Alphabetical Alumni

Kanahele, Kauana
[Last known address]
55-127 Naupaka St.
Laie, Hawaii 96762-1130 US

Kauana and Leroy Pukahi
  • Work: (808) 293-2181

Class of 1952. Kauana Kanahele. Chorus. Married Leroy Pukahi. Kauana Kanahele Pukahi, Laie, Hawaii, has three daughters and two grandchildren. She still has a beautiful singing voice. Her parents: Clinton J. Kanahele, and Agnes Sanford Kanahele, both deceased. Children of Clinton J. Kanahele, Sr., and Agnes Sanford Kanahele: Six sons: Clinton Joshua Kanahele, Jr., Daniel Kelii Kanahele, George Kanahele, Albert Kanahele, Ashley Kanahele and Henry Kanahele; Seven daughters: Winona Kanahele Jensen, Thelma Kanahele Sorensen, Eleanor Kanahele Locey, Ruth [Leialoha] Kanahele Iversen, Abigail [Jamsie]Kanahele Lindholm, Laura Kanahele Keawe-Aiko [or Aiko], and Kauana Kanahele Pukahi. [Note: Do not confuse Kauana Kanahele Pukahi with Kauana Kanahele Jackson of Henderson, Nevada, a niece of the Kauana Kanahele of BYH.]

Karren, Thomas A.
PO Box 35
24 E 1st Ave S
Magrath, Alberta, Canada T0K 1J0 CA

Tom & Joan Karren
  • Work: (403) 758-3473

Class of 1950. Tom Karren. Member of the State Championship Basketball team of 1948-1949 & 1949-1950, Baseball, Football, Junior Class President, Chorus, Lettermen. A member of the Canadian contingent at BYH. He played on the varsity BYU Basketball Team. BYU BA 1954. He married Joan Blumell, daughter of James Elton Blumell and Mary Margaret Ririe Blumell. They live in Magrath, Alberta, Canada, where the city gymnasium is named Tom Karren Gym.

Kartchner, Alma

Alma Kartchner

Class of 1927. Alma Kartchner. He is pictured with the BYH Class of 1927 in the BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. ~ ~ ~ ~ The Kartchner children grew up in Provo with their widowed mother, Rose Heath Kartchner. The children included: Ray, Alma, Ethel, Ruth, and Fred. Their father, Asael Wain Kartchner, died when the children were young. Growing up during hard economic times taught them to work hard, to be resourceful, to persevere, to seek education, and to be very frugal. In Provo of the 1920's, the boys grew up skinny dipping with their pals in the Provo River, picking raspberries and peaches on their Uncle's farm on the Orem bench, working one odd job after another to earn a little extra cash, hiking Timp every summer and some of the boys hopped freights to Wyoming and back. The children pursued their educations and had families.

Kartchner, Ethel

Kartchner, Ethel
Provo, Utah US

Ethel and Delbert Kartchner

Class of 1925. Ethel Kartchner. Source 1: 1925 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1925. Ethel Kartchner. She graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1925. Source: Class Roll in the program of Closing Exercises of the Senior High School Class, Brigham Young University, 1925. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ethel Kartchner's parents: Asael Wain Kartchner, who died at the age of 33 in 1915, and Rose Heath Kartchner, who raised her five children as a single mother. Their children included two girls and three boys: Ethel Kartchner [BYH Class of 1925] [1907-1978], of Provo, Utah [married Delbert Van Tregeagle]; Alma H. Kartchner, Palo Alto, California [married ______ Larsen]; Dr. Ruth Kartchner [1911-1998] [PhD, pioneer in Special Education] of Provo and Salt Lake City [married Marion E. Hammond]; Ray W. Kartchner, of Bountiful, Utah [married ______ Skousen]; and Dr. Fred D. Kartchner [BYH Class of 1932 or 1933?] [1914-1980], of Provo, Utah [married Ruth Elaine Taylor]. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ethel Kartchner was born on October 11, 1907 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Asael Wain Kartchner and Rosenea Heath Kartchner. She married Delbert Van Tregeagle on August 18, 1926 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Delbert was born on June 19, 1904 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His parents were James Eli Tregeagle and Bertena Brown Tregeagle. He died on April 20, 1979 in Provo, Utah. Ethel Kartchner Tregeagle died on April 1, 1978 in Provo, Utah.

