Class of 1881 H.S.


Alphabetical Alumni
411, Class of 1881

411, Class of 1881

Class of 1881 411

BY Academy Class of 1881.

According to Principal Karl G. Maeser's report published in The Territorial Enquirer newspaper, Provo, Utah on June 22, 1881, the BYA Class of 1881 included eighteen students:

High School, Commercial: 6. These six included: Thomas Adams, Oscar Berglund, George Gardner, Elias Kimball & J. Golden Kimball, and Angus Vance.

High School, Normal (Teachers): 11. These eleven included: Simon Eggertsen, Hannah Friel, Daniel Harrington, Mary John, Ida Keate, Laura Larsen, Rose Lee, Joseph Noble, Hannah Rees, Sadie Shepherd, and Elmira Wilson.

In 1881 the Academy recognized its first ever Collegiate graduate, James E. Talmage.

To indicate the diversity of students at BYA, the following quote is taken from Principal Maeser's report regarding its Normal (teaching) Department: "In the Normal dept., 35 students have been registered during the present year, of whom 3 have already been acting teachers and taken only a finishing course of one term*; 3 have given up the profession; 1 had left at the end of the third term to return next year; 11 were graduated that day, leaving 4 still in attendance." [The four still in attendance were: Isaiah M. Coombs, Flora Harvey, Nels Nelson, and Ettie Swarthout.]
________
*It is entirely likely that these three acting teachers who took a "finishing course" for one term, thereafter considered themselves to be BYA alumni, though their names are not listed in the Principal's Report.

Adams, Thomas Henry

Adams, Thomas Henry
Bunkerville, Nevada US

Thomas and 2 Adams

BY Academy High School Class of 1881, and Collegiate Class of 1884. Thomas Adams. Commercial. Certificate in Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic, and Certificate in Algebra. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. BY Academy Collegiate Class of 1884. Thomas Adams. Graduated Friday, June 13, 1884, with a Scientific collegiate diploma. It included proficiency in: Algebra, Geometry, Triginometry, Surveying, Physics, Chemistry and Bookkeeping. Source: Territorial Enquirer, Friday, June 13, 1884. This was one of the first 3 collegiate diplomas awarded at BYA. ~ ~ ~ ~ Thomas Henry Adams was born on September 11, 1864 in Nephi, Utah. His parents are Samuel Lorenzo Adams, Sr. and Mary Ann Morgan. He first married Mary Nageli [or Neagle] on December 10, 1885 in St. George, Utah; she was born on February 15, 1864 in Santa Clara, Utah. He second married Lillie May B Leavitt on December 10, 1930 in Bunkerville, Clark County, Nevada. He died on December 24, 1945 in Bunkerville, Nevada.

Berglund, Oscar Beck

Berglund, Oscar Beck
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Oscar and Jane Berglund

BY Academy High School Class of 1881 and 1882. Oscar Berglund. Commercial. Certificate in Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic, 1881. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1882. Oscar Berglund. Graduated June 16, 1882. 21 members of the Class of 1882 are mentioned. Source 1: Deseret Evening News, June 19, 1882. Source 2: Territorial Enquirer, June 21, 1882. ~ ~ ~ ~ O. B. [Oscar Beck] Berglund was born on November 17, 1858 in Fredrickshaven, Hjorring Ampt., Denmark. His parents were Carl Fredrick Berglund and Lucy (Lucie) Maria Beck Berglund. Oscar married Jane Watson Ferguson on April 18, 1917. Jane was born on October 27, 1885 in Dundee, Angus, Scotland. Her parents were John Belches Ferguson and Margaret Tillus Ferguson. Jane died on August 20, 1972 in Ogden, Utah. Her interment, Spanish Fork, Utah. Oscar B. Berglund died on October 23, 1930. His interment, Gunnison City Cemetery, Utah.

