Class of 1889 H.S.


Alphabetical Alumni
411, Class of 1889

411, Class of 1889

Class of 1889 411

Brigham Young Academy, High School Class of 1889.

According to the report of Commencement Exercises in the Provo Daily Enquirer of May 28, 1889, twenty-three members of the Class of 1889 graduated with one or more certificates. According to Principal Karl G. Maeser, these were "the commencement exercises of the thirteenth academic year of the B. Y. Academy". After commencement exercises were completed, an afternoon concert was held, followed by an evening ball in the assembly room of the Academy. No collegiate graduates were mentioned.

Billings, Wallace

Billings, Wallace

Wallace Billings

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Wallace Billings received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Booth, Joseph Wilford

Booth, Joseph Wilford
Aleppo, Syria, Turkey TR

Joseph and 2 Booth

BY Academy High School Class of 1889, Collegiate Class of 1896. Joseph Wilford Booth. Joseph Booth received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1896. J. W. Booth of Alpine, Utah. Graduated May 1896 with Bachelor of Pedagogy (B.Pd.). Source 1: Deseret News, May 30, 1896. Source 2: Graduation Program 1896. Source 3: Students Record of Class Standings of B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 3. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Wilford Booth was born on August 14, 1866 in Alpine, Utah. His parents were Richard Thornton Booth and Elsie Edge Booth. He married twice: First, to Mary Rebecca Moyle on May 28, 1891 in Logan, Utah. Second, to Edith Young [Nora Effie Young] on June 23, 1915. He died on September 5, 1928 in Alleppo, Syria, Turkey, at the age of about 62. Interment, Alpine, Utah. [One record says he married Rose Harvey of Pleasant Grove, Utah -- would have been his third marriage.] ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Wilford Booth was born in Alpine, Utah, on August 14, 1866, the ninth of ten children in his family. His parents, Richard Thornton and Elsie Edge Booth, joined the Church in England and emigrated to Utah, settling in Alpine in 1858 when the Saints were moving south to avoid the imminent invasion of Johnston’s Army. Though living in a rough, frontier environment, and without benefit of formal schooling themselves, Richard and Elsie emphasized the importance of education with their children. Father Booth is reported to have said that his children “shall always have books even if they had to go without shoes or other necessities.” The children, though heavily engaged in farm labor and other jobs to help meet family needs, were all literate and learned to relish the life of the mind. Booth’s early journals reflect a fascinating mix of the drudgery of manual labor, characteristic of life in late 19th century rural Utah, and his delight in more cerebral interests. He was a “cowboy poet” if ever there was one, a rustic intellectual with an endlessly eager mind who wrote a prodigious number of poems and songs and newspaper articles, gave many public speeches, read voraciously, played chess, engaged in rough-and-tumble politics, and often out of curiosity attended Catholic and Protestant church services. During the long summer evenings while tending animals high in the Wasatch mountains, he studied the stars, organized debates on current issues, and devised number games and math problems to challenge his mind. Two entries from his journal reflect this interplay of rugged frontiersmanship and relentless inquisitiveness. July 22, 1889, after shearing sheep all day: “At night we had a debate in the tent. Subject: Resolved the Negro has more cause of complaint than the Indian. There were four on a side. The result was 7 to 6 in favor of the affirmative. I was on the losing side.” Nov. 14, 1890. On the way home, “had a horse race with an Indian . . . and at night made a lot of bullets for my rifle. And a few hours were spent in the study of astronomy & theology.” On October 15, 1887, at the age of 21, Booth began attending Brigham Young Academy in Provo. He loved his studies, once writing that the education offered at B.Y.A. was “more precious than Rubies”. His instructors included Abraham O. Smoot, Karl G. Maeser, and the brilliant young English scientist, James E. Talmage who later married May Booth, Wilford’s younger sister. The journals during this period reveal his enthusiasm for learning but also his painful awareness of being a farm boy lacking polish who often doubted whether he belonged there and wondered if he could succeed. Majoring in Pedagogy, he was a diligent, eager student who made many friends, developing along the way a reputation as an orator and comedian. He was selected by his classmates to give the “class humor” speech at graduation ceremonies for BYA. Booth graduated in with a Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) in 1896, nine years after he initially enrolled as a freshman. Booth’s delayed graduation can be explained by a phenomenon that continues even today to stretch time to graduation beyond the desired four-years: marriage. At the time he started attending BYA, Joseph was courting Miss Mary Rebecca Moyle, also from Alpine. Reba, as she was often called, was born in Alpine, Utah, on June 28, 1869. Her parents — pioneers who crossed the plains — were Henry Moyle and Mary Moss Moyle. She graduated from high school in Alpine, marrying Wilford in the Logan temple on May 28, 1890. After their marriage, the Booths lived in various places, including Pleasant View, Castle Rock, and Montpelier, Idaho. After moving back to Alpine, they built a new home and Wilford taught school and operated a general store. While Wilford was serving his first mission in the Middle East, they rented out their Alpine home and Reba lived with her relatives. She continued taking classes when possible at BYA, earning her Kindergarten teaching certificate in 1899 and teaching school in Alpine and Provo. These experiences teaching in school and church helped prepare her for leadership and teaching roles in the Turkish-Armenian missions, when she single- handedly established Primary and Relief Society organizations. ~ ~ ~ ~ In the late afternoon heat of August 3, 1898, an “immense crowd” of family and friends gathered to the meeting house block in Alpine, Utah, to honor a young LDS missionary, Joseph Wilford Booth, leaving the next day for his mission to Turkey. Together they picnicked, listened to speeches, sang songs, and engaged in “spirited” dancing. Handshaking, farewells, and kisses were abundant, and the customary collection to support a young elder’s mission yielded the hefty sum of $150. Booth’s subsequent travels took him across two continents and two oceans to Constantinople, the capital of the Ottoman Empire, and from there