Kartchner, Floy

Kartchner, Floy
Mesa, Arizona US

Floy and Max Sadler

Class of 1914. Floy Kartchner. She received a BYH Art & Manual Training Diploma in 1914. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 7, page 474. ~ ~ ~ ~ Floy Kartchner was born on April 16, 1886 in Snowflake, Navajo County, Arizona. Her parents were Nowlin Decator Karchner and Margaret Emma Savage Kartchner. Floy married Micajah (Max) Sadler on June 3, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Floy Kartchner Sadler died on November 11, 1976 in Mesa, Arizona.

Kartchner, Fred Dixon

Kartchner, Fred Dixon
Provo, Utah US

Fred and Ruth Kartchner

Class of 1932. Fred Kartchner. Graduated from Brigham Young High School on Thursday, June 2, 1932. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, Wednesday, June 1, 1932. ~ ~ ~ ~ Fred Kartchner played a part in the annual BYH play, "The Youngest", presented in College Hall on December 12, 1930. He was a member of the BYH Debate Team during the 1930-1931 school year. Source: BYU Banyan 1931. ~ ~ His parents: Asael Wain Kartchner, who died at the age of 33 in 1915, and Rose Heath Kartchner, who raised her five children as a single mother. Their children included two girls and three boys: Ethel Kartchner [BYH Class of 1925] [1907-1978] , of Provo, Utah [married Delbert Van Tregeagle]; Alma H. Kartchner, Palo Alto, California [married ______ Larsen]; Dr. Ruth Kartchner [1911-1998] [PhD, pioneer in Special Education] of Provo and Salt Lake City [married Marion E. Hammond]; Ray W. Kartchner, of Bountiful, Utah [married ______ Skousen]; and Dr. Fred D. Kartchner [BYH Class of 1932] [1914-1980], of Provo, Utah [married Ruth Elaine Taylor]. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Fred Dixon Kartchner was born on December 6, 1914 in Provo, Utah. His parents were Asael Wain Kartchner and Resenea Heath Kartchner. Fred graduated from Brigham Young High School in the Class of 1932. He did his first two years of medical school at the University of Utah, then finished up at the School of Medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver. He married Ruth Elaine Taylor, daughter of Arthur Nicholls Taylor and Maria Louise Dixon Taylor. Dr. Fred Kartchner died on March 16, 1980 in Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Ruth Elaine Taylor Kartchner died, 20 October 2015, after a fall at home. Born March 20, 1917, in Provo, Utah, eighth and last child of Arthur Nicholls and Maria Dixon Taylor. Married Fred D. Kartchner on June 8, 1942; they had eight children: Linda, (Steven) Tyler, Kenneth, (Marianne Davis), Elaine, 4 months (died 1945), Ellen (Rand) Farrer, Richard (Katherine Andersen), David (Joyce Martell), Rosena (Alan) Heal, Mary Ann (Jan) Alley. Preceded in death by her husband (March 16, 1980) and all her brothers and sister: Arthur, Lynn, Elton, Henry, Alice Nelson, Clarence, Kenneth. She was the grandmother of 37 and great-grandmother of 89. “Ruthie” grew up on 5th West in Provo, amongst aunts and uncles, cousins and friends in the Provo 3rd Ward. The “gang” slid down the irrigation ditch in the summer, strapped on roller skates to enjoy Highway 89 when it was first paved, and enjoyed childhood freedom in a Provo that has passed into history. She spent summers at Wildwood in Provo Canyon in a cabin her parents had built, and later with Fred in their own summer home, an anchor for the LDS branch primary and Relief Society. She saw Fred through the last years of medical school at the University of Utah and joined him in Hawaii after VJ day with their first two children and Fred’s mother, Rosenea. In 1950 they made their home in the Provo 5th Ward where Ruth was the Primary President and mother of a growing family. In 1958 they built a home in Oak Hills where she remained until her death. Faithful and active throughout her life, Ruth was an indefatigable Guide Patrol leader in both the Provo 5th and Oak Hills wards, a Laurel leader, in 2014, participated in the Provo Freedom 5K Run/Walk, and in her 80’s was a Primary teacher. She gave compassionate service to any in need longer than anyone can remember. She walked 2 miles on foothill roads every weekday until just recently. Her posterity and two generations of children in Oak Hills knew there would always be a smile, a hug, and an Oreo cookie at Grandma Kartchner’s. In 1991 she wrote her history, available online at https://archive.org/stream/withpeacefulfait00kart#page/18/mode/2up. It is appropriately titled, “With Peaceful Faith, Cheer Me on My Way.” We do . . . because of the incomparable example she set. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Friday, November 6, 2015 at the Oak Hills 6th Ward Chapel, 1960 North 1500 East, Provo, Utah. Friends may call at the Berg Mortuary of Provo, 185 East Center Street, Thursday, November 5, from 6-8 p.m. and at the church Friday from 9:30–10:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment will be in the Provo City Cemetery. Condolences may be extended to the family at www.bergmortuary.com. [Provo Daily Herald, November 1, 2015]