Driggs, Ella Olivia

Driggs, Ella Olivia
Pleasant Grove, UT US

Ella [& William H.] Driggs [King]

Class of 1881, Honorary. Ella Olivia Driggs. While a student at Brigham Young Academy, Ella first met William Henry King, Class of 1881. William later became one of Utah's brilliant lawyers, a judge, an orator, and for several terms, U.S. Senator. Ella Olivia Driggs was born on March 26, 1859 in Pleasant Grove, Utah. Her parents were Benjamin Woodbury Driggs Sr. and Olivia Thankful Pratt Driggs. William and Ella fell in love, and were engaged to be married. Ella became ill, died and was buried in her wedding dress. She died on October 21, 1883 in Pleasant Grove. She was buried on October 24, 1883 in Pleasant Grove. She was sealed to William H. King on November 5, 1884 in the Logan Temple. They obviously had no children. When Ella's brother was born two years after her death, her parents named him William King Driggs in honor of Ella Olivia and the man she was about to marry. William King Driggs graduated from Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1905.

Eggertsen, Simon Peter, Jr.

Eggertsen, Simon Peter, Jr.
Provo, Utah US

Simeon and Etta Eggertsen

BY Academy High School Class in 1876, and 1881. Simon P. (S. P.) Eggertsen, Jr. One of the original 29 students who registered on the first day of classes at Brigham Young Academy, January 3, 1876. [Do not confuse with Sara (S.) Eggertsen.] He is also listed on a list of 59 names of the earliest students of Brigham Young Academy, taken from a file in the BYU Archives, made by an unknown contemporary student. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Simon Eggertsen. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1934. Simon P. Eggertsen. He received an M.S. Degree in History in 1934. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 259. ~ ~ ~ ~ Simon Peter Eggertsen, Jr., was born on September 15, 1860 in Provo, Utah, to Simon Peter Eggertsen, Sr., and Johanna Andreasen Thompson Eggertsen. He married "Etta" Henrietta Petrea Nielsen [or Nelson] on June 26, 1884 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died February 20, 1938 in Provo, Utah, at about 78 years of age. His interment, Provo City Cemetery.

Friel, Hannah Sharp

Friel, Hannah Sharp
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Hannah and Samuel Davis

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Hannah Friel. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Hannah Sharp Friel was born March 11, 1863 in Springville, Utah. Her parents were Edward Friel (sometimes Freel) and Margaret Ann Elizabeth Herbel (sometimes Harbell). Hannah married Samuel Llewellyn Morgan Davis on October 5, 1891 in Springville, Utah. Hannah Friel Morgan died on May 28, 1951 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Parker, Fremont County, Idaho.

Gardner, George D.

Gardner, George D.
Cokeville, Wyoming US

George and Eugenia Gardner

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. George D. Gardner. Commercial. Certificate in Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic, and Certificate in Algebra. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ George Delos Gardner was born on December 21, 1853 in Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, Utah. His parents were Archibald Gardner and Laura Althea Thompson Gardner. George married Eugenia Laurania Huffaker on May 8, 1884 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Eugenia was born on March 15, 1861 in South Cottonwood, Salt Lake County, Utah. Her parents were Simpson David Huffaker and Rhoda Priscilla Barnum Huffaker. Eugenia died on September 27, 1935 in West Jordan, Utah. Her interment, Murray, Utah. George D. Gardner died on July 25, 1922 in Cokeville, Lincoln County, Wyoming. His interment, Murray, Utah.

Harrington, Daniel Henry

Harrington, Daniel Henry
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Daniel and Leonora Harrington