around Asia Minor to Aleppo, Syria. Booth had no idea that this bustling city, an ancient center of Middle Eastern trade and culture, would become a second home to him and, thirty years later, his final resting place. He eventually served three missions in the Middle East totaling seventeen years, during which he five times made the arduous trip across North America, the Atlantic Ocean, Europe, the Mediterranean, and Asia Minor; preached the restored gospel across the length and breadth of the Ottoman Empire, traveling by foot, horse, donkey, carriage, boat, car, train, and even bicycle; saved the lives of many Armenian church members after World War I; and meticulously wrote his observations in journals that would prove to be a rich repository of information about LDS church history and Middle Eastern social history in the late 19th and early 20th century. His journey from Alpine to Aleppo turned out to be physical, spiritual, and historical in nature, a watershed event that changed the course of his life, shaped the future of the Armenian members with whom he labored, and, long after his death, acted as a catalyst in establishing the Church and his alma mater, Brigham Young University, in the Middle East. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Wilford Booth served for seventeen years during his three missions to the Middle East: from 1898-1902 as a proselyting elder, and from 1903-1909 and 1921-1928 as president. His wife, Reba Booth, served for ten years (1903-1909 and 1924-1928) with her husband while he was presiding over the mission and was the only sister missionary during that time. The Booths’ mission experiences following World War I are particularly noteworthy. In 1921, three years after the end of the war, Booth approached the First Presidency about providing help for the members in Turkey who had been sending letters pleading for assistance. In response, President Heber J. Grant called Booth as president of the newly named Armenian Mission and gave him the charge “to go to Turkey to carry help to the Saints there”. When President Booth arrived in the Middle East in November 1921, he found the mission in total disarray and ravaged by war: the number of church members was depleted by death, emigration, and deportation, and those who remained were scattered, lonely, and suffering from disease and starvation. One of the Armenian saints, a young man named Reuben Ouzounian, states in his autobiography that “all the Aintab Branch presidency lost their lives, as did a great many of the members.” He adds that “at times, the people had to eat the leaves of trees” to survive. Rather than pursuing normal ecclesiastical and missionary activities, then, Booth focused his efforts on dealing with problems of disease, poverty, illiteracy, and unemployment among church members. In December 1921, because of continued threats against Armenians and the dangers posed by the Turkish civil war, Booth petitioned General De Lamothe of France (which controlled Syria and parts of southern Turkey in the post-war mandate period) to evacuate LDS church members from Aintab, Turkey to Aleppo, Syria where they could be given proper care and safekeeping. The general was reluctant at first to approve Booth’s request and set a precedent that would “stir up strife” with other groups, but he finally relented. Booth noted in his journal: “I have prayed almost night and day for the Lord to open the way for us to rescue the Saints, and they in Aintab have fasted for 8 days so they write, and I surely felt to thank God for his answer to my prayers when the General at last said, ‘We will grant you permission to bring the 50.’” President Booth next turned his energies to the logistical challenges of transporting the members (including small children and women in poor health) and their household goods over sixty miles of wintry muddy roads to Aleppo. As preparations for departure neared completion, Booth began to have some second thoughts about the wisdom of this move, but these doubts quickly passed: “No persuasion could change the desire of the Saints to get out of the country in which they had seen so much suffering and bloodshed.” Booth then returned to Aleppo to prepare for the arrival of the Saints from Aintab, and to his great satisfaction was able to rent eight rooms with a communal kitchen and outdoor bathrooms in a building called Khan Jebria. On Friday evening, December 16, the train of 10 wagons and 57 people arrived in Aleppo after a grueling four-day journey from Aintab. Of the safe arrival of the little convoy he later wrote with satisfaction and gratitude: All was confusion in mud and rain, but we finally settled down for the night. I am now thankful to the Lord for his mercy unto us. He has guided and controlled affairs for us in answer to our fastings and prayers in such a marvelous manner that I am truly anxious to manifest my gratitude and heartfelt thanks and praise unto Him who has led the little flock out of the danger of death and destruction which seems to be hanging over the city of once proud now almost ruined Aintab. This exodus from Aintab was subsequently viewed by the Armenian Saints as a miraculous event in Church history – a “manifestation of God’s power and goodness” as Booth said – and was commemorated each year on December 16 in programs featuring original plays, poems, songs, essays, and stories written by the Armenian members. Booth’s final journal entry, dated December 3, 1928, reflects the energy, industry, and selflessness that had characterized his life of 62 years. It reads: “Was busy all day with checking, packing, and shipping the rugs.” Just below, written in Sister Booth’s hand, is this touching note: “My dear husband, Joseph Wilford Booth, passed away Dec. 5, 1928, at Aleppo, Syria.” President Booth was buried in Aleppo next to one of his own missionaries, Elder Emil Huber, whose funeral he had supervised twenty years earlier. Booth’s own words, written in tribute to the four LDS missionaries who had died in the Middle East, apply now to him and make a fitting epitaph: "We do not complain that they are here, neither do I think their loved ones at home feel that any slight has been intended. It seems more like the ruling of a wise Providence to allow their bodies to rest here under the dew and the sod, 'that their monuments might perpetuate their work in bearing witness of the truth.' . . . Each one has gained a good name, better than precious ointment. Each died in honor and in the harness of the priesthood, and surely the rest of each will be a glorious one." ~ ~ Alice Louise Reynolds Lecture, BYU, April 3, 2002: “From Alpine to Aleppo: The Booth Journals as Chronicle and Catalyst of LDS Growth in the Middle East” By James A. Toronto with David P. Charles, Laura R. Ostler, and Joshua W. Gubler.