Kartchner, James Anderson

Kartchner, James Anderson
St. David, Arizona US

James and Lois Kartchner

Class of 1919. James Kartchner graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1926. James A. Kartchner. He received a BS Degree in Horticulture in 1926. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 322. ~ ~ ~ ~ James Anderson Kartchner, educator and rancher, of St. David, Arizona, was born on January 19, 1901, in Provo, Utah. His parents were Mark Elisha Kartchner and Ellen Matilda Loveless. ~ ~ ~ ~ He married twice: first, to Harriet Marie Adams who was born on October 9, 1904 in Logan, Utah [or Newmarket, Flint, Wales]. Her parents were John Quincy Adams and Armenia Julia Parry Adams. She married James A. Kartchner on June 6, 1928 in Logan, Utah. She died less than one year later on April 5, 1929, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Her interment, Logan, Utah. ~ ~ James A. Karchner second married Lois Martineau on June 3, 1930, in Colonia, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lois was born on September 27, 1910 in Garcia, Chihuahua, Mexico. Lois was the daughter of Charles Henry Martineau and Florence Whetten. She died on November 3, 2001. James A. Kartchner died on June 12, 1986. ~ ~ ~ ~ James A. Kartchner was the owner of the property where, in 1974, large caverns were discovered, which in 1988 became Kartchner Caverns State Park. James Kartchner may have been the first to notice something a little unusual about the hills containing the cave that now bears his name. Kartchner was an educator and a rancher in St. David, a small town east of the Whetstone Mountains, in southeastern Arizona. Whenever he and his sons would ride the hills to check on their cattle, their horses' hoofs made a peculiar sound on the limestone rock. "You know," Kartchner commented to his sons, "it sounds like these hills are hollow." Kartchner had bought land in the Whetstones, about 40 miles southeast of Tucson, in 1942. It would be another 32 years before he or anyone else would discover just how hollow the hills were. Various spelunkers, amateur cave explorers, had poked around the Whetstones hoping to find a new cave. Cavers look for certain telltale clues. If the area contains limestone, it may also contain caves because limestone dissolves when water seeps through it, forming underground cavities. Sinkholes are another good sign. A sinkhole is a depression in the ground created when these cavities collapse. The Whetstones have the most extensive limestone deposits in southern Arizona and are riddled with sinkholes. But until 1974 no one had ever found a cave worth talking about. In the many years since 1978, when Randy Tufts and Gary Tenen, the two college students who discovered the caves, first approached James Kartchner in his front yard, they have repeatedly commented on the cave's good fortune to remain unknown until it could be protected. More precious to them than gold was their 1974 discovery of an untouched natural treasure, a living cave with growing calcite formations, hidden under the desert floor for more than a million years. James Kartchner had been a science teacher and the superintendent of schools in St. David. He and his wife, Lois, had 10 children of their own and two that they adopted. Six of their children are medical doctors, and one has a Ph.D. They quickly realized James Kartchner was at least as interested in geology and related matters as they were. When Kartchner was 78, he and five of his sons accompanied Tufts and Tenen on a tour of the cave in 1979. "We were in complete disbelief at the size and beauty of it," said Max Kartchner, an anesthesiologist who lives in Benson. "It was almost a sacred experience, so exquisite and out of this world." Finally, in 1984, Tufts and Tenen decided that maybe the state of Arizona would be interested in purchasing the site to develop it as a state park. The discoverers approached Governor Bruce Babbitt. The governor was interested, but wanted to see the cave for himself. Babbitt, who had a background in geology before he became a lawyer, toured the cave in April 1985. He brought along his sons, Chris, 10, and T.J., 8, first making them promise they would keep it a secret. He also lectured them on not touching anything and following directions carefully. Impressed with what he saw, Babbitt threw his support behind the clandestine movement to get the cave into public ownership. It took three more years, two more governors, two more state parks directors, and some tense, behind-the-scenes political maneuvering, before the state finally bought the cave. Everyone involved was so consumed with the need for secrecy that State Parks Director Ken Travous asked legislative leaders to write a bill authorizing the cave's purchase but to obscure the bill's language so that no one would know exactly what was being purchased until the day of the vote. The Kartchners sold 550 acres above and around the caverns to the state, creating a new park where environmental awareness and preservation, rather than recreation, were the key elements. The Kartchners, who had owned the ranch since 1941, couldn't have anticipated that the development and commercialization of the cave would cost more than $28 million. Kartchner Caverns became a state park so that it could be preserved and protected and used as a living classroom where the public could learn something about earth sciences and the fragile life of a cave environment. "But," asks Tufts, "what is the key point about Kartchner? Not that it is beautiful nor that it will spur growth in Benson, but the fact that it is in excellent condition and is being kept that way for posterity. That's why it's attractive." ~ ~ ~ ~ On June 12, 1986, James Anderson Kartchner died at the age of 85.