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Daniel Harrington. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Daniel H. Harrington. Also Faculty & Staff. Judge Daniel H. Harrington, Training School, 1881-1884. Born March 15, 1860 in American Fork, Utah. Young Daniel was an eager student and learned to be an omniverous reader. His father encouraged him in his desire to go to college when such an education was not too popular or well known. He graduated from Brigham Young Academy in 1881, after matriculating for three years. His classmates included George Sutherland, John E. Booth, D.D. Houtz, J.L. Robison, Zina Young Williams Card, William H. King, James E. Talmadge and J.M. Tanner, to name a few. Daniel attended BYA in the Lewis Building on Provo's Center Street. Visitors frequently attended the classes. Professor Milton Hardy presided at Wednesday conclaves while Professor Maeser would leave the platform to play the organ. Whenever Leonard E. Harrington, BYA Trustee and father of Daniel, visited the school, either for an assembly or in a class, Professor Hardy would gravely call upon Daniel to give the opening or closing prayer. Discomforted, Daniel said, "All eyes fell on me as soon as father entered the room." Teacher, Principal, Superintendent, Attorney, Civil and Business leader. ~ ~ ~ ~ His BYA report card for 1879-1880, signed by James E. Talmage for Karl G. Maeser, is found in the BYU Archives. ~ ~ ~ ~ Daniel Henry Harrington was born on March 15, 1860 in American Fork, Utah. His parents were Leonard Ellsworth Harrington and Mary Jones Harrington [or Lois Russell Harrington]. Daniel married Leonora Young Taylor on March 17, 1886 in Logan, Utah. Daniel H. Harrington died on November 30, 1943 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Salt Lake City, Utah.

John, Mary Jane

John, Mary Jane
Provo, Utah US

Mary Jane & Benjamin Cluff

BY Academy High School Class in 1876, and 1881. Mary Jane John. One of the original 29 students who registered on the first day of classes at Brigham Young Academy, January 3, 1876. She is also included on a list of 59 names of the earliest students of Brigham Young Academy, taken from a file in the BYU Archives, made by an unknown contemporary student. ~ ~ ~ ~ BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Mary John. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ She married Benjamin Cluff, Jr., third principal of Brigham Young Academy. ~ ~ ~ ~ Mary Jane John was born on July 23, 1862 [a few records say 1863] in Provo, Utah. Her parents: David John and Mary Wride John. She married Benjamin Cluff on August 16, 1883, in Salt Lake City, Utah, when she was 21 years old. She died on February 27, 1934, in Provo, Utah, at the age of 71. Interment, Provo City Cemetery.

Keate, Ida

Keate, Ida
Los Angeles, California US

Ida and Rawl Callaway

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Ida Keate. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ida Keate was born on September 23, 1862 in St. George, Utah. Her parents were James Keate and Bena Christina Christofersen [or Jacobine Christina Christoffersen] Keate. Ida married Samuel Rollo [Rawl] Callaway in 1888 in St. George, Utah. Samuel Rollo Callaway was born on January 23, 1863 in Manti, Utah. Rawl's parents were Levi Hamilton Callaway and Mary Frances Vanburen. Rawl Callaway died on July 31, 1939 in Los Angeles, California. His interment, Los Angeles, California. Ida died on January 12, 1950 in Los Angeles, California. Her interment, Valhalla Cemetery, Los Angeles, California. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ BRIEF BIO: Samuel Rollo Callaway born January 23, 1863 in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. He was listed as a miner on the 1910 Utah census. He married Ida Keate in 1888. Ida's father was born in England, and her mother was born in Denmark. They had five children, two daughters and three sons: daughter Georgia Callaway was born 1889 in Utah; son A. Walter Callaway was born 1891 in Utah; daughter Nevada Callaway was born 1895 in Utah; son Sheldon K. Callaway was born 1901 in Utah; and son Robert Cecil Callaway was born 1903 in Utah. By 1920 they had moved to Los Angeles, California. Their daughter, Nevada, was a stenographer for a moving pictures company in Los Angeles. Ida and Samuel were separated by 1920, and divorced by 1930. Samuel died in Los Angeles, California on July 31, 1939. Source: Callaway Family Association Blog, Friday, August 13, 2004

Kimball, Elias Smith

Kimball, Elias Smith
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Elias and 2 Kimball