Brockbank, John

Brockbank, John

John Brockbank

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. John Brockbank received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Calvin, William

Calvin, William

William Calvin

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. William Calvin received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Christensen, George Frank(lin) (1889)

Christensen, George Frank(lin) (1889)
Fairview, Utah US

George and Hulda Christensen

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. George Christensen received high school certificates for Physiology and Elocution in 1889. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ George Frank Christensen was born on August 1, 1868 in St. Thomas, Lincoln County, Nevada. His parents were Mads Frederick Theobald Christensen and Kirstine Sophie (Sophia) Christina Rasmussen. He married Hulda Charlotte (Charlottie) Sanderson on December 18, 1890 in Manti, Utah. He was a schoolteacher. He died on October 18, 1907 in Fairview, Sanpete County, Utah, at the age of about 39. Interment, Fairview, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ OBITUARY OF HIS DAUGHTER: Phyllis May Christensen Jones, 97, passed away March 26, 2003, in Provo, Utah. Phyllis was born May 18, 1905, in Fairview, Utah, the daughter of George Franklin Christensen and Hulda Charlotte Sanderson. In 1926, Phyllis received a teaching certificate from Brigham Young University, then taught elementary school in Indianola until her marriage to Naylor Lionel Jones on May 23, 1928. Naylor died in 1965. Phyllis loved music, crocheting, quilting, reading, Jeopardy, and two days before she died, she was still doing crossword puzzles with a pen. She valued her membership in the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers and her membership in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, where she served faithfully in Primary and Relief Society. She is survived by her children: Norma (Ed) Melzer, Salem; Nadine (Markel) Caldwell, Provo; and Charlotte Jensen of Salt Lake; 16 grandchildren, 58 great-grandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, March 29, 2003, in the Grandview 5th Ward LDS Chapel, 1555 North 1350 West, Provo. Her interment, Fairview City Cemetery. [Deseret News, Friday, March 28, 2003.]

Holdaway, Joseph Alma

Holdaway, Joseph Alma
Provo, Utah US

Alma &Sarah/Mary/Amy Holdaway

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Alma Holdaway received Certificates: Drawing, Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1889. J. A. Holdaway received a Certificate: Physics. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Alma (known as Alma) Holdaway was born September 25, 1862 in Mount Pleasant, Utah. His parents were David Oscar Holdaway and Elizabeth Amanda Prater Holdaway. He married three times: First, to Sarah Elizabeth Robinson [BYA HS Class of 1882], on July 28, 1886 in Logan, Utah; Second, to Mary Clarkson Nuttall [BYA HS Class of 1886] on May 29, 1931 in Salt Lake City, Utah; and Third, to Amy Umpleby, dates not given. He died on June 15, 1943 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo, Utah.

