville, Utah, on September 5, 1900. She died on November 12, 1964 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY OF HER SON: Eliot Snow, distinguished physician and surgeon, died peacefully October 11, 1995 in his home in Salt Lake City. He was 92. Dr. Snow was born in 1902 to Clarence and Cornelia Groesbeck Snow in Logan, Utah. Clarence Snow was the youngest of 10 children born to Mormon pioneers Erastus Snow and his 3rd wife, Elizabeth Ashby Snow. Erastus Snow and Orson Pratt were the first Mormons to enter the Salt Lake Valley. Dr. Snow graduated with an A.B. from the University of Utah in 1924 and with an M.D. degree from Harvard Medical School in 1928. He interned at the Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia from 1928 to 1930. From 1930 to 1932 he served a fellowship in surgery at the Lahey Clinic in Boston, Massachusetts where he was first assistant to the eminent surgeon Dr. Frank H. Lahey. He married Marjorie Eleanora Greacen in 1932. He then returned to Salt Lake as surgeon to the Salt Lake Clinic, where he was active in its growth until his retirement in 1972. He spent four years in the Medical Corps of the Army of the United States during World War II. From 1950 to 1971, during the Korean and Vietnam wars, he was chairman of the Utah Committee for the "Drafting of Doctors, Dentists, and Allied Specialists" for which service he was awarded the Silver Medal of the Selective Service. In 1933 he was instrumental in founding the Salt Lake Surgical Club which in 1937 became the Salt Lake Surgical Society. From 1963 to 1972 he was the governor of the American College of Surgeons for Utah. He started, and was chairman for seven years, of the college's committee for the study of malpractice and liability. His wife, Marjorie Greacen Snow, preceded him in death on April 1, 1989 at the age of 85. He is survived by two sons, Geoffrey Snow, of Colorado; and Rick Snow, of California; by three grandchildren; and by his sister, Dr. Dorothy Snow; and brother, Dr. Robert Snow. [Deseret News, Wednesday, October 25, 1995.]

Hart, E. S.

Hart, E. S.

E. S. Hart

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. E. S. Hart. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Hinckley, Edwin Smith

Hinckley, Edwin Smith
Provo, Utah US

Edwin and Addie Hinckley

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, and Collegiate Class of 1897. Faculty. Edwin Smith Hinckley. Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. He was named Class Orator, and spoke in the Commencement Exercises. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Edwin S. Hinckley. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ B. Y. Academy Class of 1900. S. E. (sic) Hinckley. In 1897 at Commencement Exercises, S. E. Hinckley was called upon to deliver a short speech, since he was the president of the Class of 1900 (freshmen) at that time. [Of course, someone else may have been elected president in the following years.] Source: (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 24, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Geology and Education teacher, 1895-1915. Sixth Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. ~ ~ ~ ~ Edwin S. Hinckley was born July 21, 1868, in Cove Fort, Utah, the seventh child of pioneer parents, Ira N. and Adelaide Hinckley. They were known as people of refinement, integrity, religion, family, and education. Edwin S. Hinckley attended Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah, and his experiences heightened his interest in higher education. Bryant graduated from BYA high school in 1885 and Edwin in 1886? Edwin was a half brother to Bryant S. Hinckley, and they came to Provo to school together. Edwin married Addie Henry in 1890, and Bryant went on to school in the East and was not married until three years later. Each man remained a teacher and both taught at BYA, Bryant from 1893 to 1900, and Edwin for twenty years. Edwin and his wife Adeline (Addie) Henry Hinckley moved to Ann Arbor, Mich., to pursue additional studies in geology at the University of Michigan; he graduated as class salutatorian. Simultaneously he served a part-time mission. Returning to BYA to teach in 1895, Hinckley served another mission in Colorado. After Brigham Young Academy became BYU in 1903, Hinckley served as Principal of BY High School from 1904 to 1909. For 21 years he inspired students in the classroom, prompting at least one of them, J. Edward Johnson, to write that he "sat as one enchanted all the period he talked to our class, later adding, "One of [his] expressions was, 'Some of you here have it in you to do things which will set waves in motion that will not stop until they break upon the waves of eternity.' "What he taught me in geology has long since ceased to make the slightest difference to me, but the inspiration of his personality and philosophy of life . . . his keen wit and wholesome good humor, continue to fire me with new ambitions." Hinckley, known as the geologist of the university, also served as second counselor, as it was termed then, to BYU president George H. Brimhall. With E.D. Partridge, he laid out the block Y, and was dean of the Church Teachers College. Upon his BYU retirement he served the State Industrial School at Ogden for seven years as superintendent where his management philosophy was "Trust-not punish." He later served as executive director for the Provo City Chamber of Commerce and was a principal participant in major economic development in central Utah. He had served as BYU's Alumni president in 1897 and '98 and continued his affiliation in 1924 and '25 as president a second time. Hinckley died Nov. 15, 1929, leaving a family that included 13 children. In 1954, wanting to express appreciation to their parents, they extended the Hinckley influence by establishing the Edwin Smith Hinckley Scholarship Fund at BYU.