BY Academy High School Class of 1881, and Class of 1882. Elias Kimball. Commercial. Certificate in Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Elias Smith Kimball was born on May 30, 1857 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Heber Chase Kimball and Christeen Golden Kimball. Elias married twice: first, to Luella Whitney on December 18, 1889. Luella was born on November 8, 1868 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Luella's parents were John Kimball Whitney and Ann Longstroth Whitney. Luella died on April 23, 1959. ~ ~ Elias S. Kimball second married Anna Gray Richardson, who was born in 1873 in Pomeroy, Meigs County, Ohio. Anna died on June 9, 1900. ~ ~ ~ ~ Elias S. Kimball was one of the brothers of Jonathan Golden Kimball, one of the most colorful and beloved of the General Authorities, who became one of the First Seven Presidents of Seventies from 1892 until his death in 1938. The Kimball boys were carefully trained by their father. They were living in such close proximity to their father that they were ever under his very watchful care. Their father died June 22, 1868, and after some very difficult economic times, their mother went out the second time, in 1875, as a pioneer, and with her family located in Meadowville, Rich County, Utah. This was where Elias and his brother, J. Golden, partners in business from that time forward, purchased four hundred acres of farm and meadow land by signing a note for $1,000. In that cold, northern clime they established a ranch and farm, and for fifteen years followed the horse and cattle business. They were successful and accumulated considerable means, until about the turn of the century. Brigham Young Academy Principal Karl G. Maeser ventured a visit to the isolated little settlement of Meadowville, made up largely of eleven of Heber C. Kimball's sons and their families. Maeser called the people together in a log school house and testified of God, and spoke in the interest of the Brigham Young Academy. The Spirit of God awakened and aroused Elias and his brother, J. Golden, and they said that for the first time they realized there was something else to be accomplished in life besides looking after cattle and horses. They repented of their weaknesses, reformed, and after great sacrifices and the overcoming of many difficulties, they both attended the Brigham Young Academy for two years, where they were guided and tutored by Dr. Maeser and his associate teachers. There they gained a testimony that God lives, and were loyal and true to the Brigham Young Academy from that time forward. Both Elias and Golden Kimball received Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic Certificates -- high school diplomas of that time -- in June of 1881, from Brigham Young Academy. Elias continued on for a third year, but no record has been found yet of what additional certificate or diploma he might have earned in 1882 as a result. Elias, together with Newel Kimball and J. Golden, entered into the implement business under the name of "Kimball Brothers," establishing places of business at Logan and Montpelier. They signed notes for the first time for over thirty thousand dollars. They labored hard for four years, and lost their investment, but saved their good name because they paid their debts. They exchanged their ranch was for Cache Valley property, and with the proceeds from the sale of their cattle and horses, invested in real estate. They were not yet convinced of the danger of speculation, but went into the real estate business during the boom, and bought everything almost that was for sale. They wound up their career as business men by investing in a company that had purchased 119,000 acres of land in Canada. What they failed to lose, their friends helped them out of, and they were spared the trials and tribulations of being wealthy. They learned: "Don't go in debt." His brother J. Golden Kimball was then called on August 1, 1891 by President Wilford Woodruff to succeed Elder William Spry as the president of the Southern States Mission. Notwithstanding J. Golden's health and his economic well being were both seriously impaired, it was good enough for him that the Prophet of the Lord promised him he should regain his health and be blessed of the Lord, which was literally fulfilled. J. Golden Kimball labored three years as president of the Southern States Mission, and was succeeded by Elias S. Kimball, his brother. Elias Kimball served as a Logan City Councilman from 1894 to 1896. Elias Smith Kimball died on June 13, 1934 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Kimball, Jonathan Golden

