Alphabetical Alumni
Davies, Bessie M.

Davies, Bessie M.

Bessie Davies

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1930. Bessie M. Davies. She received a BS Degree in Clothing in 1930. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 262.

Davies, Charles H.

Davies, Charles H.

Charles Davies

Collegiate Grads of BYU, Class of 1924. Charles H. Davies. He received a BS Degree in 1924. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 5, page 378.

Davies, Grant William
15704 SW 87th Ave.
Tigard, Oregon 97224-5682 US

Grant and Diana Kay Davies
  • Work: 503-684-0842

Class of 1956. Grant W. Davies. Football, Basketball, Track, Baseball, Lettermen, Interpretive Speech, French Club, Gun Club, Band, Chorus. He married Diana Kay Kirby. ~ ~ ~ ~ Grant grew up in Helper, Utah and attended school there through the tenth grade. While in Helper he lettered in football, basketball, track, and baseball. He was also sports editor of the school newspaper. Upon moving to Provo, he followed the recommendation of his football coach and enrolled at BY High. At BY High he also lettered in football, basketball, track and baseball. He most fondly remembers his senior year’s track team experiences. He participated in the "medley relay", an event in which the first runner ran 100 yards, the second ran 220 yards, the third ran 440 yards, and the final runner ran 880 yards. Grant ran the final leg, the 880 yards. He says that the team ran in five invitational meets that year and set meet records in four of those meets. Immediately upon graduation from BYH, Grant attended BYU for his freshman year. The next October (1957 through 1959) he was called on a mission to the Southern California Mission. Today there are nine missions serving the areas he labored in. After his mission, he returned to BYU. He worked in the BYU Bookstore where he became the "student assistant to the controller" his junior and senior years. He earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education and Math in 1964. He continued his schooling and graduated with a Master’s Degree in Physical Education and School Administration in 1965. That year he signed a contract to teach physical education and be the intramural director at Portland Community College in Portland, Oregon. Grant taught at PCC for thirty years, retiring from full-time teaching in 1995. During his years at PCC, Grant was an interim department chairman, coached various school teams (softball for 24 years, men’s and women’s bowling for 22 years, men’s and women’s volleyball for 15 years.) His teams won many conference and regional championships over those years. He is currently teaching Adult Fitness on a part-time basis. Grant married Diana Kay Kirby in 1968. She was a graduate of Utah State University, which has proved interesting talk in their home whenever BYU - USU played each other. They adopted five children, three born in Portland and two born in Thailand. They feel the Lord had a hand in bringing each child into their home. In one son’s patriarchal blessing he was told that he chose this family but that he had to come to them in a different way (this was one born in Thailand). Grant and Kay now have eleven grandchildren. Six are boys under the age of three years old. They see them often, and fortunately not all at once. Grant has held various positions in the Church. He is currently the High Priest Group Leader in his ward in Tigard, Oregon. @2006

Davies, Madeline

Madeline Davies

Class of 1928. Madeline Davies. Graduated from Brigham Young High School on Thursday, May 24, 1928. Source: The Evening Herald, Provo, Utah, May 23, 1928.

Davies, Rita M.

Davies, Rita M.

Rita Davies

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1930. Rita M. Davies. She received a BS Degree in Secondary Teaching in 1930. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 148.

Davies, Ruth

Davies, Ruth
Orem, Utah US

Ruth and Charles Sessions

Classes of 1919 and 1920. Ruth Davies. She graduated from BYH in College Hall on Wednesday, May 28, 1919. Source 1: 1919 Graduation Program. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1919. Ruth Davies ['Dession' - actually Sessions]. She received a BYH Academic Diploma in 1919. Source 2: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 320. ~ ~ ~ ~ Class of 1920. Ruth Davies [Sessions - not Dession]. She received a BYH Normal Certificate in 1920. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 320. ~ ~ ~ ~ Ruth Davies Sessions was born March 31, 1901 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were Charles Edwin Davies & Rachel Emer Davis Davies. Ruth married Charles David Sessions. Ruth Davies Sessions died on May 7, 1992 in Provo, Utah. Her interment, Provo City Cemetery, Utah.