Jameson, Alexander

Jameson, Alexander

Alex Jameson

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Alex. Jameson. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections, UA 1008.

Lewis, Maggie

Lewis, Maggie

Maggie Lewis

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Maggie Lewis. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Lund, Anthon H.

Lund, Anthon H.
Provo, Utah US

Anthon Lund

Class of 1891? Faculty & Staff. Anton C. Lund, Music and German teacher, 1895-1917. Anthon Hendrik Lund was born May 15, 1844 at Aalborg, Jutland Amt., Denmark to Hendrik Lund and Anne C. Andersen. He came to America as a convert to the Church. After graduating from Brigham Young Academy in 1891, Anthon H. Lund went on to study at the Royal Conservatory in Leipzig. In 1896 when Professor Henry Giles left the Academy to take a position as music supervisor for the Provo public schools, Giles was replaced by Lund, who was to guide the music department for the next 20 years. Almost immediately upon taking over the helm of the music department, Lund set about making improvements based on the conservatory model he had experienced in Germany. Among his other callings, he served on the Young Men general board, as a mission president, and as president of the Genealogical Society of Utah. He was ordained an Apostle on October 7, 1889 by George Q. Cannon and sustained to the Quorum of the Twelve at that time. President Joseph F.Smith called him to serve as Second Counselor in the First Presidency, which position he held until on April 7, 1910, he was sustained as First Counselor. He fulfilled that calling until President Smith's death. November 19, 1918. Heber J. Grant re-called him as First Counselor on November 23 of the same year and on the same day he was sustained as President of the Quorum of the Twelve. He was married first to Sarah Ann Peterson. He practiced plural marriage and had nine children of record. Anthon H. Lund died March 2, 1921 at Salt Lake City, Utah at the age of seventy-seven.

Lund, Anthony Canute (1891)

Lund, Anthony Canute (1891)
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Anthony & Cornelia Lund

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. A. C. Lund [Anthony -- not Anton] received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. A. C. Lund. He was the Valedictorian of his class. He received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Anthony Canute Lund ( – June 11, 1935) served as the director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in Salt Lake City, Utah from 1916 until 1935. Lund was also a professor of music at Brigham Young Academy and then in 1903 at Brigham Young University. Lund was the son of Swedish immigrant Anthon H. Lund in Ephraim, Utah Territory, and his mother was Sarah Ann Peterson Lund. Anthony C. Lund was born on February 25, 1871. At 18 he was made choir director in Ephraim. In 1889 he graduated from Brigham Young Academy high school, and in 1891 he graduated from Brigham Young Academy as a teacher. He then studied at the Royal Conservatory in Leipzig. He also did studies in London and Paris. His departure from Brigham Young University to direct the Tabernacle Choir was viewed as a loss to BYU. Anthony C. Lund married Cornelia Sorenson. In 1897, Lund became head of what was then the Brigham Young Academy Music Department. Under his direction it was changed from being a department to being a school of music in 1901. He helped recruit Professor Albert Miller to teach and direct the brass band and Academy Orchestra. He continued as head of the Music Department after the school became Brigham Young University. He also was on the faculty of the Utah Conservatory and the McCune School of Music. Lund implemented a European choral sound in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir as its director. While Lund was director, the choir made its first electrical recordings on the Victor Label.