Kimball, Jonathan Golden
Salt Lake City, Utah US

J. Golden and Jennie Kimball

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Jonathan G. Kimball. Commercial. Certificate in Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ J. Golden Kimball, one of the most colorful and beloved of the General Authorities was one of the First Seven Presidents of Seventies from 1892 until his death in 1938. He was born in Salt Lake City, June 9, 1853, in a beautiful Utah home -- a residence of his father's, Heber C. Kimball, that was erected in 1848-49. His mother's name was Christeen Golden Kimball. She was the only member of her family that joined the Church. Elder Kimball was carefully trained by his father, as he was living in such close proximity to him that he was ever under his very watchful care. He had the privilege in his early years of accompanying his father with Pres. Brigham Young's large parties when visiting the settlements of the Saints. He was a student of various schools of Salt Lake City up to 1868, and had a life scholarship paid in what is now the University of Utah, but that lost value when his father died. He was also a student of the "Morgan Commercial College." His father died June 22, 1868, and being the eldest child of his mother's family, against his mother's wishes, he adopted the job of driving a team, hauled wood from the canyons, ore from the mines, etc. Notwithstanding every effort made by his mother to secure more elevating employment for him, it failed. His mother decided to go out the second time, in 1875, as a pioneer, and with her family located in Meadowville, Rich County, Utah, where J. Golden Kimball and his brother Elias, partners in business ever since, purchased four hundred acres of farm and meadow land with a $1,000 promissory note. In that cold, northern clime they established a ranch and farm, and for fifteen years followed the horse and cattle business. They were successful and accumulated considerable means up until about the turn of the century. From the time of his father's death, and up to the fall 1879, J. Golden Kimball said he was under no restraint of any kind, but was as free as the birds that fly in the air; no man's hand was stretched out to guide him in the footsteps of his father, until Principal Karl G. Maeser ventured to visit their isolated little settlement, made up largely of eleven of Heber C. Kimball's sons and their families. Maeser called the people together in a log school house and testified of God, and spoke in the interest of the Brigham Young Academy. The Spirit of God awakened and aroused J. Golden and his brother Elias, and they said that for the first time they realized there was something else to be accomplished in life besides looking after cattle and horses. They repented of their weaknesses, reformed, and after great sacrifices and the overcoming of many difficulties they both attended the Brigham Young Academy for two years, and were guided and tutored by Dr. Maeser and his associate teachers. They gained a testimony that God lives, and they have been loyal and true to the Brigham Young Academy ever since. Both Elias and Golden Kimball received Bookkeeping and Commercial Arithmetic Certificates -- high school diplomas of that time -- in June of 1881, from Brigham Young Academy. Elias stayed on for a third year. ~ ~ ~ ~ J. Golden Kimball was born on June 9, 1853 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Heber Chase Kimball, Apostle, and Christeen Golden, the tenth wife of Heber C. Kimball. J. Golden Kimball married just once, to Jeanette "Jane" Knowlton, daughter of John Q. Smith and Ellen Smith. They married on September 22, 1887, in Logan, Utah. They had six children: Jonathan "Jack" Kimball; Quince "Jane" Kimball; Elizabeth Kimball; Gladys Kimball; Richard Kimball; and Max Kimball. Ordained a member of the Seventy, J. Golden Kimball died in Nevada on September 2, 1938, at age 85, in an automobile accident. He was one of the most beloved General Authorities in the history of the Church, because of his exceptionally plain-spoken speaking, filled with memorable words and stories. ~ ~ ~ ~ Jonathan Golden Kimball was born on June 9, 1853 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Heber Chase Kimball and Christeen Golden Kimball. Golden married Jane (Jennie) Smith Knowlton on September 22, 1887 in Logan, Utah. Jennie was born on February 12, 1866 in Skull Valley, Davis County, Utah. Her parents were John Quincy Knowlton and Ellen Smith Knowlton. Jennie Kimball died on August 25, 1940 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Her interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. Elder J. Golden Kimball died on September 2, 1938 in Reno, Nevada. His interment, Salt Lake City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~
Quotes from J. Golden Kimball:
-- "Cut me off from the church? They can't do that! I repent too damn fast."
-- "I may not walk the straight and the narrow, but I sure in hell try to cross it as often as I can!"
-- "There are not enough general authorities to do all the thinking for the membership of the church."
-- "I love all of the brethren, but I love some a hell of a lot more than I do others."
-- "I don't know how the people of St. George can stand the heat, the Indians, the snakes and the flooding Virgin River. If I had a house in St. George and a house in Hell, I'd rent out the one in St. George and move straight to Hell."
-- "This city (Brigham City) looks like hell. You need to clean things up, mow the grass, paint your houses and barns. And you sisters, you could stand a little paint yourselves."
-- "Young men, always marry a woman from Sanpete County. No matter what hard times you experience together, she has seen worse."
-- "I understand you brethren can't go on missions because you swear too much. You can overcome it. Hell, I did.' .... More. ~ ~ ~ ~ In connection with Brigham Young Academy Commencement in May of 1899, an Alumni Banquet was held at the Hotel Roberts in Provo with about two hundred people attending. Four alumni spoke about different periods of time in the life of the Academy. "J. Golden Kimball's talk on the period from '77 to '84, when he was a student at the institution, was in a reminiscent strain. He was one of those who had graduated from the academy, he said, but who had forgotten to get his parchment. He marked his course at the academy, however, as the turning point in his life, for during his attendance at the school he had learned that the Gospel was true. He closed with the prophecy that the Brigham Young Academy would go on prospering, and among its alumni of the future would be numbers prophets and prophetesses, as well as congressmen and other high civil officers." Source: Deseret Evening News, May 27, 1899. [The other three speakers: Mrs. Hannah Stubbs Jones, Newton Noyes, and George H. Brimhall.]