Davies, Vivia Louise

Davies, Vivia Louise
Provo, Utah US

Vivia and Charles Johnson

Class of 1939. Vivia Davies. Orchestra. Girls' Glee Club. Notre Maison. French Club. Opera. ~ ~ ~ ~ HER OBITUARY: Vivia Louise Davies Johnson, 78, passed away on Sept. 28, 1999, in the Utah Valley Regional Medical Center, Provo, Utah, from complications associated with heart failure. She was born Jan. 19, 1921, in Provo to Charles Hyrum Davies and Charlotte Marie Bush. She grew up on a farm where her home is still located. Her mother instilled a love of handwork, such as crocheting and knitting, which she did professionally in her later years. She attended Lincoln Grade School, Lincoln Junior High, Brigham Young High School and Brigham Young University. Music was an important part of her life. She played the cello in school orchestras, the BYU Symphony Orchestra and numerous string quartets. She began piano lessons at an early age and was an organist or pianist for church meetings most of her life. Other ardent interests included gardening, canning, traveling and caring for the needs of her family. She was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In addition to her music positions, she was a teacher and visiting teacher. One of her cherished callings was as a worker in the Provo Temple. She married Charles F. Johnson on May 3, 1940, in Nephi, Utah. Their marriage was solemnized in the Provo LDS Temple in 1989. He preceded her in death on Jan. 31, 1987. She is survived by sons: David (Barbara) Johnson, Draper, Utah; Daniel (Bonnie) Johnson of Springerville, Ariz.; Michael Johnson, Provo; and daughters: Annette Willey, Farmington, Utah; Patricia (John) Hendrix, Orem; and Charlotte Johnson, Provo; 16 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren; and a sister, Afton Atkinson. She was preceded in death by her husband, parents, three brothers, five sisters, a daughter, a grandson and a granddaughter.

Davis, Alan

Alan Davis

Class of 1958 - Honorary. [Students who attended BYH or BYJrH but for one reason or another graduated from other schools.]

Davis, Alfreda

Davis, Alfreda

Alfreda Davis

Class of 1920. Alfreda Davis. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1920. Source: 1920 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, page 65-85.

Davis, Blanche

Davis, Blanche

Blanche Davis

Class of 1923. Blanche Davis. She received a BYH Normal Diploma in 1923. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 148. ~ ~ ~ ~ Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1925. Blanche Davis. She received a BS Degree [Ho. Admin. -- House Administration] in 1925. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 148.

Davis, Boyd C.

Davis, Boyd C.

Boyd Davis

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1928. Boyd C. Davis. He received a BS Degree in Woodwork in 1928. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 9, page 316.

Davis, Chelta

Davis, Chelta
of Lehi, Utah US

Chelta Davis

Class of 1911. Chelta Davis, of Lehi, Utah. Arts and Trades. Ten billion fairies with her play,/ which gives her much delight./ She hates the man who does not say/ "I love you" at first sight. A real lady who finds pleasure in living. ~ ~ ~ ~ [An extensive search has found no information about Chelta Davis.]

Davis, Cynde Sue

Cynde Sue Davis

Class of 1971. Cynde Sue Davis.

Davis, David Elmer

Davis, David Elmer
Salt Lake City, Utah US

David and Juanita Davis

BY Academy High School Class of 1900. D. E. Davis received a Diploma from the Commercial program. Source: Deseret Evening News, June 2, 1900. ~ ~ ~ ~ David Elmer Davis was born on August 11, 1880 in 3-Mile Creek, Perry, Box Elder County, Utah. His parents were Daniel Davis and Mary Ann Rees Davis. David married Juanita Mary Ann Carver on March 10, 1909 in Weber County, Utah. He died on August 12, 1974 in Salt Lake City, Utah. His interment, Salt Lake City Cemetery, Utah.