Lyman, Mary C.

Lyman, Mary C.
Provo, Utah US

Mary Lyman

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Mary Lyman. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. At Commencement Exercises she served as Foreteller of the Future. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Mary C. Lyman, Training School, 1891-1893.

Lyman, Richard Roswell

Lyman, Richard Roswell
Provo, Utah US

Richard and Amy Lyman

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. Richard R. Lyman received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Normal Class of 1891. Richard Roswell Lyman. He served as President of the High School Normal Senior Class of 1891. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Richard R. Lyman, BYA Mathematics and Physics teacher, 1895-1896. Richard Roswell Lyman was a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles. He was born Nov. 23, 1870, at Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, the son of Francis M. Lyman and Clara Caroline Callister. His father was president of the Council of the Twelve for thirteen years and a member of that Council thirty-six years. Amasa M. Lyman, the grandfather of Richard R. Lyman, was a member of the Council of the Twelve for twenty-eight years. On his mother's side, Richard R. Lyman belonged to the fifth generation of members of the Church. His great grandfather, John Smith, the Prophet's uncle, was one of the presiding Patriarchs of the Church. The mother of this Patriarch also belonged to the Church. Richard R. Lyman's grandmother, on his mother's side, was Caroline Smith Callister, the only sister of the late George A. Smith, who was a counselor to President Brigham Young. In April, 1878, at the age of seven years, he moved with his father's family to Tooele, Tooele County, Utah, where his father had been called to preside over the Tooele Stake of Zion. Richard R. Lyman was baptized July 29, 1879, and soon afterwards ordained a Deacon. At the age of eight (in the summer of 1879), Richard R. was placed in charge of his father's fine driving team and Concord buggy. While he was not big enough to hitch the team to the buggy, the team being unusually full of life, he took pride, under his father's direction and encouragement, in keeping the horses, harness, buggy and barn in clean and first class condition. In 1881-1882 he drove team for both his father and President Heber J. Grant, who had succeeded his father as president of the Tooele Stake. It always afforded the boy great joy to meet President Grant at the Tooele station or at Lake Point with his fine team, and he never forgot with what relish he ate candy and raisins with President Grant, as they rode together from the station or went about Tooele County on Stake business. In the fall of 1882, at the age of twelve, Richard R. was sent to Provo to attend school in the Brigham Young Academy. He was a student in that institution when the fire occurred which made it necessary to move the educational institution into another part of the city. Richard R. spent two summers working at the "Mill" located near E T City, on the shore of Great Salt Lake. Here he milked many cows, assisted in hauling logs for lumber, out of the mountains, etc. For two years Richard R. worked at the ranch of Hyrum E. Booth, near Grantsville, and he regarded the training given him and hard work he was required to do by Hyrum E. Booth and his industrious wife and family as one of the most valuable trainings that came into his life. An expert gardener from England pruned the trees, planted and cared for the garden and did the irrigating on the two homes belonging to Francis M. Lyman in Tooele. When this work was turned over later to Richard R. as a boy, he followed the example set for him by the English gardener. In August, 1888, with his sister Mary, he went to the Brigham Young Academy at Provo to study. At that time this educational institution was under the able leadership of Karl G. Maeser. Richard R. was ordained a Teacher by Bishop Thos. Atkin, Jr., Sept. 16, 1888. While attending school in Provo, Richard R. began a courtship with Miss Amy Brown, which covered continuously a period of eight years. To this girl, whom he married Sept. 9, 1896 (President Joseph F. Smith performing the ceremony), Richard R. always regarded himself as greatly indebted for whatever degree of success came to him in the business world, in the educational field or in Church work. After a summer of hard work at Grantsville, Richard R. and his sister Mary were sent by their father to the Brigham Young College at Logan, which institution then was under the direction of Dr. Joseph M. Tanner. During this school year (1889-1890), Richard R. began his labors as an assistant teacher in the college. While in Logan he took out special certificates in plane and solid geometry, algebra and physiology. The following year, in Provo, his studies covered trigonometry, analytic geometry, theory of teaching, psychology, logic, surveying, physics and rhetoric. During the summer of 1890, Richard R. was employed as a bookkeeper in the combined jewelry and furniture store of T. B. Cardon & Co. at Logan, and during the summer of 1891 he was bookkeeper for the Utah Manufacturing & Building Co. at Mill Creek, near Salt Lake City. Thus far during his school life Richard R. had been required to furnish his own clothing, his own books and his own spending money, while his father had paid his tuition and board. When Richard R. now asked his father for an opportunity to go East to college, the father offered to lend him the necessary means for a period of four years, an offer which the son promptly accepted. Repaying this money and the interest on it at the rate of 10 per cent, required a period of seven years, the principal amounting to nearly $2500. Richard R. was ordained an Elder, Aug. 29, 1891, by Joseph F. Smith and after he went East to study. While he attended the University at Ann Arbor, primarily for the purpose of