Kartchner, Jesse Cecil

Kartchner, Jesse Cecil

Jesse and Hazel Kartchner

Class of 1918. Jesse Cecil Kartchner. Academic Department. He graduated Monday Evening, May 27, 1918. Source 1: 1918 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Second source: 1918 BYU Banyan, High School section, pages 60-79. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1918. Jesse Kartchner. He received a High School Diploma in 1918. Source 3: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 28. ~ ~ ~ ~ He was born July 11, 1899 on the Provo Bench (now Orem, Utah). His parents: Mark Elisha Kartchner & Phoebe Palmer Kartchner. Jesse lived for a time in Montana. Jesse married Hazel Bunker on June 1, 1923 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died April 14, 1989.

Kartchner, Lucele
1161 Holly Circle
Provo, Utah 84604-3600 US

Lucele Christiansen
  • Work: (801) 375-4289

Class of 1944. Lucele Kartchner. Married _____ Christiansen. @2001

Kartchner, Lyman Alma

Kartchner, Lyman Alma
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Lyman Kartchner

Class of 1917. Lyman Kartchner. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lyman Alma Kartchner was born on March 17, 1897 in Provo, Utah. His parents were Mark Elisha Kartchner and Phoebe Palmer. He married Lois Ione Beveridge on October 21, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was the daughter of Alexander Beveridge and Mabel Ione Brough Beveridge. She died on October 5, 1980. Lyman Alma Kartchner died on July 29 [or 28, according to cemetery record], 1975 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Kartchner, Rachel

Kartchner, Rachel

Rachel Kartchner

Class of 1916. Rachel Kartchner. She received a BYH Normal Certificate in 1916. Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 7, page 127.

Kartchner, Ruth

Ruth Kartchner

Class of 1930. Ruth Kartchner. Graduated from Brigham Young High School on Thursday, May 29, 1930. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, May 28, 1930.