King, William Henry

King, William Henry
Provo, Utah US

William and [3] King

Class of 1881. William Henry King. He was born in Fillmore, Utah Territory, in 1963. King was fascinated with property rights, water problems, federal, state or individual ownership, the nature of a contract, and the binding power of a deed or will. William H. King completed his Brigham Young Academy high school curriculum when he was seventeen years of age [1881]. He entered the University of Utah for a year, then served a mission to Europe for two and a half years. There he observed the various types of government with monarchy and experimental democracy. Returning home, he entered the University of Michigan Law School and graduated with his LLB. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYA Faculty & Staff. William Henry King, Law teacher, 1879-1880, 1891-1894. Source: Book, The Sons of Brigham, by T. Earl Pardoe, pp. 113-115. ~ ~ ~ ~ William H. King was born in Fillmore, Utah Territory in 1863. He attended Brigham Young Academy in Provo, Utah and the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He served as a missionary of the Mormon Church in Great Britain from 1880 to 1883. After holding local offices and serving two terms in the territorial legislature, he graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, joined the Utah bar and practiced law. He held other territorial offices and then served as an associate justice of the Utah Supreme Court between 1894 and 1896. After Utah became a state in 1896, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served in the 55th Congress from March 4, 1897 to March 3, 1899. He was not nominated for a second term, but when his replacement, Brigham H. Roberts was denied his seat because he was a polygamist, King was elected to complete Roberts' term and served from April 2, 1900 and March 3, 1901. He ran for the same position in 1900 and again in 1902, but lost both times. King was elected to the Senate four times and served between March 4, 1917 and January 3, 1941. He failed to win renomination in 1940. In 1918 and 1919, he served on the Overman Committee, which investigated seditious pro-German activity during World War I and Bolshevik-inspired anti-Americanism in the months following the war's end. He served as the President pro tempore of the Senate in 1939-41 during the Seventy-sixth Congress. He practiced law in Washington, D.C. until April 1947. He then returned to Utah and died there in 1949. His son, David S. King, also served in Congress. William Henry King (June 3, 1863 November 27, 1949) was an American lawyer, politician, and jurist from Salt Lake City, Utah. A Democrat, he represented Utah in the United States Senate from 1917 until 1941. ~ ~ ~ ~ William King also served on the Utah Supreme Court (1894-96) and in the U.S. House of Representatives (1897-99, 1900-01). From 1939-41, King was President pro tem of the U.S. Senate, i.e. highest-ranking Senator.

Larsen, Laura

Larsen, Laura
Spanish Fork, Utah US

Laura and Oran Lewis

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Laura Larsen. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Laura Larsen was born on March 11, 1864 in Fountain Green, Sanpete County, Utah. Her parents were Niels Peter Larsen and Christina Wilhelmina Swensen Larsen. Laura married Oran Amos Lewis on June 30, 1887 in Provo, Utah. Laura Larsen Lewis died on December 20, 1943 in Spanish Fork, Utah.