studying mathematics with the thought of teaching in the Brigham Young University at Provo, and while he registered in the department of civil engineering, he devoted a great deal of time to the study of literature, history and public speaking. During his sophomore year he was elected president of his class and was elected to the same position a second time during his senior year. Richard R. spent all his vacations in hard work; one was devoted to the study of chemistry at the University at Michigan, while two were devoted to traveling through the State selling school supplies for a business firm at Chicago, and one was spent as assistant mine and railroad surveyor in the Tintic mining district, Utah. The school year 1895-1896 was spent in the Brigham Young University as principal of the High School and head of the department of mathematics and physics. Beginning in the fall or 1896 and continuing until the spring of 1918, Richard R. Lyman, in the University of Utah, passed through all the grades of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor and full professor in charge of the department of civil engineering. He held a full professorship and was head of the department for eighteen years. With his family Professor Lyman spent the summer of 1902 doing advanced work in the University of Chicago; thence he went to Cornell University where he was given a residence credit of three years. While there, with the class of 1903, he was graduated with the degree of M. C. E. (Master of Civil Engineering). In the spring of 1904 he was elected by the faculty of Cornell University to membership in the society of The Sigma Xi, a scientific organization into which only those who have achieved marked success and have unusual ability in the line of scientific investigation and research are supposed to be received. With the class of 1905 he was graduated with the degree of Ph. D. (Doctor of Philosophy). In one year he was awarded the only scholarship offered by the college of civil engineering and during another the only fellowship offered by that same department. From 1909 to 1918 he served as vice-chairman of the Utah State Road Commission. During this nine years of service the work of the State Road Commission, from a beginning with little funds, so advanced that at the expiration of this time the State Road Commission was expending in the neighborhood of three-fourths to a million dollars annually. The Utah State Road Commission was created in 1909 and Richard R. Lyman was one of its original members and its first vice-chairman, which position he held during the whole nine years. He served as city engineer of Provo, was transitman on a railroad survey from Springville through Hobble Creek Canyon toward the Uintah reservation for Jesse Knight in 1898, and designed and superintended the construction of waterwork systems in nearly all the towns and smaller cities of Utah and many in Idaho and Wyoming. For years he conducted an office as a civil and consulting engineer. At various times he served as chief engineer and consulting engineer for the following companies: Melville Irrigation Company, Delta, Utah; Deseret Irrigation Company, Oasis, Utah; Oasis Land & Irrigation Company, with headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah; Delta Land & Water Company of Salt Lake City, Utah; Utah County Light & Power Company, American Fork, Utah, and Utah Copper Company of Salt Lake City. He was one of the original directors of the Intermountain Life Insurance Company and is at present serving as vice-president of this company. He was also president of the Giant Racer Company, vice-president of the Ensign Amusement Company, director of the Pleasant Green Water Company, president of the Lyman-Callister Company, and director of Heber J. Grant & Co. Bro. Lyman had experience in the Brigham Young University as a Priest, administering the Sacrament and doing other similar service. From the fall of 1895 to the summer of 1896 he acted as a counselor to Bryant S. Hinckley, superintendent of the Mutual Improvement Associations of the Utah Stake, when the Utah Stake embraced all of Utah county. In 1897 (Sept. 12th), he was ordained a High Priest by President Angus M. Cannon and set apart as superintendent of the YMMIA of Salt Lake Stake, which Stake then included the whole of Salt Lake County. He continued to serve in this capacity until the spring of 1902, when he, with his family, went to the University of Chicago, and later to Cornell University. For several years Bro. Lyman acted as supervisor of the parents' classes of the Ensign Stake. He was ordained an Apostle and set apart as a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles by President Joseph F. Smith April 7, 1918, in the Salt Lake Temple, assisted by Presidents Anthon H. Lund and Charles W. Penrose and the members of the Council of the Twelve. Richard R. Lyman and his wife, Amy B. Lyman, had two children, namely, Wendell Brown Lyman, born Dec. 18, 1897, in Salt Lake City, and Margaret Lyman, born Sept. 15, 1903, at Ithaca, New York. Despite the greatness of his intellect, his spiritual achievements and a distinguished ancestry, Elder Lyman fell into transgression and was excommunicated November 12, 1943. It is not the policy of the Church to publicize the reasons for disciplinary action, but it was the result of a personal transgression and not apostasy. Richard R. Lyman was rebaptized into the Church October 27, 1954. He died December 31, 1963 at Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1941, Richard R. Lyman started the Emeritus Club of the BYU Alumni Association, and he was elected its first president. About 150 "oldtimers" gathered for the first Alumni Emeritus Banquet during commencement week of 1941. Diantha Billings Worsley, Emma Stubbs Taylor, Alice Smoot Newell, Mary E. Cluff Little (?), Charles Albert Glazier, and Samuel D. Moore, members of Brigham Young Academy's first little class in 1876, attended the banquet.