Kartchner, Veda Faye

Kartchner, Veda Faye
Logan, Utah US

Veda and Alma Dittmer

Class of 1928. Veda Kartchner. Graduated from Brigham Young High School on Thursday, May 24, 1928. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, May 23, 1928. ~ ~ ~ ~ Veda Faye Kartchner Dittmer. Veda was born May 27, 1910 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Mark Elisha Kartchner and Ellen Matilda Loveless Kartchner. Veda married Alma August Dittmer (1908-1980), and they were sealed May 31, 1938. Veda Dittmer died on January 16, 1980 in North Logan, Utah. Her interment, Logan City Cemetery, Logan, Utah.

Kartchner, Virgil

Kartchner, Virgil
Provo, Utah US

Virgil Kartchner

Class of 1925. Virgil Kartchner. Virgil Kartchner received his secondary education at BYH, and he is listed as a 4th Year (senior) student in the BYH Class of 1925. Background sources: BYU/BYH Annual Catalogues for the School Years 1923-24, 1924-25, and 1925-26. ~ ~ ~ ~ He graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1925. Source: Class Roll in the program of Closing Exercises of the Senior High School Class, Brigham Young University, 1925.

Kartchner, Wayne E.

Kartchner, Wayne E.

Wayne Kartchner

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1927. Wayne E. Kartchner. He received an A.B. Degree in Geology in 1927. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 278.

Katzenbach, Jon
125 Tradd Street
Charleston, South Carolina 29401-2419 US

Jon Katzenbach
  • Work: (843) 534-0630
  • Home: (843) 534-2026

Class of 1950. Jon Katzenbach. Student Body President. Thespians, Band, Photography Club, Childrens Theatre. ~ ~ ~ ~ Also: Jon Katzenbach, 2240 Catesbys Bluff, Seabrook Island, SC 29455-6037 (843) 243-9312 ~ ~ ~ ~ Jon Katzenbach, Senior Partner, Katzenbach Partners LCC, New York, New York. Teams work when they are created for the right reasons, and when they are created in the right way. The organization that I think does the best job of meeting these requirements is the U.S. Marine Corps. Most people think of the USMC as a command-and-control organization. But when they put a team together, it is in the right place for the right reasons. The corps is extremely disciplined about assessing whether it really needs a team for the task at hand. The notion that a team is always better is misleading, yet all too often, that is the path that managers choose. The critical decision for any manager or leader who wants to get higher performance from a small group of people is determining whether the group should try to work as a team, or whether they should be satisfied with what I call "single-leader unit" discipline. Single-leader units are intrinsically faster and more efficient than teams. Tasks are more clearly defined by one leader, and members work on their own much of the time. Most organizations proliferate with groups that call themselves teams but are not. It is too common for single-leader units to be labeled as teams, and it is disturbing how many managers and leaders assume that being a team is what a group effort is all about. That is a confusing, frustrating, and costly assumption. And it causes big problems in the workplace. If a group tries to become a team when the performance challenge requires a single-leader approach, performance and morale suffer. The opposite is equally true. In fact, both miscues produce the dreaded "compromise-unit syndrome": weak leadership, low levels of commitment, wasted time, and poor performance results. Jon Katzenbach (jon.katzenbach@katzenbach.com) is a senior partner at Katzenbach Partners LLC, a New York-based firm that specializes in leadership, team, workforce, and organization performance. He has written Peak Performance: Aligning the Hearts and Minds of Your Employees (Harvard Business School Press, 2000); Teams at the Top: Unleashing the Potential of Both Teams and Individual Leaders (Harvard Business School Press, 1998); The Wisdom of Teams: Creating the High-Performance Organization (with coauthor Douglas Smith) (Harper Business, 1994); and Real Change Leaders: How You Can Create Growth and High Performance at Your Company (with the RCL team, Frederick Beckett, et al.) (Times Business, 1995).