Iverson, Gustave

Iverson, Gustave

Gustave Iverson

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Gustave Iverson received Certificates: Penmanship, Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Jacobs, Joseph

Jacobs, Joseph

Joseph Jacobs

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Joseph Jacobs received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Johnson, John (1889)

Johnson, John (1889)
Provo, Utah US

John Johnson

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. John Johnson received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. Faculty & Staff. John Johnson, Orthography, 1885-1890. The orthography of a language is the set of symbols (glyphs and diacritics) used to write a language, as well as the set of rules describing how to write these glyphs correctly, including spelling, punctuation, and capitalization. The term is derived from Greek ορθο ortho- ("correct") and γραφος graphos ("that writes"). Orthography is distinct from typography. Orthography includes the writing system of a language. English, for example, has an alphabet of 26 letters for both consonants and vowels, but no glyph for stress. However, each English letter may represent more than one sound, and each English sound (phoneme) may be written by more than one letter. An example of an orthographic rule describing how letters are used is i before e except after c; another is that the plural is written with the letter s regardless of whether it is pronounced as an [s], as in cats, or as a [z], as in dogs. In addition, combinations of letters called digraphs, such as th, represent single sounds in English orthography. Other languages which use the same alphabet as English may not use the same digraphs.

Jorgensen, Enoch

Jorgensen, Enoch

Enoch Jorgensen

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Enoch Jorgensen received Certificates: Penmanship, Elocution, and Rhetoric. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Lund, Anthony Canute (1891)

Lund, Anthony Canute (1891)
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Anthony & Cornelia Lund

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. A. C. Lund [Anthony -- not Anton] received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. A. C. Lund. He was the Valedictorian of his class. He received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Anthony Canute Lund ( – June 11, 1935) served as the director of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in Salt Lake City, Utah from 1916 until 1935. Lund was also a professor of music at Brigham Young Academy and then in 1903 at Brigham Young University. Lund was the son of Swedish immigrant Anthon H. Lund in Ephraim, Utah Territory, and his mother was Sarah Ann Peterson Lund. Anthony C. Lund was born on February 25, 1871. At 18 he was made choir director in Ephraim. In 1889 he graduated from Brigham Young Academy high school, and in 1891 he graduated from Brigham Young Academy as a teacher. He then studied at the Royal Conservatory in Leipzig. He also did studies in London and Paris. His departure from Brigham Young University to direct the Tabernacle Choir was viewed as a loss to BYU. Anthony C. Lund married Cornelia Sorenson. In 1897, Lund became head of what was then the Brigham Young Academy Music Department. Under his direction it was changed from being a department to being a school of music in 1901. He helped recruit Professor Albert Miller to teach and direct the brass band and Academy Orchestra. He continued as head of the Music Department after the school became Brigham Young University. He also was on the faculty of the Utah Conservatory and the McCune School of Music. Lund implemented a European choral sound in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir as its director. While Lund was director, the choir made its first electrical recordings on the Victor Label.