Magleby, Jacob (1891)

Magleby, Jacob (1891)
Idaho Falls, Idaho US

Jacob and Mary Magleby

Brigham Young Academy High School Class of 1891. Jacob Magleby. Jacob Magleby appears in a photograph held by the BYU Archives purporting to be "the first class to graduate from the new Academy Building, 1892." (UAP 2 Folder 037) However, it appears to be a photo of the Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ Richfield High School in Utah was formed in September of 1897. The first RHS teachers were David Nelson and H. N. Hayes, one full-time and one part-time teacher. The enrollment that first year was between twenty and thirty students. At that time there were sixteen school districts in Sevier county, all of which were overseen by County Superintendent Jacob Magleby [BYH Class of 1891]. It wasn’t until 1912 that the sixteen individual districts in the county were consolidated into one, the Sevier County School District. ~ ~ ~ ~ Jacob Magleby was born January 15, 1867 in Milton, Morgan County, Utah. His parents were Hans Olsen Magleby and Elisa Marthine Svendsen Magleby. Jacob graduated from Brigham Young Academy in 1891. Jacob Magleby married Mary Elizabeth Anderson, BYA High School Class of 1891, on September 9, 1896 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was born on October 24, 1867 in Deseret, Millard County, Utah. Her parents were Hakan Andersson and Mariane Marie Nielsen. She died on March 5, 1949 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Jacob Magleby was both an educational leader [elected County Superintendent, and High School Principal] and a banker. They lived for years in Monroe, Utah, then moved to Idaho. He was engaged in farming, feeding and breeding purebred cattle in Sunnydell, Idaho. He was repeatedly elected to the Idaho Legislature. Jacob Magleby died on March 18, 1946 in Idaho Falls, Idaho. His interment, Idaho Falls, Idaho.