Davis, Dix
939 North 100 East
American Fork, Utah 84003 US

Dix and Marjorie Davis
  • Work: 801-756-7148

Class of 1952. Dix Davis. Basketball, Football, Lettermen President, Band, Chorus. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS WIFE'S OBITUARY: Our sweet loving wife, mother, sister and friend Marjorie Rae Hatfield Davis passed away June 8, 2007 with loved ones by her side. Marjorie was born on February 24, 1936 in Springville Utah. She was the first of seven children born to Woodrow and Raynor Hatfield. Marjorie graduated from Springville High School in 1954. She married Dix B. Davis [BYH Class of 1952] on July 16, 1954 in Springville. They were sealed in the Salt Lake Temple on June 5, 1964 and are the proud parents of six children. Marjorie's love for her family took precedence above all else and their comfort and well being was of the utmost importance to her. She always had a "twinkle" in her eye when she spoke of her children and her grandchildren. She was an active member of the LDS church and had a strong testimony of the Gospel. She served in many callings in the Church including Primary, Relief Society President and Counselor. She served in the Mount Timpanogos Temple for many years with her husband and cherished that calling dearly. Marjorie was a talented and gifted artist and passed those talents on to her children and grandchildren. She enjoyed watercolors the most. She was an accomplished seamstress. She designed and created her own wedding dress while in High School. She was the costume designer and creator for the Utah Pageant of the Arts for 17 years. Marjorie worked for the LDS Church at the church office building, evaluating film from all over the world. She had a great love of Genealogy and could always be found searching diligently for her ancestors. She enjoyed creative writing and poetry and wrote many poems. She was loved by all who knew her. Marjorie's sweet countenance and humble spirit will truly be missed. Marjorie is survived by her husband Dix of 52 years and her six children, Kennyon Davis, Bryan (Amy) Davis, Denise (Doug) Baird, Kyle Davis (Karen), Danual (Cathy) Davis, Randall (Kati) Davis, 25 grandchildren, 14 great grandchildren, 2 brothers Dennis Hatfield, Ron Hatfield, 3 sisters Joyce Hatfield Leamaster, Connie Hatfield Childs and Laurie Hatfield Crandall. She is preceded in death by her parents, a younger brother and a grandson. Funeral Services will be held Wednesday June 13, 2007 at 11:00 am in the American Fork 26th Ward Chapel, 975 N. 60 E. Friends may call Tuesday evening June 12 from 6-8 pm at Anderson & Sons Mortuary, 49 E. 100 N. American Fork or Wednesday morning at the Ward Chapel from 9:45-10:45 am. Interment and Grave Dedication will be at the American Fork Cemetery, 100 E. 600 N. Center Street, American Fork Utah. [Provo Daily Herald, June 12, 2007.]

Davis, Douglas

Douglas Davis

Class of 1936. Douglas Davis. Source: 1936 BYH Wildcat yearbook. ~ ~ ~ ~ Is this George Douglas Davis, son of George Hillary Davis and Rhea May Daley Davis, who were married October 21, 1921 at Provo, Utah?

Davis, Doyle J.
42 North Paradise Drive
Orem, Utah 84097-4812 US

Doyle and Carolyn Davis
  • Work: 801-377-5523
  • Home: 801-224-2363

Class of 1960. Doyle J. Davis. Basketball, Baseball, Concert Band. ~ ~ ~ ~ BYU Business Management 1967. ~ ~ ~ ~ Married Carolyn, seven children, six sons and one daughter. Occupation, self-employed in taxes and accounting. Business address: Box 30, Provo, Utah 94603 @2010

Davis, Edwin Spencer

Davis, Edwin Spencer

Edwin Davis

B. Y. Academy High School Commercial Graduate, Class of 1901. Edwin Spencer Davis. He received a "Commercial College Diploma" -- a high school diploma with an emphasis in business. Source: Students Record of Class Standings B. Y. Academy, Book 1, Page 209.