Lyman, Richard Roswell

Lyman, Richard Roswell
Provo, Utah US

Richard and Amy Lyman

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. Richard R. Lyman received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Normal Class of 1891. Richard Roswell Lyman. He served as President of the High School Normal Senior Class of 1891. Received a Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. Confirmed: BYU Special Collections UA 1008. ~ ~ ~ ~ Board of Trustees, 1939 to 1944. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Richard R. Lyman, BYA Mathematics and Physics teacher, 1895-1896. Richard Roswell Lyman was a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles. He was born Nov. 23, 1870, at Fillmore, Millard County, Utah, the son of Francis M. Lyman and Clara Caroline Callister. His father was president of the Council of the Twelve for thirteen years and a member of that Council thirty-six years. Amasa M. Lyman, the grandfather of Richard R. Lyman, was a member of the Council of the Twelve for twenty-eight years. On his mother's side, Richard R. Lyman belonged to the fifth generation of members of the Church. His great grandfather, John Smith, the Prophet's uncle, was one of the presiding Patriarchs of the Church. The mother of this Patriarch also belonged to the Church. Richard R. Lyman's grandmother, on his mother's side, was Caroline Smith Callister, the only sister of the late George A. Smith, who was a counselor to President Brigham Young. In April, 1878, at the age of seven years, he moved with his father's family to Tooele, Tooele County, Utah, where his father had been called to preside over the Tooele Stake of Zion. Richard R. Lyman was baptized July 29, 1879, and soon afterwards ordained a Deacon. At the age of eight (in the summer of 1879), Richard R. was placed in charge of his father's fine driving team and Concord buggy. While he was not big enough to hitch the team to the buggy, the team being unusually full of life, he took pride, under his father's direction and encouragement, in keeping the horses, harness, buggy and barn in clean and first class condition. In 1881-1882 he drove team for both his father and President Heber J. Grant, who had succeeded his father as president of the Tooele Stake. It always afforded the boy great joy to meet President Grant at the Tooele station or at Lake Point with his fine team, and he never forgot with what relish he ate candy and raisins with President Grant, as they rode together from the station or went about Tooele County on Stake business. In the fall of 1882, at the age of twelve, Richard R. was sent to Provo to attend school in the Brigham Young Academy. He was a student in that institution when the fire occurred which made it necessary to move the educational institution into another part of the city. Richard R. spent two summers working at the "Mill" located near E T City, on the shore of Great Salt Lake. Here he milked many cows, assisted in hauling logs for lumber, out of the mountains, etc. For two years Richard R. worked at the ranch of Hyrum E. Booth, near Grantsville, and he regarded the training given him and hard work he was required to do by Hyrum E. Booth and his industrious wife and family as one of the most valuable trainings that came into his life. An expert gardener from England pruned the trees, planted and cared for the garden and did the irrigating on the two homes belonging to Francis M. Lyman in Tooele. When this work was turned over later to Richard R. as a boy, he followed the example set for him by the English gardener. In August, 1888, with his sister Mary, he went to the Brigham Young Academy at Provo to study. At that time this educational institution was under the able leadership of Karl G. Maeser. Richard R. was ordained a Teacher by Bishop Thos. Atkin, Jr., Sept. 16, 1888. While attending school in Provo, Richard R. began a courtship with Miss Amy Brown, which covered continuously a period of eight years. To this girl, whom he married Sept. 9, 1896 (President Joseph F. Smith performing the ceremony), Richard R. always regarded himself as greatly indebted for whatever degree of success came to him in the business world, in the educational field or in Church work. After a summer of hard work at Grantsville, Richard R. and his sister Mary were sent by their father to the Brigham Young College at Logan, which institution then was under the direction of Dr. Joseph M. Tanner. During this school year (1889-1890), Richard R. began his labors as an assistant teacher in the college. While in Logan he took out special certificates in plane and solid geometry, algebra and physiology. The following year, in Provo, his studies covered trigonometry, analytic geometry, theory of teaching, psychology, logic, surveying, physics and rhetoric. During the summer of 1890, Richard R. was employed as a bookkeeper in the combined jewelry and furniture store of T. B. Cardon & Co. at Logan, and during the summer of 1891 he was bookkeeper for the Utah Manufacturing & Building Co. at Mill Creek, near Salt Lake City. Thus far during his school life Richard R. had been required to furnish his own clothing, his own books and his own spending money, while his father had paid his tuition and board. When Richard R. now asked his father for an opportunity to go East to college, the father offered to lend him the necessary means for a period of four years, an offer which the son promptly accepted. Repaying this money and the interest on it at the rate of 10 per cent, required a period of seven years, the principal amounting to nearly $2500. Richard R. was ordained an Elder, Aug. 29, 1891, by Joseph F. Smith and after he went East to study. While he attended the University at Ann Arbor, primarily for the purpose of studying mathematics with the thought of teaching in the Brigham Young University at Provo, and while he registered in the department of civil engineering, he devoted a great deal of time to the study of literature, history and public speaking. During his sophomore year he was elected president of his class and was elected to the same position a second time during his senior year. Richard R. spent all his vacations in hard work; one was devoted to the study of chemistry at the University at Michigan, while two were devoted to traveling through the State selling school supplies for a business firm at Chicago, and one was spent as assistant mine and railroad surveyor in the Tintic mining district, Utah. The school year 1895-1896 was spent in the Brigham Young University as principal of the High School and head of the department of mathematics and physics. Beginning in the fall or 1896 and continuing until the spring of 1918, Richard R. Lyman, in the University of Utah, passed through all the grades of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor and full professor in charge of the department of civil engineering. He held a full professorship and was head of the department for eighteen years. With his family Professor Lyman spent the summer of 1902 doing advanced work in the University of Chicago; thence he went to Cornell University where he was given a residence credit of three years. While there, with the class of 1903, he was graduated with the degree of M. C. E. (Master of Civil Engineering). In the spring of 1904 he was elected by the faculty of Cornell University to membership in the society of The Sigma Xi, a scientific organization into which only those who have achieved marked success and have unusual ability in the line of scientific investigation and research are supposed to be received. With the class of 1905 he was graduated with the degree of Ph. D. (Doctor of Philosophy). In one year he was awarded the only scholarship offered by the college of civil engineering and during another the only fellowship offered by that same department. From 1909 to 1918 he served as vice-chairman of the Utah State Road Commission. During this nine years of service the work of the State Road Commission, from a beginning with little funds, so advanced that at the expiration of this time the State Road Commission was expending in the neighborhood of three-fourths to a million dollars annually. The Utah State Road Commission was created in 1909 and Richard R. Lyman was one of its original members and its first vice-chairman, which position he held during the whole nine years. He served as city engineer of Provo, was transitman on a railroad survey from Springville through Hobble Creek Canyon toward the Uintah reservation for Jesse Knight in 1898, and designed and superintended the construction of waterwork systems in nearly all the towns and smaller cities of Utah and many in Idaho and Wyoming. For years he conducted an office as a civil and consulting engineer. At various times he served as chief engineer and consulting engineer for the following companies: Melville Irrigation Company, Delta, Utah; Deseret Irrigation Company, Oasis, Utah; Oasis Land & Irrigation Company, with headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah; Delta Land & Water Company of Salt Lake City, Utah; Utah County Light & Power Company, American Fork, Utah, and Utah Copper Company of Salt Lake City. He was one of the original directors of the Intermountain Life Insurance Company and is at present serving as vice-president of this company. He was also president of the Giant Racer Company, vice-president of the Ensign Amusement Company, director of the Pleasant Green Water Company, president of the Lyman-Callister Company, and director of Heber J. Grant & Co. Bro. Lyman had experience in the Brigham Young University as a Priest, administering the Sacrament and doing other similar service. From the fall of 1895 to the summer of 1896 he acted as a counselor to Bryant S. Hinckley, superintendent of the Mutual Improvement Associations of the Utah Stake, when the Utah Stake embraced all of Utah county. In 1897 (Sept. 12th), he was ordained a High Priest by President Angus M. Cannon and set apart as superintendent of the YMMIA of Salt Lake Stake, which Stake then included the whole of Salt Lake County. He continued to serve in this capacity until the spring of 1902, when he, with his family, went to the University of Chicago, and later to Cornell University. For several years Bro. Lyman acted as supervisor of the parents' classes of the Ensign Stake. He was ordained an Apostle and set apart as a member of the Council of Twelve Apostles by President Joseph F. Smith April 7, 1918, in the Salt Lake Temple, assisted by Presidents Anthon H. Lund and Charles W. Penrose and the members of the Council of the Twelve. Richard R. Lyman and his wife, Amy B. Lyman, had two children, namely, Wendell Brown Lyman, born Dec. 18, 1897, in Salt Lake City, and Margaret Lyman, born Sept. 15, 1903, at Ithaca, New York. Despite the greatness of his intellect, his spiritual achievements and a distinguished ancestry, Elder Lyman fell into transgression and was excommunicated November 12, 1943. It is not the policy of the Church to publicize the reasons for disciplinary action, but it was the result of a personal transgression and not apostasy. Richard R. Lyman was rebaptized into the Church October 27, 1954. He died December 31, 1963 at Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1941, Richard R. Lyman started the Emeritus Club of the BYU Alumni Association, and he was elected its first president. About 150 "oldtimers" gathered for the first Alumni Emeritus Banquet during commencement week of 1941. Diantha Billings Worsley, Emma Stubbs Taylor, Alice Smoot Newell, Mary E. Cluff Little (?), Charles Albert Glazier, and Samuel D. Moore, members of Brigham Young Academy's first little class in 1876, attended the banquet.