Lee, Rose

Lee, Rose
Provo, Utah US

Rose Lee

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Rose Lee. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ IS THIS? 1. Rose Lee of Ogden, Utah, married Alexander M. Stackland, also of Ogden, on March 21, 1892 in Ogden, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ OR IS THIS? 2. Rose E. Lee, married John T. Jarris, in St. George, Washington County, Utah, on September 14, 1909. ~ ~ ~ ~ OR IS THIS? 3. Rosanna Lee of Oakley, Idaho, who married John Harrison Craner, also of Oakley, Idaho, on December 28, 1887 in Logan, Utah.

Noble, Joseph Bates Washburn, Jr.

Noble, Joseph Bates Washburn, Jr.
Springville, Utah US

Joseph and MaryEtte Noble

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Joseph Noble. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Joseph Noble, Training School, 1881-1884. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Bates Washburn Noble was born on October 10, 1853 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were Washburn Bates Noble and Mary Ann Washburn Noble. [Although his name is not exactly like his father's name, he is often listed as "Jr."] Joseph married MaryEtte (Mariette) Curtis on March 10, 1873 in Salt Lake City, Utah. MaryEtte was born on January 16, 1858 in Nephi, Utah. Her parents were listed as Enos Curtis And Tamma Durfee [in another place the father is listed as John White Curtis]. MaryEtte Noble died on January 2, 1930 in Provo, Utah. Her interment, Springville, Utah. Joseph W. Noble died on July 11, 1921 in Springville, Utah [stomach trouble]. His interment, Springville City Cemetery.

Rees, Hannah Williams

Rees, Hannah Williams
Wales, Utah US

Hannah and Peter Anderson

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Hannah Rees. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course -- Certificate for Primary Teaching. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Hannah Williams Rees was born on April 13, 1860 in Wales, Sanpete County, Utah. Her parents were John Evans Rees and Mary Williams Rees. She married Peter Christian Anderson on December 27, 1886 in Wales, Utah. Hannah Rees Anderson died on June 18, 1937 in Wales, Utah, at the age of 77. Her interment, Wales, Utah.

Shepherd, Sadie [Sarah Caroline]

Shepherd, Sadie [Sarah Caroline]
Provo, Utah US

Sadie and Reinhard Maeser

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Sadie Shepherd. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Sadie Shepherd Maeser, Training School, 1879-1884. Sarah Caroline "Sadie" Shepherd was born on July 5, 1860 in Beaver Utah. Her parents were Marquis (Marcus) De La Fayette Shepherd and Harriett Parrish Shepherd. Sadie married Reinhard [Karl Frederick Reinhard] Maeser on June 16, 1882 in St. George, Utah. Sadie Maeser died on February 5, 1944 in Pleasant View, Utah, while normally residing in Provo, Utah. She was listed as a housewife, with her husband predeceasing her. Her interment, Provo, Utah.

Sutherland, George [Alexander George]