Davis, Emma Lou

Davis, Emma Lou
Provo, Utah US

Emma Lou & LeRoy Swenson

Class of 1952. Emma Lou Davis. Fauvines, Chorus, Notre Maison. HER OBITUARY: Emma Lou Davis Swensen passed away at her home on July 6, 1999. A daughter of Clarence Vernon and Ruby Williams Davis, she was born in Milford, and educated in Caliente, Nev., until the family moved to Provo. She graduated from BY High in 1952 and earned a B.S. from BYU. She began her teaching career in San Diego, but taught in Provo for 37 years at Wasatch and Provost schools. A master teacher, Emma Lou used her expertise in learning theory and motivation to help children become competent. She loved children and to help them succeed. She was recognized by her peers for outstanding ability in the teaching of reading and language development. Active in Delta Kappa Gamma, NEA, UEA, and PEA, she served in numerous capacities in these organizations. She has sung with several singing groups, most recently with her ward choir. She married A. LeRoy Swensen in the Salt Lake Temple. They shared a rich life together centered on devotion to each other and a shared love of music and travel. He passed away in April 1988. Emma Lou served in all the auxiliaries in the LDS Church at the stake and ward level. A great joy has been serving at the Provo Temple two days a week for the past 10 years. She is survived by the families of her two sisters and one aunt: Lee and DyAnn Smoot and children Chandler and William (Provo); Rod and Mary Alice Roylance and children Jenifer, Sarah Rose, Jessica, and granddaughter Cora Lynn (Springville); and Elma Shipp Hewitt (Provo). Her parents and a brother, Clarence Vernon Davis Jr., also preceded her in death. Funeral was held Monday, July 12, 1999, in Provo, Utah. Interment, Wasatch Lawn Cemetery in Salt Lake City. [Provo Daily Herald, July 11, 1999]

Davis, Eva M.

Davis, Eva M.

Eva Ovard

Collegiate Grad of BYU, Class of 1926. Eva M. Davis [Ovard]. She received an AB Degree in Clothing in 1926. Source: Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 10, page 262.

Davis, Faun

Davis, Faun

Faun Davis

Class of 1922. Faun Davis. Source: 1922 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section.

Davis, Flora

Davis, Flora
Provo, Utah US

Flora and Asael Fisher

Class of 1911. Flora Davis of Provo, Utah. Normal [Teacher Prep]. Shortly before the close of school in 1911, Flora was asked to transfer from the BYH to the Industrial School at Ogden -- and she was our class vice-president. Reports say she is imminently successful there as teacher of industrial arts. Source: BYHS Yearbook 1911. ~ ~ ~ ~ Faculty & Staff -- BYU Elementary Training School Teacher, Third Grade -- Late 1940s - Early 1950s. ~ ~ ~ ~ Flora Davis was born July 29, 1891 in Provo, Utah. Her parents were: Albert Marion Davis and Mary Elizabeth Broadbent. Flora married Asael Henry Fisher on May 15, 1912 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Flora Davis Fisher died on June 10, 1984. ~ ~ ~ ~ She taught 3rd Grade and also Arts and Crafts for Elementary School Teachers at Brigham Young University. A gifted artist who exhibited her work in the community as well as in her classroom, Flora Davis Fisher was a creative, talented, excellent teacher who was highly regarded by her peers, parents, and students. She instilled in her students a desire to do their best and to give their best, believing that every person had the responsibility to contribute to the world and make it a better place, regardless of their challenges or circumstances. She taught her students to be the very best people they could be and to never quit or give up, even when things were difficult for them. She never gave up on her students either, no matter what their difficulties. Having lost her father at a young age, Flora helped her widowed mother support and raise the large family on a small family farm. Flora worked hard and sacrificed much to help her mother see that every child in her large family graduated from college, against great odds. Flora was a tireless worker, who continued to bless children's and teachers lives long after her years of formal teaching ended. Wherever there was a child in need, Flora was there to help them. She generously shared her artistic gifts with a paintbrush, and an embroidery needle, and could make something out of anything, as her prospective elementary teacher students at BYU often challenged her to do. Flora Davis married to Asael H. Fisher, also a gifted teacher and craftsman at Provo High, who had two specialties: teaching woodworking, and helping rescue teenage boys who needed a strong mentor and someone to love and care about them. They were a dynamite couple. Their 3 children are: J. Dean Fisher (Marjorie Stevens), Grant A. Fisher (Elayne Taylor), and Afton Fisher Graham (Arnold). ~ ~ ~ ~ Source 2: Flora Davis Fisher. She received three diplomas in 1911: Normal Diploma; Art & Manual Training Diploma; and Kindergarten Normal Diploma. Annual Record, B.Y. University, Book 3, p. 195.