McKendrick, Wilford McGavin

McKendrick, Wilford McGavin
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Wilford and Lydia McKendrick

BY Academy High School Class of 1889 and 1891, and BYA Collegiate Class of 1894 and 1897. Faculty. Wilford McGavin McKendrick. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1889, Wilford McKendrick received a high school Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. W. M. McKendrick. Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford McKendrick. BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1894. He received the degree, Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) on May 24, 1894. Source 1: Ogden Standard Examiner, May 26, 1894. Source 2: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 12. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Wilford M. McKendrick. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Wilford M. McKendrick, Librarian, Mathematics & Geography, 1885-1899. He appears in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Principal Benjamin Cluff in 1892. Among other positions McKendrick served as the librarian at Brigham Young Academy. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford was born on June 12, 1870 in Tooele, Utah. His parents were Robert Kennedy McKendrick, and Agnes McGavin McKendrick. Wilford married Lydia Wilson. They had eight children. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford McGavin McKendrick served as principal of Weber Stake Academy, the predecessor of Weber State University from 1908-1910. McKendrick had been a faculty member at Weber Academy before he became the principal, filling the vacancy left by David O. McKay when he resigned to serve as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve. Among other Church positions, he served as a counselor in the Ogden Stake presidency. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford M. McKendrick died on Monday, May 11, 1936 at the age of 66 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Murdock, A. N.

Murdock, A. N.

A. N. Murdock

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. A. N. Murdock. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Peterson, Henry

Peterson, Henry

Henry Peterson

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891, and BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1894. Henry Peterson. ~ ~ ~ ~ Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Henry Peterson received his collegiate degree, Bachelor of Pedagogy (B.Pd.) from BYA on May 24, 1894. Source 1: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, Page 27. Source 2: Ogden Standard Examiner, May 26, 1894. ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? Henry Peterson, born May 9, 1868 in Huntsville, Utah, to father Hans Jorgen Peterson and mother Else Eliason Peterson. He married Mary Jane Boyden on May 29, 1895 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Henry died on June 18, 1957. His interment, Logan, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ OR IS THIS? Henry J. Peterson, born January 21, 1866 in Lund, Sweden. His parents: Nels Johnson and Maria C. Koerner (sic). He died on December 6, 1938 in California. His interment, Brigham City Cemetery, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ OR IS THIS? Henry Hugo Petersen, born about 1873 in Manti, Utah. His parents were Hans Henry Petersen and Julia Marie Larsen Petersen. He married twice: first, to Emily Caroline Anderson on July 1, 1893 in Storden, Cottonwood County, Minnesota. He second married Caroline Marie Christensen on January 29, 1896 in Logan, Utah. He died on September 14, 1943 in Hyrum, Utah. His interment, Hyrum, Cache County, Utah. OR SOMEONE ELSE?

Powelson, Janet [Jenetta] [Nettie]

Powelson, Janet [Jenetta] [Nettie]
Raymond, Alberta, Canada CA

Nettie and Arthur Dahl (Dall)

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Nettie Powelson. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. She served as Secretary of her class. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Janet (Jenetta) (Nettie) Powelson was born on July 29, 1870 in Goshen, Utah. Her parents: Powel Madsen and Janet Gourley. She married Arthur Sanders Dahl or Dall, on August 31, 1892 in Manti, Utah. She died on June 16, 1924 in Raymond, Alberta, Canada. Interment, Raymond, Alberta, Canada.

Ramsey, George J.

Ramsey, George J.

George Ramsey

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. George J. Ramsey. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.

Swensen, Eliza Johanne [Swenson,]

Swensen, Eliza Johanne [Swenson,]