McKendrick, Wilford McGavin

McKendrick, Wilford McGavin
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Wilford and Lydia McKendrick

BY Academy High School Class of 1889 and 1891, and BYA Collegiate Class of 1894 and 1897. Faculty. Wilford McGavin McKendrick. ~ ~ ~ ~ In 1889, Wilford McKendrick received a high school Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Normal Class of 1891. W. M. McKendrick. Received a high school Normal Diploma on May 21, 1891. Source: Graduation Program of the Normal Class of 1891. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford McKendrick. BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1894. He received the degree, Bachelor of Pedagogy (B. Pd.) on May 24, 1894. Source 1: Ogden Standard Examiner, May 26, 1894. Source 2: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 12. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1897. Wilford M. McKendrick. Received the degree of Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.) in May of 1897. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 27, 1897. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Wilford M. McKendrick, Librarian, Mathematics & Geography, 1885-1899. He appears in a photo of the first faculty to serve under Principal Benjamin Cluff in 1892. Among other positions McKendrick served as the librarian at Brigham Young Academy. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford was born on June 12, 1870 in Tooele, Utah. His parents were Robert Kennedy McKendrick, and Agnes McGavin McKendrick. Wilford married Lydia Wilson. They had eight children. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford McGavin McKendrick served as principal of Weber Stake Academy, the predecessor of Weber State University from 1908-1910. McKendrick had been a faculty member at Weber Academy before he became the principal, filling the vacancy left by David O. McKay when he resigned to serve as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve. Among other Church positions, he served as a counselor in the Ogden Stake presidency. ~ ~ ~ ~ Wilford M. McKendrick died on Monday, May 11, 1936 at the age of 66 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Nielson, Alexander [Nielsen,]