Sutherland, George [Alexander George]
Washington, D.C. US

George and Rosamond Sutherland

Class of 1881. George Sutherland was born in England on March 15, 1862. His parents, Alexander George Sutherland and Frances Slater Sutherland, joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and moved to Utah when Sutherland was a child. His name was the same as his father's, but on coming of age he dropped "Alexander". The Sutherland family became disaffected from the Mormon Church. After attending Brigham Young High School and Academy, Sutherland attended the University of Michigan Law School, where he was taught by the 19th century constitutional law scholar Thomas M. Cooley. George married Rosamond Lee. Sutherland returned to Utah in 1883, and practiced law first with his father in Provo, and then with others in Salt Lake City. Sutherland was a member of the Utah Territorial Legislature, and a State Senator from 1896-1900. He then was elected to the House of Representatives. In 1905, Sutherland was appointed by the Utah Legislature to the Senate, where he served two terms. In 1922, President Warren G. Harding nominated Sutherland to the Supreme Court. Sutherland strongly believed individuals possessed natural rights with which the state was forbidden to interfere, but his opinions suggest an inconsistent position on these matters. For example, Sutherland dissented without opinion in Meyer v. Nebraska, which held that the state was not permitted to bar the teaching of German in private schools. The Court relied on the right of parents to raise their children largely as they chose, a classic effort at using natural rights views to declare unconstitutional state regulation. Because he did not write an opinion, we do not know why Sutherland dissented in Meyer. The only other dissenter was Oliver Wendell Holmes, who regularly sustained such state legislation. That same year, Sutherland wrote the opinion of the Court in Adkins v. Childrens Hospital, which held unconstitutional a law establishing a minimum wage for women in the District of Columbia (a law which had been upheld in Muller v. Oregon). The opinion in Adkins relies on a notion of natural rights regarding "liberty of contract." While a legislator in Utah, Sutherland supported a maximum hour regulation for miners, which the Court upheld in Holden v. Hardy (1898). For Sutherland, there existed a distinction between minimum wages and maximum hours, a distinction rejected by most. In 1925, Sutherland joined the unanimous opinion of the Court in Pierce v. Society of Sisters, which was based on the principles stated in Meyer. He did not write an opinion explaining whether he was merely acquiescing to the precedent created by his brethren in Meyer, or for some other reason. Sutherland also wrote the Court's opinion permitted zoning regulations in Euclid v. Ambler Realty against a property right challenge in 1926. He dissented in Home Building & Loan Ass'n v. Blaisdell (1934), which permitted Minnesota to adopt a mortgage redemption moratorium period during the Great Depression, on property rights grounds. During the Great Depression, Sutherland was considered the leader of the Four Horsemen (Pierce Butler, James McReynolds and Willis Van Devanter were the others) preventing implementation of the New Deal during the mid-1930s. The demonizing of these members of the Court (the legendary Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse were Death, Famine, Pestilence and War) was part of the Progressive effort to reverse the decisions of this "anti-New Deal" Court. Even though FDR's court-packing plan (see bio for Charles Evans Hughes) failed to pass, the Court did change its mind, and the members of the Court opposed to the New Deal began to leave the Court after the constitutional crisis of 1937. Sutherland was a bright, hard-working judge whose fate was to be linked to other Justices whose reactionary politics or racist beliefs are anathema. Sutherland retired from the Court on January 17, 1938. He died on July 18, 1942. ~ ~ ~ ~ Born in England, Sutherland lost his first election for public office when he failed in his bid for mayor of Provo in 1892. Thereafter, however, he notched several political victories: Utah State Senate (1896), U.S. House of Representatives (1900), and finally to the U.S. Senate (1904). Sutherland, who helped found the Utah State Bar, sat on the U.S. Supreme Court from 1922-38.

Vance, Angus [Joseph Angus]

Vance, Angus [Joseph Angus]
Brigham City, Utah US

Angus and Emma Vance

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Angus Vance. Commercial. Certificate in Arithmetic, 1881. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Angus Vance, Training School & Arithmetic teacher, 1881-1890. ~ ~ ~ ~ Joseph Angus Vance was born on September 12, 1861 in Alpine City, Utah County, Utah. His parents were John Wesley Vance and Angelia Vail Vance. He married Emma Laurine Yearsley on June 4, 1890 in Logan, Utah. He died on October 8, 1912 in Brigham City, Utah. His interment, Brigham City, Utah.

Wilson, Elmira

Wilson, Elmira
Payson, Utah US

Elmira Wilson

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Elmira Wilson. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff. Elmira Wilson, Training School, 1881-1884. ~ ~ ~ ~ Elmira Wilson was born on January 17, 1861 in Payson, Utah. Her parents were David Carlton Wilson and Rachel Priscilla Loveless Wilson. It is probable that she did not marry. Elmira Wilson died on April 26, 1897 at the age of 36. Her interment, Payson, Utah. She is buried as Elmira Wilson.