Eliza Swensen

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Eliza Swenson (Swensen). Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Eliza Johanne Swensen was born July 7, 1871 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Her parents were Knud (Canute) Svendsen and Johanne Maire Pedersen. Eliza died on September 17, 1931. ~ ~ ~ ~ Her parents were: Father: Knud (Canute) Svendsen, born April 11, 1827 in Veibye, Hjorring, Denmark, died on March 14, 1902 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Mother: Johanne Maire Pedersen, born September 13, 1833 in Sevenolstrup, Viborg, Denmark, died on May 7, 1880 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They married on June 24, 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They had eight children: ~ ~ 1. Annie Swensen, born April 8, 1861 in Pleasant Grove, died February 21, 1920 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 2. Marie Swensen, born November 8, 1863 in Pleasant Grove, died on November 18, 1865 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 3. Swen Larsen Swensen, born February 17, 1865 in Pleasant Grove, died June 12, 1936 in Oakland, California. Interment, Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 4. Mary Mette Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born January 14, 1867 in Pleasant Grove, died April 2, 1959 in Monticello, Utah. Interment, Ogden, Utah. ~ ~ 5. John Canute Swensen [BYA High School 1888; BYA Collegiate Diploma 1900], born February 4, 1869 in Pleasant Grove, died August 30, 1953 in Provo, Utah. ~ ~ 6. Eliza Johanne Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born July 7, 1871 in Pleasant Grove, died September 17, 1931. ~ ~ 7. Hanson P. Swensen, born October 1, 1873 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on October 5, 1873 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 8. Caroline Christine Swensen, born November 8, 1874 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on December 3, 1874 in Pleasant Grove.

Swenson, Mary Mette [Swensen,]

Swenson, Mary Mette [Swensen,]

Mary Swenson

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Mary Swenson. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Her parents were: Father: Knud (Canute) Svendsen, born April 11, 1827 in Veibye, Hjorring, Denmark, died on March 14, 1902 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Mother: Johanne Maire Pedersen, born September 13, 1833 in Sevenolstrup, Viborg, Denmark, died on May 7, 1880 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They married on June 24, 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They had eight children: ~ ~ 1. Annie Swensen, born April 8, 1861 in Pleasant Grove, died February 21, 1920 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 2. Marie Swensen, born November 8, 1863 in Pleasant Grove, died on November 18, 1865 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 3. Swen Larsen Swensen, born February 17, 1865 in Pleasant Grove, died June 12, 1936 in Oakland, California. Interment, Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 4. Mary Mette Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born January 14, 1867 in Pleasant Grove, died April 2, 1959 in Monticello, Utah. Interment, Ogden, Utah. ~ ~ 5. John Canute Swensen [BYA High School 1888; BYA Collegiate Diploma 1900], born February 4, 1869 in Pleasant Grove, died August 30, 1953 in Provo, Utah. ~ ~ 6. Eliza Johanne Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born July 7, 1871 in Pleasant Grove, died September 17, 1931. ~ ~ 7. Hanson P. Swensen, born October 1, 1873 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on October 5, 1873 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 8. Caroline Christine Swensen, born November 8, 1874 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on December 3, 1874 in Pleasant Grove.

Wall, Alonzo Edward, Sr.

Wall, Alonzo Edward, Sr.
Mesa, Arizona US

Alonzo & Sophia/Emma Wall

BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. Alonzo Wall. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008.~ ~ ~ ~ Alonso Edward Wall was born on December 14, 1859 in Manti, Utah. His parents were Frederick John Wall and Elizabeth Robinson. He married twice: First to Sophia Duffin on February 1, 1883 in Salt Lake City, Utah; Second, he married Emma Olivia Asplund on November 25, 1920 in Manti, Utah. Alonzo Edward Wall, Sr., died on June 6, 1947 in Mesa, Arizona. Interment, Castledale, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Sophia Duffin was born October 26, 1862 in Moroni, Utah. Her parents were Edward Duffin and Margarent (Peggy) Gledhill. She died on December 1, 1918 in Castledale, Utah. Interment, Castledale, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Emma Olivia Asplund was born on September 18, 1879 in Fairview, Utah. Her parents were Olof Olofsson Asplund and Ingeborg Persson (Pehrson). She married twice: First, to William H. Page on June 22, 1908; and second, to Alonzo Edward Wall on November 25, 1920, in Manti, Utah. She died on December 11, 1927. ~ ~ ~ ~ [Do not confuse with: Alonzo E. Wall, Jr., born July 19, 1888 in Santaquin, Utah. He died September 1, 1959. Interment, Santaquin City Cemetery.]

1 2 Next Page