Nielson, Alexander [Nielsen,]

Alexander Nielson

BY Academy High School Class of 1889 and 1890. Alexander Nielson [in one place; Alexander Nielsen in the same article] received a Certificate: Physiology, Bookkeeping Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. BY Academy High School Class of 1890. Alexander Nielson, Normal diploma. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 23, 1890.

Pratt, Mabel

Pratt, Mabel

Mabel Pratt

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Mabel Pratt received a Certificate: Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Rydalch, William Edward

Rydalch, William Edward
South Pasadena, California US

William and Eva Rydalch

BY Academy High School Class of 1889, BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1894. In 1889 William Rydalch received a high school Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1894. W. E. Rydalch received his B. Pd. Degree from BY Academy in the Class of 1894. Source 1: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, page 14. Source 2: Ogden Standard Examiner, May 26, 1894. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. William E. Rydalch, Law & Geography teacher, 1885-1896, 1902-1904. ~ ~ ~ ~ William Edward Rydalch was born on June 27, 1868 in Grantsville, Utah. His parents were William Mitten Rydalch and Margaret Whitesides Hunter Rydalch. He married Eva Robison on October 29, 1890. She was born on January 17, 1874 in Fillmore, Utah. She died on March 26, 1913. Her parents were Joseph Vickery Robison and Martha Jane Olmstead Robison. W. E. Rydalch died on May 12, 1941 in South Pasadena, California. His interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Shelley, George

Shelley, George

George Shelley

BY Academy High School Class of 1889 and 1890. George Shelley received Certificates: Phonography (shorthand by dictation), and Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. BY Academy High School Class of 1890. George Shelly (sic), Bookkeeping. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 23, 1890.

Shepard, Julia

Shepard, Julia

Julia Shepard

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Julia Shepard received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Swalberg, Agusta

Swalberg, Agusta

Agusta Swalberg

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. Agusta Swalberg received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.

Swensen, John Canute (1888; 89; F&S)

Swensen, John Canute (1888; 89; F&S)
Provo, Utah US

John and Margaret Swensen

BY Academy High School Class of 1888, 1889, and Collegiate Class of 1900. John Swenson (Swensen) received a Diploma: Physiology & Hygiene, Rhetoric. Source: Deseret Evening News, May 28, 1888. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1889. John Swenson (sic) received a Certificate in Rhetoric. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1900. J. C. Swensen received a Diploma: Bachelor of Didactics (B. D.). Source: Deseret Evening News, June 2, 1900. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. John C. Swensen, Economics & Sociology teacher, 1898-1941. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Canute Swensen was born February 4, 1869 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. His parents: Knud (Canute) Svendsen and Johanne Maire Pedersen. John C. Swensen married Margaret Ellen Davies (Davies in Wales, Davis in America) on June 21, 1899 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had ten children, all of whom attended Brigham Young High School. He died on August 30, 1953 in Provo, Utah. Interment, Provo City Cemetery. ~ ~ ~ ~ John originally used the -SON spelling, but later in life he decided it would be better to use the -SEN spelling. John and Margaret had ten children; five of the children continued with the -SON spelling, but the other five changed and used the -SEN spelling. They had seven sons and three daughters as follows: ~ ~ 1. John Starr Swenson [BYH Class of 1917?], born March 27, 1900, died December 28, 1977. He married Marva Carter. ~ ~ 2. Carl Davis Swenson [BYH Class of 1919?], born August 3, 1901, died April 29, 1979. He married Lura Tanner. ~ ~ 3. Reed Knute Swenson [BYH Class of 1921], born February 16, 1903, died April 2, 1989. He married Ruth Freebairn. ~ ~ 4. Alice Swenson, born May 10, 1905, died in infancy. 5. Margaret Swensen [BYH Class of 1923], born May 29, 1906, died January 30, 1987. She married James L. Jacobs. ~ ~ 6. Francis McLean Swenson (Mac) [BYH Class of 1926?], born June 29, 1908, died August 22, 1963. He married Willa Sowards. ~ ~ 7. Louise Swensen [BYH Class of 1928?], born May 24, 1910, died October 5, 1992. She married Jay Tolman. ~ ~ 8. Joseph Cadwallader Swensen [BYH Class of 1931], born June 15, 1913, died May 9, 2005. He married Verna Harding. ~ ~ 9. Albert Donald Swensen [BYH Class of 1933], born May 28, 1915, died October 6, 2001. He married Jennie Romney. ~ ~ 10. Richard Davis Swensen [BYH Class of 1936], born July 7, 1919. He married Arleen Stowell. ~ ~ ~ ~ His parents were: Father: Knud (Canute) Svendsen, born April 11, 1827 in Veibye, Hjorring, Denmark, died on March 14, 1902 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Mother: Johanne Maire Pedersen, born September 13, 1833 in Sevenolstrup, Viborg, Denmark, died on May 7, 1880 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They married on June 24, 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. They had eight children: ~ ~ 1. Annie Swensen, born April 8, 1861 in Pleasant Grove, died February 21, 1920 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 2. Marie Swensen, born November 8, 1863 in Pleasant Grove, died on November 18, 1865 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 3. Swen Larsen Swensen, born February 17, 1865 in Pleasant Grove, died June 12, 1936 in Oakland, California. Interment, Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 4. Mary Mette Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born January 14, 1867 in Pleasant Grove, died April 2, 1959 in Monticello, Utah. Interment, Ogden, Utah. ~ ~ 5. John Canute Swensen [BYA High School 1888; BYA Collegiate Diploma 1900], born February 4, 1869 in Pleasant Grove, died August 30, 1953 in Provo, Utah. ~ ~ 6. Eliza Johanne Swensen [BYA Collegiate Diploma 1891], born July 7, 1871 in Pleasant Grove, died September 17, 1931. ~ ~ 7. Hanson P. Swensen, born October 1, 1873 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on October 5, 1873 in Pleasant Grove. ~ ~ 8. Caroline Christine Swensen, born November 8, 1874 in Pleasant Grove, died as an infant on December 3, 1874 in Pleasant Grove.