Kawagashi, Maydel
1228 E. Hemingway Dr.
Salt Lake City, Utah 84121 US

Maydel and Edward Louie
  • Work: 801-262-7514

Class of 1956 ~ Honorary. Maydel Kawagashi [or Kawahgashi, or Kawahigashi]. She attended BYH during the 1953-1954 and 1954-1955 school years. She graduated in 1956 from high school at Kamehameha in Hawaii. She attended LDS Church College, Laie, Hawaii 1956-1957, and LDS Business College, Salt Lake City, Utah 1957-1958 – Graduated. Maydel married Edward W. Louie, 1961, in Salt Lake City, Utah. Edward passed away in 1976. Their two children were, daughter, Maile, lives in Florida and son, Ryune, lives in Cleveland, Ohio. Maydel's employment includes Deseret Book Company – sales, secretary 1958-1960. Walker Bank – secretary, cashier 1960-1963. Zion's Bank – secretary, marketing, corporate officer 1978-1994. "I took early retirement in 1994 and, to date, I'm doing mostly what I want when I want. Enjoy doing nothing as retirees can do. I visit Hawaii yearly as we have a summer and winter home at Laie. I spend time with classmates from Kamehameha every year and meet two times a year in Las Vegas, Nevada. For several years, I have been involved in some humanitarian service at the Deseret Industries." @2006

Kay, Lee Partington

Kay, Lee Partington
Salt Lake City, Utah US

Lee and Leah Kay

Class of 1917. Lee Kay (male). Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Lee Partington Kay was born on March 27, 1897 in Mona, Juab County, Utah [or Moab, Grand County, Utah]. His parents were George Edward Kay and Elizabeth Partington. He married Leah Murdock on July 21, 1920 in Manti, Utah. He died on May 4, 1980 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Heber City, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Utah Fish & Game employee. The Lee Kay ponds are hunting areas near Mona, Utah. The Lee Kay Center in Salt Lake is a hunter education center.

Kay, Lester [Thomas Lester]

Kay, Lester [Thomas Lester]
Mona, Utah US

Lester Kay

Class of 1917. Lester Kay (male). Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1917. Source: 1917 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, pages 82-88. ~ ~ ~ ~ Thomas Lester Kay was born on October 22, 1896 in Mona, Juab County, Utah. His parents were James William Kay and Mary Elizabeth Kay Kay (sic). Thomas Lester Kay of Mona, Utah, was drafted into the military in August 1918. ~ ~ ~ Thomas Lester Kay died on June 13, 1956. ~ ~ ~ ~ His interment, Mona City Cemetery, Juab County, Utah.

Kay, Lu

Kay, Lu

Lu Kay

Class of 1918. Lu Kay. Received a BYH Normal Certificate in 1918. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 380.

Kay, Rheta

Kay, Rheta
Provo, Utah US

Rheta and Paul Stewart

Class of 1923. Rheta Kay [Stewart]. She received a BYH Normal Degree in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 442. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1928. Rheta Kay [Stewart]. She received a BS Degree in Elementary Education in 1928. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 442. ~ ~ ~ ~ Rheta Kay was born on May 21, 1904 in Santaquin, Utah. Her parents were Ephraim H. Kay and Emma Ellen Openshaw Kay. Rheta married Paul Barrett Stewart on January 23, 1942 in Provo, Utah. Rheta Kay Stewart died on December 13, 1986 in Provo, Utah.