Davis, Gilbert Eugene

Davis, Gilbert Eugene
Boise, Idaho US

Gilbert and Susan Davis

Class of 1961. Gilbert E. Davis. He was born on January 3, 1942 in Marne, Michigan. BYU 1967. He passed away on March 8, 2007 in Boise, Idaho. ~ ~ ~ ~ Deseret News article: Idahoan's Homemade Plane May Have Been In Stealth Test. An Idaho man says he piloted his homemade flying wing aircraft into Hill Air Force Base in 1987 in what apparently was an unofficial test of any radar-eluding qualities possessed by the plane - similar in appearance to the new B-2 Stealth bomber. Gilbert E. Davis of Boise says the shape and construction of his aircraft, if not its 35-foot wingspan, is similar to the B-2 unveiled Tuesday by Northrop Corp. in California.Each essentially is two swept wings with a bulge in the middle for a cockpit. Both use composite structural materials where most airplanes are made of metals, although the multimillion-dollar bomber's synthetics certainly are more exotic than Davis' plastic foam and fiberglass. To a lesser extent, Davis' airplane resembles a picture of the F-117A Stealth fighter the Air Force has flown secretly at night in Nevada since 1983 but announced just two weeks ago. Stealth technology is supposed to help aircraft avoid detection by radar, allowing them to slip through enemy defenses. Just how the jet Stealth bomber and fighter are built to achieve this remains a secret of the Pentagon. But Davis said space-age composite materials like carbon fiber reflect less radar than metal, and a flying wing's slim, smooth profile further reduces bouncing signals. ``The flying wing is hard to detect on radar,'' he said in a telephone interview. Stealth is not what Davis had in mind when he designed and built his recreational machine as a prototype for a larger version he plans to sell in kit form. However, that apparently is what was tested at Hill a year after the plane was first propelled into flight by a snowmobile engine in 1986. Hill spokesman Len Barry did not know the exact reason for the June 1987 test, but said, ``Apparently, it did occur.'' Davis had been invited to speak about his flying wing at the annual convention of the Utah Pilots Association, which had a dinner in the base officers club on June 5, 1987. He said then-Maj. Gen. Robert P. McCoy, since promoted to the Air Force Logistics Command in Ohio, had let it be known he would be in the control tower at 8 a.m. that day. Davis said the word came down that the base commander wanted him to fly the radar approach. Although they were not told why, both Davis and his brother, Ross Davis of Murray, feel the only sensible reason was to see how the flying wing would appear on radar. The brothers approached from the north. Ross Davis, a former Army helicopter pilot, flew a metal, conventionally designed propeller airplane with a radio transponder emitting signals to help show its position. ``They did see me,'' Ross Davis said. About 50 feet off his right wing, Gilbert Davis knifed through the air in his thin, fiberglass-skinned machine, which lacked a transponder. Mission accomplished, the brothers flew by the tower and returned to Ogden Municipal Airport. That night at the dinner, Gilbert Davis said, he asked McCoy about the results of the test. He said the general was like a seasoned poker player. ``You don't know what he's got in his hand,'' he said. ``I couldn't find out what they saw or didn't see.'' [Deseret News, Monday, November 28, 1988.] Alternate address: Gilbert Davis, 6514 York St., Boise, ID 83704-7576 - (208) 375-3476. Also: c/o Barney Vincelette, Houston, Delaware 19954 - (302) 732-6322. ~ ~ ~ ~ MORE INFO, 12 MARCH 2006: "There has been a bit of literary flair added to this experience as presently published, and a few details left out. My name is Dan Hennis. I was the Pilot-in-Command, (PIC) of the reported flight in June of 1987. We flew my 1947 Ercoupe model 415-D that I had converted from a "C". Gilbert's brother was allowed to be the right-seater because Gilbert asked me. Ross was to be the radioman between Gilbert and us. As for the General's involvement, I was a Construction Manager in the 2849th CES based at Hill AFB. I contacted my friends in the General's AFLC office and asked if he might be persuaded to make an "unscheduled inspection" of the tower that morning. My supervisor, MSgt DeLott (I think) allowed me to take a couple of hours off to do this bit of PR for/with Gilbert Davis. If memory serves, the MSgt used this time to rub shoulders with the General and swing a special assignment he was wanting. It seemed all that could go wrong did that morning, from bad radios, to charging system on my coupe blinking out, to Gilbert misrepresenting the cruise speed we had to go while in close formation. We were nearly shot down, due to Gilbert circling over the alert KC-135s at the north end of the runway. I asked for a "mid-field turn-out" after making a missed approach maneuver, and was approved. When I thought I could reasonably make such a turn, right in front of the General's viewpoint in the tower, I pulled up and banked right in front of the tower and Gilbert followed second. He was a bit more daring and missed the tower cab by something less than 100 feet. It was reported by my supervisor that the General took a step back as Gilbert's "wing" rolled up flat to display his belly to the tower. I nearly lost my license that day from that stunt and vowed to never fly with a "nut" ever again. Gilbert is quite a designer, but his piloting skills left a bit less to admire. I think the world of him, but to this day, he is still a bit impulsive. As for the "testing" alluded to, the General never knew what his enlisted staff had cooked up for his viewing pleasure that day. Len Barry was specifically kept out of the loop and would have not allowed such to happen. There was nothing before it, nor after it. Gilbert has hoped to get a government contract by enticing the General with this chance flight. Never happened. With regard to the comment about the "Base Commander" -- it was standard practice to get the Commander's OK before any civilian flights entered the pattern. Otherwise the consequences might be a bit more hostile. It was reported later by another friend attending the dinner, that the General was not particularly impressed with our piloting skills. There were no jets, bombs, smoke, or mirrors. It was just a couple of "bug smashers" buzzing the active runway off the North end of Hill AFB that morning. In fact, the Rapcon was a bit bewildered as they reported, "that a flock of fast-moving birds were following the vintage Ercoupe on final and did a left-hand 360 over the threshold before moving off to the west." These are hands-on, eye-witness corrections. I'd hate to find history recorded without all the facts, or overglamorized to satisfy a thrill. I am sure the account was from a certain perspective, but inaccurate is still wrong. ~ ~ ~ ~ By-the-way, shortly after that flight, Gilbert Davis was badly injured in that same plane. It nearly cost him his life, and he is now paralyzed from the waist down and is in constant pain both day and night. He lives in Boise. Due to the extreme cost associated with his physical recovery, and no insurance, he lost his plane, his company, and the dream. I see him from time to time in the LDS temple and wish with all my heart the he had not broken his back in that fateful crash. The plane showed promise, but as in all aviation, is never forgiving... Dan Hennis -- D.M.Hennis@worldnet.att.net ~ ~ ~ ~ MORE INFO: Gilbert has had many exciting ventures. He has been blessed many times and survived many things. The last crash (or should we say "undesirable landing") was in Idaho at a small airport not too far from the town of Emmett. He lost engine power and was forced to attempt an emergency landing. In so doing, he was severely injured, and is now in a care home in Eagle, Idaho. He is paralyzed from the waist down. He is in great pain, but does not want to 'give up'. The project on which he was working was a lifetime venture. He must be admired for his determination and singlemindedness, but realistically there is no one else who has time or money to focus on Gilbert's dream project and nothing else. Gilbert loves to have company, but visitors must take great care to refrain from making him upset. He still wants nothing but to complete his project, but it could not be under more difficult circumstances. Frank Hennis. ~ ~ ~ ~ HIS OBITUARY: Eugene Davis passed away on March 8, 