Tanner, Caleb

Tanner, Caleb
Provo, Utah US

Caleb Tanner

BY Academy High School Class of 1888 and 1889. Caleb Tanner received a Diploma: Bookkeeping and General Chemistry. Source: Deseret Evening News, May 28, 1888. BY Academy Class of 1889. Caleb Tanner received Certificates: Physics, Algebra, Geometry. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. Faculty & Staff. Caleb Tanner, Geometry & Engineering, 1897-1904.

Taylor, Thomas Nicholls

Taylor, Thomas Nicholls
Provo, Utah US

Thomas and Maud Taylor

BYA Class of 1889 ~ Honorary. BYU / BYH Board of Trustees, 1921 to 1939. Thomas Nicholls Taylor (1868-1950) — also known as Thomas N. Taylor — of Provo, Utah County, Utah. Born in 1868. Democrat. Mayor of Provo, Utah, 1900-1903; delegate to Democratic National Convention from Utah, 1912. Died on October 24, 1950. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Thomas N. Taylor went to the Franklin Elementary School at 2nd South and 1st West in Provo under the principalships of Anna Larson, L.A. Wilson, and George H. Brimhall. He worked in his father's furniture store beginning at age 10. When Zina Young Williams, daughter of Brigham Young, came to teach at Brigham young Academy, she had two sons, Sterling and Thomas, who became good friends with young Tom. When he went to Brigham Young Academy in the Lewis Building on Center Street, one of his teachers was Aunt Zina, by then Zina Young Card. After the Lewis Building burned on January 27, 1884, Tom was in the group which went to the temporary school in the ZCMI warehouse at the south end of Academy (now University) Avenue. Among the many classes he took was an arithmetic class taught by Karl G. Maeser. Tom had to quit school in 1895, getting as far as our present-day 8th grade when he was seventeen. Had he continued on to graduation, he would have been in the BYA high school senior class of 1889. At the age of seventeen, he went into business for himself. More: See the TNT webpage, under construction.

Wootton, John Alma [Wooton,]

Wootton, John Alma [Wooton,]
Heber City, Utah US

John and Martha Wootton

BY Academy High School Class of 1889. John Wootton [Wooton in news article] received a Certificate: Elocution. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889. ~ ~ ~ ~ John Alma Wootton was born on December 8, 1866 in Midway, Utah. His parents were Attewall Wootton, Sr. and Cynthia Jane Jewett Wootton. The family was living in American Fork, Utah, in 1880. John married Martha Melvina Huffaker on February 20, 1895, in Salt Lake City, Utah. John A. Wootton died on March 25, 1933 in Heber City, Utah.

Young, John W.

Young, John W.

John W. Young

BY Academy High School Class of 1886 & 1889. John W. Young. Awarded Special Certificates in General Chemistry and Physics. Source: The (Provo) Daily Enquirer, May 25, 1886. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1889. John W. Young received Certificates: Bookkeeping, Rhetoric. Source: Utah Enquirer, May 28, 1889.