Kay, Sherman Ross

Kay, Sherman Ross
Dayton, Nevada US

Sherman & Carol Kay

Class of 1955~H. Sherman Kay. Attended BYH 1952-53 and 1953-54. Football, Basketball, Track. He married Carol Wade, BYH Class of 1956. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Sherman Ross Kay of Provo, Utah died December 9, 2005, in Dayton, Nevada where he was living with his wife Carole Linda Wade Kay. Death resulted from head injuries. The accidental fall occurred at home after returning from his doctors’ appointment. Sherman is survived by sons Bart Kay and Brent Kay. Bart Kay lives in Sunnyvale, California. Brent Kay lives in Dayton, Nevada with his wife, Amanda, their three children Liam, Noah and Meredith Kay. Sherman is the son of Levi Ross Kay and Grace Bills Kay of Provo, Utah. Also surviving is Sherman's brother, Chuck Kay, living in Provo, Utah. Sherm especially loved his Aunt Rita Stewart and Rita’s daughter, Patricia Dixon. Sherm was an honorary member of the Brigham Young High School Class of 1955. A memorial service was held on Friday, December 16, 2005 at Northern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, Fernley, Nevada. An Air Force Honor Guard provided military honors. [Provo Daily Herald - December 16, 2005]. ~ ~ ~ ~ The Sherman family lived in Sunnyvale, California for twenty years. Carole was employed as a senior buyer at a major electronics company for fifteen years. It was very fast paced and stressful, so they moved to Nevada in the early nineties. Carole worked as an expert shipping manager at an industrial hose reel company in Dayton, Nevada for five years. After that Sherman fell ill with strokes, fibromyglacia, and a number of other ailments. Carole cared for him until he died. @2006 ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Carole Linda Wade Kay, 74, died May 15, 2013 in Reno, Nevada due to a brain aneurysm. Carole was born April 13, 1939 in Inglewood, California to Edward Boone and Dorothy Mae Lee Wade. She married Sherman Ross Kay April 23, 1960 in Provo, Utah. Sherm died December 9, 2005 in Dayton, Nevada and is interred at the Veterans National Cemetery Fernley, Nevada. Carole graduated from Brigham Young High School with the Class of 1956 where she made many dear and life long friends. Her years at BYH were very special to her. Carole was predeceased by her parents and husband. She is survived by sons Bart of San Jose, California and Brent (Amanda) of Dayton, Nevada; three grandchildren, Liam St. John Kay, Meredith Leigh Kay, Noah Ronan Kay; and sister, Bonnie Lee Wade Lillywhite, of St. George , Utah. Services are pending and will be posted when available. [May 17, 2013]

Kearl, Shirlee

Shirlee Kearl

Class of 1945. Shirlee Kearl.

Kearns, Dora

Kearns, Dora

Dora Kearns

Class of 1914. Dora Kearns. She received a BYH Special Certificate in Arts Supervision (2 years) in 1914. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 8, page 128.

Keate, Ida

Keate, Ida
Los Angeles, California US

Ida and Rawl Callaway

BY Academy High School Class of 1881. Ida Keate. Diploma in the Normal (teaching) course. Source: The Territorial Enquirer, June 22, 1881, Provo, Utah. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ida Keate was born on September 23, 1862 in St. George, Utah. Her parents were James Keate and Bena Christina Christofersen [or Jacobine Christina Christoffersen] Keate. Ida married Samuel Rollo [Rawl] Callaway in 1888 in St. George, Utah. Samuel Rollo Callaway was born on January 23, 1863 in Manti, Utah. Rawl's parents were Levi Hamilton Callaway and Mary Frances Vanburen. Rawl Callaway died on July 31, 1939 in Los Angeles, California. His interment, Los Angeles, California. Ida died on January 12, 1950 in Los Angeles, California. Her interment, Valhalla Cemetery, Los Angeles, California. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ BRIEF BIO: Samuel Rollo Callaway born January 23, 1863 in Manti, Sanpete County, Utah. He was listed as a miner on the 1910 Utah census. He married Ida Keate in 1888. Ida's father was born in England, and her mother was born in Denmark. They had five children, two daughters and three sons: daughter Georgia Callaway was born 1889 in Utah; son A. Walter Callaway was born 1891 in Utah; daughter Nevada Callaway was born 1895 in Utah; son Sheldon K. Callaway was born 1901 in Utah; and son Robert Cecil Callaway was born 1903 in Utah. By 1920 they had moved to Los Angeles, California. Their daughter, Nevada, was a stenographer for a moving pictures company in Los Angeles. Ida and Samuel were separated by 1920, and divorced by 1930. Samuel died in Los Angeles, California on July 31, 1939. Source: Callaway Family Association Blog, Friday, August 13, 2004

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