2007, in Boise, Idaho. He was born Jan. 3, 1942, in Marne, Mich., to Levi Walter Davis and Idella Marie Vipond Davis, the third of seven children. He was raised in Apopka, Florida, and later moved to Utah where he graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1961. He met Susan Kay Hawkins while attending BYU. On August 5, 1969, they were married for time and all eternity in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple. Gilbert was a dedicated member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who loved the gospel and his family. He and Susan lived most of their married life together in Boise, Idaho, where they raised their 10 children. Gilbert was a very talented and inquisitive child. He excelled in sports and was very acrobatic, and later in life learned to ride a unicycle, walk a tightrope, and walk on his hands. His older children will always remember his walking on his hands up and down flights of stairs or around the edge of the top platform at the Lava Hot Springs pool (before diving off, much to the lifeguards chagrin...) It was also in his childhood that he learned to love all things mechanical, tinkering with model airplanes, trains and motorcycles, and eventually working in a motorcycle shop, where he loved to test-drive the new BSAs and Nortons. But of all the things he grew to love as a child, airplanes were by far at the top of his list. For his eighth birthday, his father paid for him to take a ride with a barnstorming pilot - from then on his dream was to fly. Though Gilbert´s first attempt at building his own plane was foiled - when the 14 year-old´s secret workshop under the floor of the family garage was discovered by his father - his dreams of designing and flying his own airplanes were far from over. With little formal instruction or college experience, Gilbert went on to design and build several airplanes and propulsion systems, culminating on June 10, 1986, when he taxied down the strip of the Nampa Municipal Airport and lifted off - the first public flight of the Davis Flying Wing. News of the successful flight of a tailless aircraft of such novel design spread instantly through the aeronautical community. Gilbert graced the cover of numerous aviation magazines, including the January 1987 issue of Popular Mechanics. The single-seat aircraft flew beautifully, and a two-seat prototype version of the Wing was nearly complete when, in May of 1989, an engine belt failure forced Gilbert down near Star. Though Gilbert would spend the rest of his days confined to a wheelchair and experience tremendous medical problems including severe chronic pain, he never lost his faith, his love for his family, and his desire to pursue his dreams. His family is very proud of him and his undaunted courage and faith, and he will be dearly missed by his wife Susan; his 10 children: Mary (and F. Alan) Walker of Boise, Idaho; Katie (and Lane) Packwood of Boise, Idaho; Mike (and Michelle) Davis of Los Angeles, California; Aaron of Boise, Idaho; Sarah (and Lucas) Bollschweiler of Maryville, Tennesse; Jenny (and Michael) Kimball of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Levi, Lynsey, Mallory, and Bethany of Provo, Utah; 13 grandchildren; and his siblings: Mary K. Davis, Ross Davis, Doug Davis, Bea Glover, and Danny Davis. He was preceded in death by his parents and an infant sister, Emeline. Family and friends are invited to attend a viewing to be held on Monday evening, March 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Relyea Funeral Chapel at 318 N. Latah. Funeral services were held Tuesday morning, March 13, 2007 at the LDS Boise South Stake Center at 3200 Cassia. His interment, Dry Creek Cemetery. “Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming 'Wow! What a ride!' ” - Unknown We love you, Dad. [Idaho Statesman, March 11, 2007]

Davis, Harold

Davis, Harold

Harold Davis

Class of 1914. Harold Davis. Graduated in 1914 from Brigham Young High School, Academic Department. Source: 1914 BYU Banyan, BYH section, pp. 84-89.

Davis, Ida

Davis, Ida

Ida Davis

Class of 1920. Ida Davis. Graduated from Brigham Young High School in 1920. Source: 1920 BYU Banyan yearbook, BYH section, page 65-85.

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